History GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff / Technology

15th Oct '17 12:13:05 AM LeonardoRegulus
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* BlackBerry smartphones were moderately successful in its home country of the US, largely due to its rather advanced encryption capabilities at the time. In the late 00s/early 10s, however, BlackBerry phones were so ridiculously popular in Indonesia that they essentially became a status symbol; anybody who's an anybody (students, taxi drivers, street vendors, CEOs, civil servants, celebrities, housemaids, [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers petty thieves...]]) owns a BlackBerry phone.

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* BlackBerry [=BlackBerry=] smartphones were moderately successful in its home country of the US, largely due to its rather advanced encryption capabilities at the time. In the late 00s/early 10s, however, BlackBerry [=BlackBerry=] phones were so ridiculously popular in Indonesia that they essentially became a status symbol; anybody who's an anybody (students, taxi drivers, street vendors, CEOs, [=CEOs=], doctors, civil servants, celebrities, housemaids, [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers petty thieves...]]) owns owned a BlackBerry [=BlackBerry=] phone.
15th Oct '17 12:11:25 AM LeonardoRegulus
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* BlackBerry smartphones were moderately successful in its home country of the US, largely due to its rather advanced encryption capabilities at the time. In the late 00s/early 10s, however, BlackBerry phones were so ridiculously popular in Indonesia that they essentially became a status symbol; anybody who's an anybody (students, taxi drivers, street vendors, CEOs, civil servants, celebrities, housemaids, [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers petty thieves...]]) owns a BlackBerry phone.
14th Oct '17 10:55:35 AM DecafGrub47393
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* The Laserdisc optical disc format was developed by Dutch corporation Phillips, and produced by Phillips and American corporation MCA. It never caught on in the US or Europe due to the cost and read-only nature; but became the dominant video format in Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and the more affluent regions of Southeast Asia. Production of laserdiscs continued until the end of 2001, in Japan; and production of players continued to the beginning of 2009, also in Japan. They are still popular with collectors, due to the number of films on laserdisc which have never been released on DVD, and the increasing scarcity of playable VHS releases.

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* The Laserdisc optical disc format was developed by Dutch corporation Phillips, and produced by Phillips and American corporation MCA. It never caught on in the US or Europe due to the cost and read-only nature; but became the dominant video format in Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and the more affluent regions of Southeast Asia.Asia, while catching on in America by 1988. Production of laserdiscs continued until the end of 2001, in Japan; and production of players continued to the beginning of 2009, also in Japan. They are still popular with collectors, due to the number of films on laserdisc which have never been released on DVD, and the increasing scarcity of playable VHS releases.
27th Sep '17 10:15:51 PM superidiotman00
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* American-made iOS virtual instrument app [=GeoShred=] is disproportionately used by Indian musicians, who benefit from the app's ability to play microtonally. As a result, several updates have boasted features geared in part toward Indian-style music, such support for non-Western scale intonations (including a huge number of Indian classical raga presets) and a sitar resonator effect.
16th Sep '17 5:26:50 PM nombretomado
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* FM radio was a lot quicker to catch on in Europe than the U.S., where it was invented, because the postwar AM airwaves were so crowded (by [[YanksWithTanks Armed Forces Network]] and [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar Radio Free Europe]] stations). Germany had only a handful of AM frequencies available, but plenty of room for FM. Stations started popping up in the 1940s and 1950s, where FM really only took off in the U.S. with the rise of the counterculture movement in the '60s and '70s and the desire for higher-quality sound for all the new rock stations.

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* FM radio was a lot quicker to catch on in Europe than the U.S., where it was invented, because the postwar AM airwaves were so crowded (by [[YanksWithTanks [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks Armed Forces Network]] and [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar Radio Free Europe]] stations). Germany had only a handful of AM frequencies available, but plenty of room for FM. Stations started popping up in the 1940s and 1950s, where FM really only took off in the U.S. with the rise of the counterculture movement in the '60s and '70s and the desire for higher-quality sound for all the new rock stations.
6th Sep '17 5:53:47 AM DecafGrub47393
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* While the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} was big in its native U.S., it was massive in Europe, selling in huge numbers when Americans moved onto cheap UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer clones.

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* While the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} was big in its native U.S., it was massive in Europe, selling in huge numbers when Americans moved onto cheap UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer clones.clones or the NES.
5th Aug '17 5:27:22 AM Jhonny
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* Bombardier is a Canadian company that produces a wide range of stuff, including regional airplanes, trains and - the stuff they started out with - snow mobiles. However, the overwhelming majority of their trains are bought by European countries. This is in part because demand for trains is not all that high in Canada and in part because big parts of Bombardier's rail division are actually former European manufacturers that Bombardier bought up with the factories and many of the patents still in use.
5th Aug '17 5:25:07 AM Jhonny
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* Railways were first invented in Great Britain and while it is hard to figure out who first made trains go with electricity, it's safe to say it ''wasn't'' a Swiss person. Which country has the highest per capita rail ridership and the longest electrified network for its land area? Switzerland. To say Swiss people like trains would be a gross misrepresentation of the facts. One in four Swiss people has a half fare card, which means they pay to get reduced fares (which of course only makes sense if you take the train a lot). Major (expensive) rail expansion proposals are put to a vote on a regular basis. They almost always pass with flying colors. Compare this to Britain, which had the [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Beeching Axe]] in the 1960s that cut the network in half almost overnight and has not fully recovered since in terms of rail travel. Switzerland is also seen as the AlwaysSomeoneBetter to UsefulNotes/DeutscheBahn by Germans when they complain about the (real or perceived) ills of their railway, which is itself highly regarded by non-Germans and often mentioned as one of the highlights of their trips by transatlantic visitors.

