History GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff / Technology

24th Dec '15 6:20:52 PM Prfnoff
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* UsefulNotes/Atari8BitComputers, years after they had begun to fade from popularity in the US, caught on in Poland, of all countries.
2nd Dec '15 5:32:31 PM nombretomado
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* Sega's 8-bit system, the SegaMasterSystem, failed to compete head-on with the original NintendoEntertainmentSystem in both the United States and Japan; it wasn't until their release of the SegaGenesis that the infamous rivalry began. However, the Master System sold very well in both Europe and Brazil.
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* Sega's 8-bit system, the SegaMasterSystem, UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem, failed to compete head-on with the original NintendoEntertainmentSystem in both the United States and Japan; it wasn't until their release of the SegaGenesis UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis that the infamous rivalry began. However, the Master System sold very well in both Europe and Brazil.
30th Nov '15 2:06:21 AM Khathi
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* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. Amazon, while huge in its native U.S., is one of the biggest retailers there along with home-grown shopping sites like Rakuten, which also has an extensive international reach of its own. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. Most Japanese large stores even have a special service counter where you can order the item to be shipped even if you bought it by directly visiting the store, and even those little mom-and-pop shops will call the delivery service if asked. * GPS apps and navigation devices are popular in Japan because the streets are often unnamed, and the buildings are numbered by the order they're built within the block rather than sequentially along the street makes navigation daunting even for natives. It reaches the point that even the classified ads almost always include the little maps outlaying the route from the nearest landmark such as a convenince store, bus stop or train station.
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* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. Amazon, while huge in its native U.S., is one of the biggest retailers there along with home-grown shopping sites like Rakuten, which also has an extensive international reach of its own. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. Most Japanese large stores even have a special service counter where you can order the item to be shipped even if you bought it by directly visiting the store, and even those little mom-and-pop shops will call the delivery service if asked. * GPS apps and navigation devices are popular in Japan because the streets are often unnamed, and the buildings are numbered by the order they're built within the block rather than sequentially along the street street, which makes navigation daunting even for natives. It reaches the point that even the classified ads almost always include the little maps outlaying the route from the nearest landmark such as a convenince convenience store, bus stop or train station.station. Online navigation fills this niche so nicely that [[TechnologyMarchesOn it's hard to imagine how the people had lived before]].
28th Nov '15 3:04:19 PM DavidDelony
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* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. Amazon, while huge in its native U.S., is one of the biggest retailers there along with home-grown shopping sites like Rakuten, which also has an extensive international reach of its own. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. Most Japanese large stores even have the special service counter where you can order the item to be shipped even if you bought it by directly visiting the store, and even those little mom-and-pop shops will call the delivery service if asked.
to:
* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. Amazon, while huge in its native U.S., is one of the biggest retailers there along with home-grown shopping sites like Rakuten, which also has an extensive international reach of its own. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. Most Japanese large stores even have the a special service counter where you can order the item to be shipped even if you bought it by directly visiting the store, and even those little mom-and-pop shops will call the delivery service if asked.
28th Nov '15 3:01:58 PM DavidDelony
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* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. Amazon, while huge in its native U.S., is also very popular along with home-grown shopping sites like Rakuten, which also has an extensive international reach of its own. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. Most Japanese large stores even have the special service counter where you can order the item to be shipped even if you bought it by directly visiting the store, and even those little mom-and-pop shops will call the delivery service if asked.
to:
* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. Amazon, while huge in its native U.S., is also very popular one of the biggest retailers there along with home-grown shopping sites like Rakuten, which also has an extensive international reach of its own. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. Most Japanese large stores even have the special service counter where you can order the item to be shipped even if you bought it by directly visiting the store, and even those little mom-and-pop shops will call the delivery service if asked.
28th Nov '15 12:29:31 PM DavidDelony
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* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. Most Japanese large stores even have the special service counter where you can order the item to be shipped even if you bought it by directly visiting the store, and even those little mom-and-pop shops will call the delivery service if asked.
to:
* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. Amazon, while huge in its native U.S., is also very popular along with home-grown shopping sites like Rakuten, which also has an extensive international reach of its own. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. Most Japanese large stores even have the special service counter where you can order the item to be shipped even if you bought it by directly visiting the store, and even those little mom-and-pop shops will call the delivery service if asked.
28th Nov '15 7:41:53 AM Khathi
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* And continuing with the motoring Russians, they absolutely ''love'' Nissan Juke. A unique combination of the car's cute and cheeky design breaking the monotony of the featureless modern [=SUVs=], its small size being inherently practical on the jam-packed Russian roads, and its SUV heritage making navigating those roads somewhat easier, struck a note in a Russian heart that just makes it irresistible, despite being rather expensive for its size.

* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. * GPS apps and navigation devices are popular in Japan because the way streets are laid out and buildings are numbered by the order they're built rather than sequentially makes navigation daunting even for natives.
to:
* Online shopping is very popular in Japan, likely due to a lot of people not owning cars. It's a lot easier to have bulky/heavy items delivered than to borrow someone's car, pay the steep parking and gas fees or to attempt to take these items home on the crowded trains. trains. Most Japanese large stores even have the special service counter where you can order the item to be shipped even if you bought it by directly visiting the store, and even those little mom-and-pop shops will call the delivery service if asked. * GPS apps and navigation devices are popular in Japan because the way streets are laid out often unnamed, and the buildings are numbered by the order they're built within the block rather than sequentially along the street makes navigation daunting even for natives.natives. It reaches the point that even the classified ads almost always include the little maps outlaying the route from the nearest landmark such as a convenince store, bus stop or train station.
26th Nov '15 6:14:39 PM Prfnoff
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* The UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC was more successful in France than in the United Kingdom. The majority of all French computer game developers made most of their output for the Amstrad CPC Platform. A choice UK video game developers never would do as that computer is not nearly as successful as the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} and the UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum in its native home country. This is also the reason why [[NoExportForYou some of the best titles for that computer are only available in France.]]
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* The UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC was more successful in France than in the United Kingdom. its native UK. The majority of all French computer game developers in the 1980s made most of their output for the Amstrad CPC Platform. A choice UK video the primary or secondary platform (usually behind the UsefulNotes/AtariST) for most of their output; while many British game developers never would do as that computer is not nearly as successful as companies also supported the CPC, they ranked it distinctly behind the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} and the UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum in its native home country.among 8-bit platforms, and their CPC releases were all too often poorly colored conversions of Speccy games. This is also the reason why [[NoExportForYou some of the best titles for that computer are only available in France.]]]] (The other big foreign market for the Amstrad CPC was in Spain, where it easily outsold the Commodore 64.)
7th Nov '15 4:05:49 AM Khathi
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* The Bell P-39 Airacobra was loathed by USAAF servicemen of both theaters... The Soviets on the other hand found great use for it due to the 37mm cannon being useful against German ground units. So much so that the Soviets loved it so much that its successor, the P-63 Kingcobra, was built mostly for the Red Air Force and barely went into service in the United States.
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* The Bell P-39 Airacobra was loathed by USAAF servicemen of both theaters... The Soviets on the other hand found great use for it due to the 37mm cannon being useful against German ground units. So much so that units, and its lackluster high-altitude performance being of no concern in the mostly low-altitude aerial combat on the Eastern Front. The Soviets loved it so much that its successor, the P-63 Kingcobra, was built mostly for the Red Air Force and barely went into service in the United States.
16th Oct '15 11:47:10 PM DavidDelony
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** Similarly, the [=VideoCD=] (not to be confused with the incompatible CD-Video format). It was extremely popular in exactly one continent: Asia. Due to its low price and region-free nature, it was widely used in Asia and even today, Videos are often released in [=VideoCD=], DVD and Blu-Ray formats. In the US and Europe, it failed to catch on, as it was released roughly three years before [=DVDs=] entered the market, and featured almost no copy-protection (if the disc does have copy-protection, it's trivially easy to bypass) and is completely region-free, making the format extremely undesirable to film studios. Feature wise, the requirement of switching discs midway through a film, the inability to store closed captioning and inability to store a second audio track without sacrificing quality (you could only either have two mono audio tracks or a stereo one) put off many consumers. The video and audio quality was only marginally better than VHS, and this was with discs mastered under ideal circumstances.
to:
** Similarly, the [=VideoCD=] (not to be confused with the incompatible CD-Video format). It was extremely popular in exactly one continent: Asia. Due to its low price and region-free nature, it was widely used in Asia and even today, Videos are often released in [=VideoCD=], DVD and Blu-Ray formats. In the US and Europe, it failed to catch on, as it was released roughly three years before [=DVDs=] entered the market, and featured almost no copy-protection (if the disc does have copy-protection, it's trivially easy to bypass) and is completely region-free, making the format extremely undesirable to film studios. Feature wise, the requirement of switching discs midway through a film, the inability to store closed captioning and inability to store a second audio track without sacrificing quality (you could only either have two mono audio tracks or a stereo one) put off many consumers. The video and audio quality was only marginally better than VHS, and this was with discs mastered under ideal circumstances.
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