History GrowingTheBeard / LiveActionTV

20th Apr '16 2:17:51 PM TotalDramaRox97
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* ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'' started out fairly good in Season 1, but starting in Season 2 there were noticeable changes in quality for the better. The show started using better audio effects, most of the victims were less sympathetic, the narrator, Ron Perlman, developed from a blunt but fairly stiff narrator to a full blown DeadpanSnarker, the puns became a lot funnier, the deaths became a lot more interesting to watch, and they put a lot more diversity into their segments with each one feeling noticeably different.

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* ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'' started out fairly good in Season 1, but starting in Season 2 there were noticeable changes in quality for the better. The show started using better audio effects, most of the victims were less sympathetic, the narrator, Ron Perlman, developed from a blunt but fairly stiff narrator to a full blown DeadpanSnarker, the puns became a lot funnier, the deaths became a lot more in-depth and interesting to watch, and they put a lot more diversity into their segments with each one feeling noticeably different.
20th Apr '16 2:15:50 PM TotalDramaRox97
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* ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'' started out fairly good in Season 1, but starting in Season 2 there were noticeable changes in quality for the better. The show started using better audio effects, most of the victims were very unsympathetic, the narrator, Ron Perlman, developed from a blunt but fairly stiff narrator to a full blown DeadpanSnarker, the puns became a lot funnier, the deaths became a lot more interesting to watch, and they put a lot more diversity into their segments with each one feeling noticeably different.

to:

* ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'' started out fairly good in Season 1, but starting in Season 2 there were noticeable changes in quality for the better. The show started using better audio effects, most of the victims were very unsympathetic, less sympathetic, the narrator, Ron Perlman, developed from a blunt but fairly stiff narrator to a full blown DeadpanSnarker, the puns became a lot funnier, the deaths became a lot more interesting to watch, and they put a lot more diversity into their segments with each one feeling noticeably different.
20th Apr '16 2:15:23 PM TotalDramaRox97
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* ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'' started out fairly good in Season 1, but starting in Season 2 there were noticeable changes in quality for the better. The show started using better audio effects, most of the victims were very unsympathetic, the narrator, Ron Perlman, developed from a blunt but fairly stiff narrator to a full blown DeadpanSnarker, the puns became a lot funnier, the deaths became a lot more interesting to watch, and they put a lot more diversity into their segments with each one feeling noticeably different.
10th Apr '16 4:12:25 PM GoldenSandslash
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** Most viewers agree that ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'' was just finding its voice in either the third season (which was a tight, serialized full-season {{arc}} in the style of ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'') or the fourth (where Manny Coto became showrunner, made a bunch of {{Authors Saving Throw}}s[[note]]with the Temporal Cold War, the Vulcans, and so on[[/note]] and started organizing the show to tie it in better with [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original series]][[note]]with the ongoing arc of increased inter-species cooperation, increased hostility with Romulans (to lead up to the Romulan War), and establishment of the Coalition of Planets (as the League-of-Nations-esque predecessor to the Federation)[[/note]]). Unfortunately, the show was cancelled at this point, so we'll never know if the beard would've stayed on. General consensus, however, is the beard fell out with the controversial (and widely hated) finale episode.

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** Most viewers agree that ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'' was just finding its voice in either the third season (which was a tight, serialized full-season {{arc}} in the style of ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'') or the fourth (where Manny Coto became showrunner, made a bunch of {{Authors Saving Throw}}s[[note]]with the Temporal Cold War, the Vulcans, and so on[[/note]] and started organizing the show to tie it in better with [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original series]][[note]]with the ongoing arc of increased inter-species cooperation, increased hostility with Romulans (to lead up to the Romulan War), and establishment of the Coalition of Planets (as the League-of-Nations-esque predecessor to the Federation)[[/note]]). Unfortunately, the show was cancelled at this point, so we'll never know if the beard would've stayed on. General consensus, however, is the beard fell out with the controversial (and widely hated) hated finale episode.
9th Apr '16 12:11:02 AM DastardlyDemolition
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* In its first season, ''Series/{{Chuck}}'' was a fun show, if occasionally uneven. The second season tightened up the spy plots, improved the action scenes, better-integrated the spy and non-spy elements of the show, and introduced mytharc elements, making it into a show capable of delivering 42 minutes of continual awesome.

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* In its first season, ''Series/{{Chuck}}'' was a fun show, if occasionally uneven. The second season tightened up the spy plots, improved the action scenes, better-integrated the spy and non-spy elements of the show, and introduced mytharc MythArc elements, making it into a show capable of delivering 42 minutes of continual awesome.
1st Apr '16 12:20:02 PM Brutusness
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* Whilst the first season of ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' struggled with a few aspects of the show's unusual tone to start with, the second season really hits its stride with the introduction of Frank as a regular, as well as changing Dee from the voice of reason to a neurotic, amoral mess like the rest of the gang and emphasising various aspects of the others (Charlie's [[ManChild immaturity]], Dennis' [[TheSociopath sociopathy]]). ''Dennis and Dee Go On Welfare'' is generally seen as the definitive beard-growing moment.

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* Whilst the first season of ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' struggled with a few aspects of the show's unusual tone to start with, the second season really hits its stride with the introduction of Frank as a regular, as well as changing Dee from the voice of reason to a neurotic, amoral mess like the rest of the gang and emphasising various aspects of the others (Charlie's [[ManChild immaturity]], Dennis' [[TheSociopath sociopathy]]).sociopathy]], Mac's... [[ArmouredClosetGay confusion]]). ''Dennis and Dee Go On Welfare'' is generally seen as the definitive beard-growing moment.
25th Mar '16 8:08:28 AM Exxolon
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** Series 5 (the first with Creator/MattSmith) was a bit uneven in it's first three episodes with Smith obviously still trying to get a handle on the character (though the Eleventh Doctor's berserk attack on a Dalek in episode 3 gives a foreshadowing). The two parter "The Time of Angels" / "Flesh and Stone" is where Smith nails the character and suceeds properly to the legacy of Creator/DavidTennant's hyper popular Tenth Doctor. Smith never looks back and the rest of his tenure is generally considered to be an excellent portrayal of the character.


