History GrowingTheBeard / LiveActionTV

4th Feb '17 2:34:29 PM KeithM
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** The Big Bads of the second season get in on it as well. While Damien Darhk had been amusingly snarky on ''Series/{{Arrow}}, Merlyn had been more melodramatic, and Eobard Thawne on ''Series/TheFlash2014'' had been played dead-serious most of the time. When they get together to go against the Legends, [[SnarkToSnarkCombat the snark gets dialed up to 11]] which makes them far more entertaining to watch than the overblown Vandal Savage who came across as Generic Evil Overlord.

to:

** The Big Bads of the second season get in on it as well. While Damien Darhk had been amusingly snarky on ''Series/{{Arrow}}, ''Series/{{Arrow}}'', Merlyn had been more melodramatic, and Eobard Thawne on ''Series/TheFlash2014'' had been played dead-serious most of the time. When they get together to go against the Legends, [[SnarkToSnarkCombat the snark gets dialed up to 11]] which makes them far more entertaining to watch than the overblown Vandal Savage who came across as Generic Evil Overlord.
4th Feb '17 2:33:20 PM KeithM
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** The Big Bads of the second season get in on it as well. While Damien Darhk had been amusingly snarky on ''Series/{{Arrow}}, Merlyn had been more melodramatic, and Eobard Thawne on ''Series/TheFlash2014'' had been played dead-serious most of the time. When they get together to go against the Legends, [[SnarkToSnarkCombat]] the snark gets dialed up to 11 which makes them far more entertaining to watch than the overblown Vandal Savage who came across as Generic Evil Overlord.

to:

** The Big Bads of the second season get in on it as well. While Damien Darhk had been amusingly snarky on ''Series/{{Arrow}}, Merlyn had been more melodramatic, and Eobard Thawne on ''Series/TheFlash2014'' had been played dead-serious most of the time. When they get together to go against the Legends, [[SnarkToSnarkCombat]] [[SnarkToSnarkCombat the snark gets dialed up to 11 11]] which makes them far more entertaining to watch than the overblown Vandal Savage who came across as Generic Evil Overlord.
4th Feb '17 2:32:05 PM KeithM
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Added DiffLines:

** The Big Bads of the second season get in on it as well. While Damien Darhk had been amusingly snarky on ''Series/{{Arrow}}, Merlyn had been more melodramatic, and Eobard Thawne on ''Series/TheFlash2014'' had been played dead-serious most of the time. When they get together to go against the Legends, [[SnarkToSnarkCombat]] the snark gets dialed up to 11 which makes them far more entertaining to watch than the overblown Vandal Savage who came across as Generic Evil Overlord.
4th Feb '17 2:12:18 PM Kadorhal
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** Season 2 of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''. At that moment, we see Commander Will Riker sport his distinctive beard, marking his growth into something other than a Kirk clone. (Apparently the beard was a ThrowItIn by Creator/GeneRoddenberry, Jonathan Frakes returned after the season break for script readings with that beard and Roddenberry felt it gave him a far more dignified appearance. It's hard to argue.) Meanwhile, other characters begin to find their niches, such as Geordi La Forge being assigned as Chief Engineer, where he could do something other than use his VISOR as a [[AppliedPhlebotinum plot device]].

to:

** Season 2 of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''. At that moment, we see Commander Will Riker sport his distinctive beard, marking his growth into something other than a Kirk clone. (Apparently Apparently the beard was a ThrowItIn by Creator/GeneRoddenberry, Creator/GeneRoddenberry; Jonathan Frakes returned after the season break for script readings with that beard beard, and Roddenberry felt it gave him a far more dignified appearance. It's hard to argue.) Meanwhile, other characters begin to find their niches, such as Geordi La Forge being assigned as Chief Engineer, where he could do something other than use his VISOR as a [[AppliedPhlebotinum plot device]].



--->'''Riker''': I don't need your fantasy women.
--->'''Q''': Oh, you're so stolid. You weren't like that before the beard.

to:

--->'''Riker''': I don't need your fantasy women.
--->'''Q''':
women.\\
'''Q''':
Oh, you're so stolid. You weren't like that before the beard.



*** Though it was season 3 that showed the most improvement. This trope could well have been named for the season finale "The Best of Both Worlds", in which ''Next Generation'' not only became a great show, but also emerged from its predecessor's shadow. (It also marked ''Next Generation'' starting a season 4, something its predecessor never did.)

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*** Though it was season 3 that showed the most improvement. This trope could well have been named for the season finale "The Best of Both Worlds", in which ''Next Generation'' not only became a great show, but also emerged from its predecessor's shadow. (It also marked ''Next Generation'' starting shadow and, unlike said predecessor, guaranteed itself a season 4, something its predecessor never did.)fourth season.



** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' did the same, with Captain Sisko growing the beard this time. (This one isn't generally considered an improvement so much as a change in tone.)