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* Railways were first invented in Great Britain and while it is hard to figure out who first made trains go with electricity, it's safe to say it ''wasn't'' a Swiss person. Which country has the highest per capita rail ridership and the longest electrified network for its land area? Switzerland. To say Swiss people like trains would be a gross misrepresentation understatement of the facts. One in four Swiss people has a half fare card, which means they pay to get reduced fares (which of course only makes sense if you take the train a lot). Major (expensive) rail expansion proposals are put to a vote on a regular basis. They almost always pass with flying colors. Compare this to Britain, which had the [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Beeching Axe]] in the 1960s that cut the network in half almost overnight and has not fully recovered since in terms of rail travel. Switzerland is also seen as the AlwaysSomeoneBetter to UsefulNotes/DeutscheBahn by Germans when they complain about the (real or perceived) ills of their railway, which is itself highly regarded by non-Germans and often mentioned as one of the highlights of their trips by transatlantic visitors.
5th Aug '17 5:23:15 AM Jhonny
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* Speaking of which, the ZX Spectrum was a success in the UK as a budget home computer but never really broke into the business sector, being something of a PoorMansSubstitute for higher-spec competitors like the UsefulNotes/BBCMicro. But in Russia and Eastern Europe it (or at least its various clones) enjoyed a virtual monopoly; its off-the-shelf components and broad manufacturing tolerances[[note]]legend has it that Sinclair sometimes used capacitors that had failed their manufacturer's quality-control process and were going to landfill![[/note]] made it easy to produce even for the decidedly unimpressive Soviet semiconductor industry, and the simple design could be repaired by anyone who could work a soldering iron. They stayed in regular use until a good ten years after British techies had moved on to IBM PCs and their various clones, and the embedded variant developed for controlling industrial machinery is still in limited production to this day.

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* Speaking of which, the ZX Spectrum was a success in the UK as a budget home computer but never really broke into the business sector, being something of a PoorMansSubstitute for higher-spec competitors like the UsefulNotes/BBCMicro. But in Russia and Eastern Europe it (or at least its various clones) enjoyed a virtual monopoly; its off-the-shelf components and broad manufacturing tolerances[[note]]legend has it that Sinclair sometimes used capacitors that had failed their manufacturer's quality-control process and were going to landfill![[/note]] made it easy to produce even for the decidedly unimpressive Soviet semiconductor industry, and the simple design could be repaired by anyone who could work a soldering iron. They stayed in regular use until a good ten years after British techies had moved on to IBM PCs [=PCs=] and their various clones, and the embedded variant developed for controlling industrial machinery is still in limited production to this day.
5th Aug '17 5:22:50 AM Jhonny
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* The Boeing 747 is more popular with Asian and European airlines than with U.S. carriers (only two active US airlines, United Airlines and Delta Airlines, have aging Boeing 747-400s in their fleet with plans to retire them). There are [[NeverAcceptedInHisHometown no American airlines that have ordered the latest incarnation]], the 747-8 (which combines the iconic hump design of the 747 with the technologies of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner), and the largest fleet of passenger 747-8s is, ironically, that of Germany's flag carrier Lufthansa. This is because in modern terms the 747, with its 4 engines, is far less fuel efficient compared to smaller planes of these day such as Boeing 777 or Airbus A320. As a result it is only really practical for cargo, or when transporting ''large'' numbers of passengers became an absolute necessity--for example, the trans-Pacific routes in Asia which has always been the bread and butter of Asian airlines.

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* The Boeing 747 is more popular with Asian and European airlines than with U.S. carriers (only two active US airlines, United Airlines and Delta Airlines, have aging Boeing 747-400s in their fleet with plans to retire them). There are [[NeverAcceptedInHisHometown no American airlines that have ordered the latest incarnation]], the 747-8 (which combines the iconic hump design of the 747 with the technologies of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner), and the largest fleet of passenger 747-8s is, ironically, that of Germany's flag carrier Lufthansa. This is because in modern terms the 747, with its 4 engines, is far less fuel efficient compared to smaller planes of these day such as Boeing 777 or Airbus A320. As a result it is only really practical for cargo, or when transporting ''large'' numbers of passengers became an absolute necessity--for example, the trans-Pacific routes in Asia which has always been the bread and butter of Asian airlines. Similarly, Ryanair - either Europe's largest or its second largest airline, depending on how and what you count - has an all Boeing fleet, despite being an Irish / English airline.
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