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** This trope seems to be prevalent amongst ''all'' the incarnations after the First Doctor - it's obvious that it takes time for the actors, writers, directors (and other members of the creative team) and the audience to get into sync with the new paradigm when the principal character is recast and it can take anything from an episode or two to most of a season/series for everything to gel together successfully.
24th Mar '16 5:56:14 PM nombretomado
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* While supposedly [[BrokenBase this is not unanimous]], there is a general opinion that ''Series/ADifferentWorld'' became a distinctive show of its own with the second season, when Lisa Bonet left, severing the connection between the show and its (ahem) parent, ''TheCosbyShow''. Debbie Allen took over and decided to {{Retool}} the show to make it better reflect the black-college experience as she had known it. The ratings went down, but that was more due to the change in timeslot, and the show had several good seasons.

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* While supposedly [[BrokenBase this is not unanimous]], there is a general opinion that ''Series/ADifferentWorld'' became a distinctive show of its own with the second season, when Lisa Bonet left, severing the connection between the show and its (ahem) parent, ''TheCosbyShow''.''Series/TheCosbyShow''. Debbie Allen took over and decided to {{Retool}} the show to make it better reflect the black-college experience as she had known it. The ratings went down, but that was more due to the change in timeslot, and the show had several good seasons.
23rd Mar '16 11:41:21 AM nombretomado
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* ''Series/TheDailyShow'', when it started out in 1996 with Craig Kilborn, made fun of the news media but it didn't have any particular focus; it seemed like a generic news-parody show, or basically ComedyCentral's [[FollowTheLeader answer to]] [[TheSoup Talk Soup]]. Jon Stewart's arrival in January 1999 changed everything, as Stewart's vision of the show was less about mocking celebrities and their scandals and more about hard-hitting political satire with a left-wing slant, which led to the show becoming more serious-minded with its humor and interviews. This last bit began to attract major political figures, elected and retired, to the show to be interviewed by Stewart, who evolved into quite the capable interviewer; notably, three sitting heads of state (Presidents Pervez Musharraf of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}} in September 2006, [[IronLady Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf]] of UsefulNotes/{{Liberia}} in April 2009, and ''freakin' '''UsefulNotes/BarackObama''''' in October 2010) have sat down with him.

to:

* ''Series/TheDailyShow'', when it started out in 1996 with Craig Kilborn, made fun of the news media but it didn't have any particular focus; it seemed like a generic news-parody show, or basically ComedyCentral's Creator/ComedyCentral's [[FollowTheLeader answer to]] [[TheSoup Talk Soup]]. Jon Stewart's arrival in January 1999 changed everything, as Stewart's vision of the show was less about mocking celebrities and their scandals and more about hard-hitting political satire with a left-wing slant, which led to the show becoming more serious-minded with its humor and interviews. This last bit began to attract major political figures, elected and retired, to the show to be interviewed by Stewart, who evolved into quite the capable interviewer; notably, three sitting heads of state (Presidents Pervez Musharraf of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}} in September 2006, [[IronLady Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf]] of UsefulNotes/{{Liberia}} in April 2009, and ''freakin' '''UsefulNotes/BarackObama''''' in October 2010) have sat down with him.
21st Mar '16 5:52:29 PM bwburke94
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* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' had an above average to good start, particularly thanks to its subversions of the expected plotlines with the reveal that John Barrowman, as Malcolm Merlin, was the Dark Archer. However, the show still had some very uneven footing, thanks in part to sometimes meandering flashback sequences (which are a major part of any episode's format), an episodic FreakOfTheWeek format with subpar villains, and an unrelentingly serious tone. Towards the end of Season 1, an episode called 'The Odyssey' landed. It featured the first use of Diggle, [[BreakoutCharacter Felicity]], and Oliver as a PowerTrio, and was a flashback heavy episode featuring [[EnsembleDarkhorse Slade]] [[CrazyAwesome Wilson]]. This started a trend of engaging Island stories, stronger characterization of the main cast, and a revamping of formerly lackluster villains. The beard was grown completely two episodes later, when Deadshot, thought dead, received a MidSeasonUpgrade and Malcolm's FreudianExcuse was revealed.

to:

* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' had an above average to good start, particularly thanks to its subversions of the expected plotlines with the reveal that John Barrowman, as Malcolm Merlin, Merlyn was the Dark Archer. However, the show still had some very uneven footing, thanks in part to sometimes meandering flashback sequences (which are a major part of any episode's format), an episodic FreakOfTheWeek format with subpar villains, and an unrelentingly serious tone. Towards the end of Season 1, an episode called 'The Odyssey' landed. It featured the first use of Diggle, [[BreakoutCharacter Felicity]], and Oliver as a PowerTrio, and was a flashback heavy episode featuring [[EnsembleDarkhorse Slade]] [[CrazyAwesome Wilson]]. This started a trend of engaging Island stories, stronger characterization of the main cast, and a revamping of formerly lackluster villains. The beard was grown completely two episodes later, when Deadshot, thought dead, received a MidSeasonUpgrade and Malcolm's FreudianExcuse was revealed.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=GrowingTheBeard.LiveActionTV