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** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' did the same, with Captain Sisko growing the beard this time. (This This one isn't generally considered an improvement so much as a change in tone.)



*** The season 2 finale "The Jem'Hadar" also did something similar to what TNG did with the Borg by introducing a potent new enemy in the form of the Dominion. Led by mysterious "founders" and employing the titular Jem'Hadars as soldiers. The episode climaxed with the Jem'Hadar destroying a Galaxy-Class ship, the same type as the Enterprise of TNG, to show what a threat they could represent. The looming threat of the Dominion would drive much of the show before it escalated into the 3 season-long Dominion War, and would be the impetus behind many of the other changes mentioned above (the Defiant, Sisko's growing role as Emissary, etc...).

to:

*** The season 2 finale "The Jem'Hadar" also did something similar to what TNG did with the Borg by introducing a potent new enemy in the form of the Dominion. Led by mysterious "founders" and employing the titular Jem'Hadars as soldiers. The episode climaxed with the Jem'Hadar destroying a Galaxy-Class ship, the same type as the Enterprise of TNG, ''TNG'', to show what a threat they could represent. The looming threat of the Dominion would drive much of the show before it escalated into the 3 season-long Dominion War, and would be the impetus behind many of the other changes mentioned above (the Defiant, Sisko's growing role as Emissary, etc...).



** Most viewers agree that ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'' was just finding its voice in either the third season (which was a tight, serialized full-season {{arc}} in the style of ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'') or the fourth (where Manny Coto became showrunner, made a bunch of {{Authors Saving Throw}}s[[note]]with the Temporal Cold War, the Vulcans, and so on[[/note]] and started organizing the show to tie it in better with [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original series]][[note]]with the ongoing arc of increased inter-species cooperation, increased hostility with Romulans (to lead up to the Romulan War), and establishment of the Coalition of Planets (as the League-of-Nations-esque predecessor to the Federation)[[/note]]). Unfortunately, the show was cancelled at this point, so we'll never know if the beard would've stayed on. General consensus, however, is the beard fell out with the widely hated finale episode.

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** Most viewers agree that ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'' was just finding its voice in either the third season (which was a tight, serialized full-season {{arc}} in the style of ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep ''Deep Space Nine]]'') Nine'') or the fourth (where Manny Coto became showrunner, made a bunch of {{Authors Saving Throw}}s[[note]]with the Temporal Cold War, the Vulcans, and so on[[/note]] and started organizing the show to tie it in better with [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original series]][[note]]with the ongoing arc of increased inter-species cooperation, increased hostility with Romulans (to lead up to the Romulan War), and establishment of the Coalition of Planets (as the League-of-Nations-esque predecessor to the Federation)[[/note]]). Unfortunately, the show was cancelled at this point, so we'll never know if the beard would've stayed on. General consensus, however, is the beard fell out with the widely hated finale episode.
21st Jan '17 4:55:11 PM Anddrix
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Added DiffLines:

* Fans of ''Series/{{Shadowhunters}}'' point to the fifth episode "Moo Shu To Go" as a marked improvement. The actors settle into their characters better - especially Emeraude Tobia and Matthew Daddario, effects get a little better and the episode structure is better.
14th Jan '17 6:35:19 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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** It started out better than ''Series/Arrow'' but still suffered from the same issue that show did: villains. Weather Wizard was hammy and killed off, as were Multiplex and Mist. But then Episode 4 came and with it... Captain Cold. With its introduction of a compelling villain, fractures in the Team Flash dynamic (with the reveal that Cisco had created the cold gun), great use of Felicity Smoak (who at this time had begun her descent into fan hatred on Arrow), and an ending promising more Rogues to appear, Episode 4 would begin growing the beard for the show.

to:

** It started out better than ''Series/Arrow'' ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' but still suffered from the same issue that show did: villains. Weather Wizard was hammy and killed off, as were Multiplex and Mist. But then Episode 4 came and with it... Captain Cold. With its introduction of a compelling villain, fractures in the Team Flash dynamic (with the reveal that Cisco had created the cold gun), great use of Felicity Smoak (who at this time had begun her descent into fan hatred on Arrow), and an ending promising more Rogues to appear, Episode 4 would begin growing the beard for the show.
14th Jan '17 6:26:32 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* ''Conan'', an example of actual beard-growing. After being dumped from a short and frustrating stint on NBC's ''Tonight Show'', Conan O'Brien returned with a late-night talk show on TBS -- far more relaxed, confident, creative, and funny than what he'd done before. And with a beard.

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* ''Conan'', ''Series/{{Conan}}'', an example of actual beard-growing. After being dumped from a short and frustrating stint on NBC's ''Tonight Show'', Conan O'Brien returned with a late-night talk show on TBS -- far more relaxed, confident, creative, and funny than what he'd done before. And with a beard.
4th Jan '17 1:51:08 AM NightShade96
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* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' had an above average to good start, particularly thanks to its subversions of the expected plotlines with the reveal that Malcolm Merlyn was the Dark Archer. However, the show still had some very uneven footing, thanks in part to sometimes meandering flashback sequences (which are a major part of any episode's format), an episodic FreakOfTheWeek format with subpar villains, and an unrelentingly serious tone. Towards the end of Season 1, an episode called 'The Odyssey' landed. It featured the first use of Diggle, [[BreakoutCharacter Felicity]], and Oliver as a PowerTrio, and was a flashback heavy episode featuring [[EnsembleDarkhorse Slade]] [[CrazyAwesome Wilson]]. This started a trend of engaging Island stories, stronger characterization of the main cast, and a revamping of formerly lackluster villains. The beard was grown completely two episodes later, when Deadshot, thought dead, received a MidSeasonUpgrade and Malcolm's FreudianExcuse was revealed.

to:

* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' had an above average above-average to good start, particularly thanks to its subversions of the expected plotlines with the reveal that Malcolm Merlyn was the Dark Archer. However, the show still had some very uneven footing, thanks in part to sometimes meandering flashback sequences (which are a major part of any episode's format), an episodic FreakOfTheWeek format with subpar villains, and an unrelentingly serious tone. Towards the end of Season 1, an episode called 'The Odyssey' landed. It featured the first use of Diggle, [[BreakoutCharacter Felicity]], and Oliver as a PowerTrio, and was a flashback heavy episode featuring [[EnsembleDarkhorse Slade]] [[CrazyAwesome Wilson]]. This started a trend of engaging Island stories, stronger characterization of the main cast, and a revamping of formerly lackluster villains. The beard was grown completely two episodes later, when Deadshot, thought dead, received a MidSeasonUpgrade and Malcolm's FreudianExcuse was revealed.



* ''Series/{{Angel}}''. Although it's arguable whether or not the first season is necessarily better or worse than the ones that follow, there show certainly experienced a shift following the initial season. The first season finale was the first to demonstrate a sense of the long MythArc storyline as opposed to the story arcs that usually lasted one or two episodes. Buffy was known for but was not restrained by the HalfArcSeason long BigBad story.

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* ''Series/{{Angel}}''. ''Series/{{Angel}}'':
**
Although it's arguable whether or not the first season is necessarily better or worse than the ones that follow, there show certainly experienced a shift following the initial season. The first season finale was the first to demonstrate a sense of the long MythArc storyline as opposed to the story arcs that usually lasted one or two episodes. Buffy was known for but was not restrained by the HalfArcSeason long BigBad story.



* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' started off with a healthy amount of comedic charm but its stories relied a little too much on CringeComedy and was trying to be more risque than what felt natural for the show (which is something the writers even commented on). By the end of the first season the show managed to find its voice, but the episode that started to cement the characters was episode 6 "Middle-Earth Paradigm" where Penny throws a Halloween party and invites the guys over. That episode really highlighted the personality clash between the main characters and "normal" people. It also showed the first hints that Leonard's crush on Penny may not be a lost cause.

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* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'':
** It
started off with a healthy amount of comedic charm but its stories relied a little too much on CringeComedy and was trying to be more risque than what felt natural for the show (which is something the writers even commented on). By the end of the first season the show managed to find its voice, but the episode that started to cement the characters was episode 6 "Middle-Earth Paradigm" where Penny throws a Halloween party and invites the guys over. That episode really highlighted the personality clash between the main characters and "normal" people. It also showed the first hints that Leonard's crush on Penny may not be a lost cause.



** Spike and Drusilla's arrival in Sunnydale proved a noticeable upswing, but the true beard-growing moment was probably the resurgence of Angelus, cementing the shift from MonsterOfTheWeek episodes to a darkly comedic, character-driven series. TrueArtIsAngsty, after all, right?

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** Spike and Drusilla's arrival in Sunnydale proved a noticeable upswing, but the true beard-growing moment was probably the resurgence of Angelus, cementing the shift from MonsterOfTheWeek episodes to a darkly comedic, character-driven series. TrueArtIsAngsty, TrueArtIsAngsty after all, right?



* The beard-growing second season of ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' switched away from dealing with the Christian Church in season one and into dealing with Wicca, started to grow the characters as both people and sisters and added the plotlines of Piper and Leo, Phoebe and college, and Prue's new power.
** Some believe the show didn't fully hit its stride until the third season when it introduced Phoebe's first long term love interest in the half demon/half human Cole [[spoiler: a.k.a. Belthazor]], and The Source became the new primary new villain, making the show much more heavily arc driven.

to:

* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'':
**
The beard-growing second season of ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' switched away from dealing with the Christian Church in season one Season 1 and into dealing with Wicca, started to grow the characters as both people and sisters and added the plotlines of Piper and Leo, Phoebe and college, and Prue's new power.
** Some believe the show didn't fully hit its stride until the third season when it introduced Phoebe's first long term love interest in the half demon/half human half-demon/half-human Cole [[spoiler: a.k.a. Belthazor]], and The Source became the new primary new villain, making the show much more heavily arc driven.



* ''Series/{{Community}}'' started growing stubble in the first season with ninth episode, [[Recap/CommunityS1E09Debate109 "Debate 109"]]. The beard, of course, became fully grown with [[Recap/CommunityS1E23ModernWarfare "Modern Warfare"]] (note: while [[Recap/CommunityS1E21ContemporaryAmericanPoultry "Contemporary American Poultry"]] aired two episodes before "Warfare" and was thus the show's first high-concept episode, it got considerably less press than its successor).
** In the first episode of season 3, Dean Pelton showed up for the new school year sporting a manly new beard and vowing that things were going to be different this year. By the end of the episode, his beard had been forcibly shaved off, and he was forced to sadly admit that this year was going to be the same as last year, but without money. Given the show's constant trope-awareness, this is assuredly a lampshading of this particular trope.

to:

* ''Series/{{Community}}'' ''Series/{{Community}}'':
** It
started growing stubble in the first season with the ninth episode, [[Recap/CommunityS1E09Debate109 "Debate 109"]]. The beard, of course, became fully grown with [[Recap/CommunityS1E23ModernWarfare "Modern Warfare"]] (note: while [[Recap/CommunityS1E21ContemporaryAmericanPoultry "Contemporary American Poultry"]] aired two episodes before "Warfare" and was thus the show's first high-concept episode, it got considerably less press than its successor).
** In the first episode of season Season 3, Dean Pelton showed up for the new school year sporting a manly new beard and vowing that things were going to be different this year. By the end of the episode, his beard had been forcibly shaved off, and he was forced to sadly admit that this year was going to be the same as last year, but without money. Given the show's constant trope-awareness, this is assuredly a lampshading of this particular trope.



* ''Series/TheDailyShow'', when it started out in 1996 with Craig Kilborn, made fun of the news media but it didn't have any particular focus; it seemed like a generic news-parody show, or basically Creator/ComedyCentral's [[FollowTheLeader answer to]] [[TheSoup Talk Soup]]. Jon Stewart's arrival in January 1999 changed everything, as Stewart's vision of the show was less about mocking celebrities and their scandals and more about hard-hitting political satire with a left-wing slant, which led to the show becoming more serious-minded with its humor and interviews. This last bit began to attract major political figures, elected and retired, to the show to be interviewed by Stewart, who evolved into quite the capable interviewer; notably, three sitting heads of state (Presidents Pervez Musharraf of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}} in September 2006, [[IronLady Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf]] of UsefulNotes/{{Liberia}} in April 2009, and ''freakin' '''UsefulNotes/BarackObama''''' in October 2010) have sat down with him.

to:

* ''Series/TheDailyShow'', when ''Series/TheDailyShow'':
** When
it started out in 1996 with Craig Kilborn, it made fun of the news media but it didn't have any particular focus; it seemed like a generic news-parody show, or basically Creator/ComedyCentral's [[FollowTheLeader answer to]] [[TheSoup Talk Soup]]. Jon Stewart's arrival in January 1999 changed everything, as Stewart's vision of the show was less about mocking celebrities and their scandals and more about hard-hitting political satire with a left-wing slant, which led to the show becoming more serious-minded with its humor and interviews. This last bit began to attract major political figures, elected and retired, to the show to be interviewed by Stewart, who evolved into quite the capable interviewer; notably, three sitting heads of state (Presidents Pervez Musharraf of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}} in September 2006, [[IronLady Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf]] of UsefulNotes/{{Liberia}} in April 2009, and ''freakin' '''UsefulNotes/BarackObama''''' in October 2010) have sat down with him.



** This has even been lampshaded many times by the people behind the show.

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** This has even been lampshaded {{lampshade| hanging}}d many times by the people behind the show.



* This basically '''killed''' ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' in Australia. The Nine Network hyped ''Farscape'' to the point of stupidity, then put it on in prime time. Unfortunately, the series was [[HypeBacklash slow to build]], with Crichton in particular starting off as an annoying putz. The ratings slumped dramatically and Nine began to bounce it about from timeslot to timeslot and play episodes out of order.

to:

* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
**
This basically '''killed''' ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' it in Australia. The Nine Network hyped ''Farscape'' to the point of stupidity, then put it on in prime time. Unfortunately, the series was [[HypeBacklash slow to build]], with Crichton in particular starting off as an annoying putz. The ratings slumped dramatically and Nine began to bounce it about from timeslot to timeslot and play episodes out of order.



** Where it stopped becoming a 'human in alien environment' gig and started becoming DarkerAndEdgier was around the episode "A human reaction" where John encounters the ancients (which is also about the time the MindScrew kicked in). This set the point where the show started GrowingTheBeard at lightspeed.

to:

** Where it stopped becoming a 'human in alien environment' gig and started becoming DarkerAndEdgier was around the episode "A human reaction" Human Reaction" where John encounters the ancients (which is also about the time the MindScrew kicked in). This set the point where the show started GrowingTheBeard at lightspeed.



* ''Series/TheFlash2014'' started out better than ''Series/Arrow'' but still suffered from the same issue that show did: villains. Weather Wizard was hammy and killed off, as was Multiplex and Mist. But then Episode 4 came and with it... Captain Cold. With it's introduction of a compelling villain, fractures in the Team Flash dynamic (with the reveal that Cisco had created the cold gun), great use of Felicity Smoak (who at this time had begun her descent into fan hatred on Arrow), and an ending promising more Rogues to appear, Episode 4 would begin growing the beard for the show
** The beard fully grew with ''Revenge of the Rogues'', which saw Heatwave appear, the Flash reveal himself to the world, and be the first episode to deal with the [[spoiler: Harrison Welles is the Reverse Flash]] reveal.
* ''Series/{{Flash Gordon|2007}}'' starting getting better half way through the first season.

to:

* ''Series/TheFlash2014'' ''Series/TheFlash2014'':
** It
started out better than ''Series/Arrow'' but still suffered from the same issue that show did: villains. Weather Wizard was hammy and killed off, as was were Multiplex and Mist. But then Episode 4 came and with it... Captain Cold. With it's its introduction of a compelling villain, fractures in the Team Flash dynamic (with the reveal that Cisco had created the cold gun), great use of Felicity Smoak (who at this time had begun her descent into fan hatred on Arrow), and an ending promising more Rogues to appear, Episode 4 would begin growing the beard for the show
show.
** The beard fully grew with ''Revenge of the Rogues'', which saw Heatwave appear, the Flash reveal himself to the world, and be the first episode to deal with the [[spoiler: Harrison Welles Wells is the Reverse Flash]] reveal.
* ''Series/{{Flash Gordon|2007}}'' starting getting better half way halfway through the first season.



* ''{{Series/Fringe}}'' grew its beard in the last third of season 2, starting with the episodes "Jacksonville" and "Peter".
** Others would argue it started as far back as "The Arrival" (season 1, episode 4), which introduced the Observers and put ''Fringe'' on the road to being something other than an ''X-Files'' clone.

to:

* ''{{Series/Fringe}}'' grew its beard in the last third of season Season 2, starting with the episodes "Jacksonville" and "Peter".
** Others would argue it started as far back as "The Arrival" (season (Season 1, episode 4), which introduced the Observers and put ''Fringe'' on the road to being something other than an ''X-Files'' clone.



* ''{{Series/Gotham}}'' Series 2 begins with the 'Rise of the Villains' arc. Rather than concentrating on 'supervillian origin' of the week stories, it's now much more serialized. Characters such as Bruce and Edward Nigma are now integrated into the main story involving the rise of new Big Bad Theo Galavan. We also begin to see the legacy of the joker take clearer shape. [[spoiler: Throwing Fish Mooney off the building.]] This seems to be the turning point, as less popular characters begin to get bumped off too.

to:

* ''{{Series/Gotham}}'' Series 2 begins with the 'Rise of the Villains' arc. Rather than concentrating on 'supervillian 'supervillain origin' of the week stories, it's now much more serialized. Characters such as Bruce and Edward Nigma are now integrated into the main story involving the rise of new Big Bad Theo Galavan. We also begin to see the legacy of the joker Joker take clearer shape. [[spoiler: Throwing Fish Mooney off the building.]] This seems to be the turning point, as less popular characters begin to get bumped off too.



* ''{{Series/Justified}}'' started off very "villain of the week", with a couple main cast members regularly absent, but it really grew the beard in season 2, which focused mostly on a single, powerful villain (or in this case a family of them), though the last few episodes of the first season saw some proverbial stubble popping up.
* ''Series/KamenRider'' started as a weekly horror superhero show about a lonely hero that fights an organization that creates evil monsters and is made from old nazis. The emphasis was around the many evil plots of Shocker and the angst the tormented hero goes through, with little support from his comrades. After the accident Hiroshi Fujioka had, the lead man is changed, add that the changes producer Toru Hirayama did: Introducing a completely new supporting cast that was a bit more comedic and casual, having Tobei Tachibana manage the Tachibana Racing Club and adding more emphasis on the action. Slowly, it turned into an amazing story where a guy fights evil monsters that blow up when defeated with heavy support from his comrades, and even though the tormented hero aspect was still there, the support of his comrades and positive attitude of saving the day proved how much the show evolved. It went off to spawn many sequels and eventually [[Franchise/SuperSentai an entire franchise]].
* ''Series/TheLastManOnEarth'' started out strong as a [[AfterTheEnd post-apocalyptic comedy]] with an [[MinimalistCast intriguing]] [[TheLastManHeardAKnock concept]], but began to go downhill in the middle of season one. It cast aside its original premise for [[ArcFatigue bog-standard sex-comedy]] plots, and its main character grew into an UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist. The show returned for its second season noticeably improved and it started to gain critical notice for its [[{{Retool}} increased focus]] on its post-apocalyptic setting, its strong EnsembleCast and previously unlikeable characters undergoing significant CharacterDevelopment. The show may not [[GenreShift resemble the idea that was originally pitched]], but it has long since shorn its TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot reputation.

to:

* ''{{Series/Justified}}'' started off very "villain of the week", with a couple main cast members regularly absent, but it really grew the beard in season Season 2, which focused mostly on a single, powerful villain (or in this case a family of them), though the last few episodes of the first season saw some proverbial stubble popping up.
* ''Series/KamenRider'' started as a weekly horror superhero show about a lonely hero that fights an organization that creates evil monsters and is made from old nazis.Nazis. The emphasis was around the many evil plots of Shocker and the angst the tormented hero goes through, with little support from his comrades. After the accident Hiroshi Fujioka had, the lead man is changed, add that the changes producer Toru Hirayama did: Introducing a completely new supporting cast that was a bit more comedic and casual, having Tobei Tachibana manage the Tachibana Racing Club and adding more emphasis on the action. Slowly, it turned into an amazing story where a guy fights evil monsters that blow up when defeated with heavy support from his comrades, and even though the tormented hero aspect was still there, the support of his comrades and positive attitude of saving the day proved how much the show evolved. It went off to spawn many sequels and eventually [[Franchise/SuperSentai an entire franchise]].
* ''Series/TheLastManOnEarth'' started out strong as a [[AfterTheEnd post-apocalyptic comedy]] with an [[MinimalistCast intriguing]] [[TheLastManHeardAKnock concept]], but began to go downhill in the middle of season one.Season 1. It cast aside its original premise for [[ArcFatigue bog-standard sex-comedy]] plots, and its main character grew into an UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist. The show returned for its second season noticeably improved and it started to gain critical notice for its [[{{Retool}} increased focus]] on its post-apocalyptic setting, its strong EnsembleCast and previously unlikeable characters undergoing significant CharacterDevelopment. The show may not [[GenreShift resemble the idea that was originally pitched]], but it has long since shorn its TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot reputation.



* ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'': The first season was considered a fun time travel show that managed to enjoy itself despite getting caught up in an unnecessarily ambitious MythArc and [[StrangledByTheRedString some bad romances]]. Season 2 proved itself to have learned its lesson from the very first episode; the show simply became about watching the Legends romp through history and punch out Nazis, with far less unnecessary drama and contradictory time travel mechanics. Even the MythArc exists primarily to justify letting the cast fight various famous historical villains.

to:

* ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'': The first season was considered a fun time travel show that managed to enjoy itself despite getting caught up in an unnecessarily ambitious unnecessarily-ambitious MythArc and [[StrangledByTheRedString some bad romances]]. Season 2 proved itself to have learned its lesson from the very first episode; the show simply became about watching the Legends romp through history and punch out Nazis, with far less unnecessary drama and contradictory time travel time-travel mechanics. Even the MythArc exists primarily to justify letting the cast fight various famous historical villains.



* The first Season of ''Series/MadMen'' is quality television but it is in season two that characters become more developed, stories become more focused, the changes of the era come into play more and the actors are given more to work with. Kinsey also grows an Orson Welles beard.
** Critics would argue that Nixon vs. Kennedy at the end of the first season was the real turning point for the show. Mr. Campbell, who cares.. indeed.

to:

* The first Season season of ''Series/MadMen'' is quality television but it is in season two Season 2 that characters become more developed, stories become more focused, the changes of the era come into play more and the actors are given more to work with. Kinsey also grows an Orson Welles beard.
** Critics would argue that Nixon vs. Kennedy at the end of the first season was the real turning point for the show. Mr. Campbell, who cares..cares... indeed.



* ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'' is a rather bizarre example in the sense that it started out more subtle and down-to-earth, but actually dramatically improved when the show became more wacky, to the point where it basically became a live-action cartoon, while it still retained most of its core themes and jokes. A rare case of {{Flanderization}} actually improving the show's overall quality.

to:

* ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'' ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'':
** This
is a rather bizarre example in the sense that it started out more subtle and down-to-earth, but actually dramatically improved when the show became more wacky, to the point where it basically became a live-action cartoon, while it still retained most of its core themes and jokes. A It's a rare case of {{Flanderization}} actually improving the ''improving'' a show's overall quality.



* The general consensus is that ''Series/{{Merlin 2008}}'' grew the beard around episode eight, which, along with the five episodes which followed it, was noticeably darker in tone than the first part of the series. A lot of fans identify it as the point at which the show stopped being a GuiltyPleasure.

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* The general consensus is that ''Series/{{Merlin 2008}}'' grew the beard around episode eight, 8, which, along with the five episodes which followed it, was noticeably darker in tone than the first part of the series. A lot of fans identify it as the point at which the show stopped being a GuiltyPleasure.



* ''Series/TheMuppetShow'' was ''funny'' from day one, but it wasn't until the second season that a lot of the main characters' personalities and appearances really jelled; season one Fozzie was a borderline JerkAss, Gonzo was a pathetic little [[TheWoobie nebbish]], and Miss Piggy was, literally, more two-dimensional (she was initially a background character and didn't even have a dedicated puppeteer). The better establishment of these characters also roughly coincided with a head writer change and resulting increased focus on the character-driven backstage plots rather than on-stage skits and running gags. There was also an upswing in guest stars after the show got popular; initially, the guest stars mostly came from Hollywood, but the appearance of ballet legend Rudolf Nureyev (at his request) gave the show an extraordinary amount of credibility, leading great performers in many fields to appear on the show.

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* ''Series/TheMuppetShow'' was ''funny'' from day one, but it wasn't until the second season that a lot of the main characters' personalities and appearances really jelled; season one Fozzie was a borderline JerkAss, {{Jerkass}}, Gonzo was a pathetic little [[TheWoobie nebbish]], and Miss Piggy was, literally, more two-dimensional (she was initially a background character and didn't even have a dedicated puppeteer). The better establishment of these characters also roughly coincided with a head writer change and the resulting increased focus on the character-driven backstage plots rather than on-stage skits and running gags. There was also an upswing in guest stars after the show got popular; initially, the guest stars mostly came from Hollywood, but the appearance of ballet legend Rudolf Nureyev (at his request) gave the show an extraordinary amount of credibility, leading great performers in many fields to appear on the show.



** ''Series/{{Newhart}}'s'' biggest problem was that the show's regular {{Jerkass}} was a [[TheScrappy painfully unfunny character]] named Kirk Devane. The show gained an attractive stubble in the second season when it switched to film and more importantly Stephanie joined the cast, but it was still saddled with Kirk. The show grew a full, beautiful beard at the start of the third season when Kirk was PutOnABus and [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute replaced]] by Michael who was actually a bigger {{Jerkass}} than Kirk, but was hilarious.

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** ''Series/{{Newhart}}'s'' biggest problem was that the show's regular {{Jerkass}} was a [[TheScrappy painfully unfunny painfully-unfunny character]] named Kirk Devane. The show gained an attractive stubble in the second season when it switched to film and and, more importantly importantly, Stephanie joined the cast, but it was still saddled with Kirk. The show grew a full, beautiful beard at the start of the third season when Kirk was PutOnABus and [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute replaced]] by Michael who was actually a bigger {{Jerkass}} than Kirk, but was hilarious.



* Though there were a few decent episodes in its first season, ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'' took a giant leap in quality when, starting with Season Two, it was filmed with three cameras and a live audience. Right from the second season's first episode, the show suddenly demonstrated more energy (and fun) as the cast fed on the live reactions of the audience.

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* Though there were a few decent episodes in its first season, ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'' took a giant leap in quality when, starting with Season Two, 2, it was filmed with three cameras and a live audience. Right from the second season's first episode, the show suddenly demonstrated more energy (and fun) as the cast fed on the live reactions of the audience.



* ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'' started out as an underwhelming clone of ''TheOffice'' (it's from the same creators) set in a government office instead of a corporate one. Luckily, it quickly developed past this, thanks in large part to Amy Poehler's portrayal of hopelessly naive and idealistic main character Leslie, and the emergence of Chris Pratt and Nick Offerman as [[BreakoutCharacter Breakout Characters]]. The show's all-inclusive political humor (poking fun at the workings of government without making any stances) helped set it apart too.

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* ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'' ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'':
** It
started out as an underwhelming clone of ''TheOffice'' ''Series/TheOffice'' (it's from the same creators) set in a government office instead of a corporate one. Luckily, it quickly developed past this, thanks in large part to Amy Poehler's Creator/AmyPoehler's portrayal of hopelessly naive and idealistic main character Leslie, and the emergence of Chris Pratt Creator/ChrisPratt and Nick Offerman as [[BreakoutCharacter Breakout Characters]].{{Breakout Character}}s. The show's all-inclusive political humor (poking fun at the workings of government without making any stances) helped set it apart too.



* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' began as [[Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers a show where]] a FiveManBand does humanitarian stuff around their school, fights the {{Mooks}}, then the MonsterOfTheWeek, and then goes back to school - StrictlyFormula. Starting with ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace'', plots became more complex and characters more human as it went on, and {{Card Carrying Villain}}s were replaced (to some extent) with villains with better-defined motivations. ''In Space'' is generally used as the template to which all later seasons owe their inspiration: a strong [[HalfArcSeason season]]-long StoryArc, aggressive CharacterDevelopment, some sort of romance on the side and culminating into a big GrandFinale.

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* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' began as [[Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers a show where]] show]] where a FiveManBand does humanitarian stuff around their school, fights the {{Mooks}}, then the MonsterOfTheWeek, and then goes back to school - StrictlyFormula. Starting with ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace'', plots became more complex and characters more human as it went on, and {{Card Carrying Villain}}s were replaced (to some extent) with villains with better-defined motivations. ''In Space'' is generally used as the template to which all later seasons owe their inspiration: a strong [[HalfArcSeason season]]-long StoryArc, aggressive CharacterDevelopment, some sort of romance on the side and culminating into a big GrandFinale.



* ''Series/PrisonBreak'' led off with some good episodes, but really grew the beard in the two-parter "Riots, Drills and the Devil" (episodes 6 and 7 of season one), which set the benchmark for all subsequent episodes in pace and tone. [[MagnificentBastard Robert Knepper's character T-Bag]] blackmailed his way into the escape plan, the Michael/Sara relationship really kicked off, most of the main characters got to show off the traits that would define them and drive the show for the rest of its run (Michael being the hero, Lincoln being brawny, etc), and the Evil Government Conspirators started taking a more active role in the fate of the protagonists.

to:

* ''Series/PrisonBreak'' led off with some good episodes, but really grew the beard in the two-parter "Riots, Drills and the Devil" (episodes 6 and 7 of season one), Season 1), which set the benchmark for all subsequent episodes in pace and tone. [[MagnificentBastard Robert Knepper's character T-Bag]] blackmailed his way into the escape plan, the Michael/Sara relationship really kicked off, most of the main characters got to show off the traits that would define them and drive the show for the rest of its run (Michael being the hero, Lincoln being brawny, etc), and the Evil Government Conspirators started taking a more active role in the fate of the protagonists.



** The series one finale of ''Series/RedDwarf'' ("Me^2") definitely stands out as a 'growing the beard' moment; it was the first real 'spotlight' episode for Arnold Rimmer and was the first time we got to crawl inside his head (via the subplot regarding Rimmer's final words before dying) towards Rimmer's inferiority complex and his deep-seeded self-loathing, leading to Rimmer becoming more of a sympathetic and fleshed out character.
* The second season of ''Series/RobinHood'' is generally considered of a much higher standard than the first, with a more consistent tone between episodes and better character development.

to:

** The series one Season 1 finale of ''Series/RedDwarf'' ("Me^2") definitely stands out as a 'growing the beard' moment; it was the first real 'spotlight' episode for Arnold Rimmer and was the first time we got to crawl inside his head (via the subplot regarding Rimmer's final words before dying) towards Rimmer's inferiority complex and his deep-seeded self-loathing, leading to Rimmer becoming more of a sympathetic and fleshed out fleshed-out character.
* The second season of ''Series/RobinHood'' is generally considered to be of a much higher standard than the first, with a more consistent tone between episodes and better character development.



* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'': The season one episode hosted by Creator/RichardPryor took the show from being a grungy, New York-style variety show into the edgy, late-night sketch comedy show where anything can happen (scripted or otherwise).

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* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'': The season one Season 1 episode hosted by Creator/RichardPryor took the show from being a grungy, New York-style variety show into the edgy, late-night sketch comedy show where anything can happen (scripted or otherwise).
27th Dec '16 4:01:46 PM nombretomado
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* The first season of ''AshesToAshes'' had a lighter feel to it, with Alex (in over-the-top 80s outfits) often treating her situation with a kind of detached amusement and e.g. Ray and Chris often used just for comic relief. Things improved a lot when the show adopted a more gritty serious-police feel in season 2. It grows it again in season 3. The previous three A2A villains ([[spoiler: Tim Price, Supermack, and Martin Summers]]) are revealed to all be [[DiscOneFinalBoss Disc One Final Bosses]]. The ''real'' BigBad, [[MagnificentBastard Jim]] [[DevilInPlainSight Keats]] shows up, unanswered questions from ''Series/{{Life On Mars|2006}}'' begin driving the plot, and Gene himself comes under scrutiny by Alex.

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* The first season of ''AshesToAshes'' ''Series/AshesToAshes'' had a lighter feel to it, with Alex (in over-the-top 80s outfits) often treating her situation with a kind of detached amusement and e.g. Ray and Chris often used just for comic relief. Things improved a lot when the show adopted a more gritty serious-police feel in season 2. It grows it again in season 3. The previous three A2A villains ([[spoiler: Tim Price, Supermack, and Martin Summers]]) are revealed to all be [[DiscOneFinalBoss Disc One Final Bosses]]. The ''real'' BigBad, [[MagnificentBastard Jim]] [[DevilInPlainSight Keats]] shows up, unanswered questions from ''Series/{{Life On Mars|2006}}'' begin driving the plot, and Gene himself comes under scrutiny by Alex.
26th Dec '16 8:02:57 PM PaulA
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* ''Series/FlashGordon'' starting getting better half way through the first season.

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* ''Series/FlashGordon'' ''Series/{{Flash Gordon|2007}}'' starting getting better half way through the first season.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=GrowingTheBeard.LiveActionTV