History GameBreaker / GameShow

15th Jul '16 6:23:01 PM WarioBarker
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** '''That's Too Much!''': The correct answer is neither the first- nor 10th-given price. [[note]](For a short time during the 2008-09 season, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Roger Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8; the production staff let up when fans complained.)[[/note]]

to:

** '''That's Too Much!''': The correct answer is neither the first- nor 10th-given price. [[note]](For a short time during the 2008-09 season, between 2008 and 2010, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Roger Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8; the production staff let up when fans complained.)[[/note]])[[/note]]



** The Final Spin of the Speed-Up round can zig-zag this. Originally, its value was just whatever dollar amount the host landed on, thus leading to many cases where a contestant had enough of a lead that his opponents had no chance of victory. (Can't build much traction at, say, $300 per letter.) This was counterbalanced somewhat by adding $1,000 to the value of the Final Spin, but even before ''that'' rule change, the Final Spin could become a game breaker if he hits $5,000 (or $2,000 on daytime). Over the years, many a contestant has managed to pull a come-from-behind victory on a $5,000- or $6,000-per-letter Speed-Up, including many who have actually gone from ''no money whatsoever'' to victory thanks entirely to said round.
** In a non puzzle-related example, there used to be a Free Spin wedge on the Wheel. Countless contestants ended up banking large numbers of Free Spins due to hitting the wedge repeatedly, thus ensuring greater chances of keeping the Wheel out of their opponents' hands. A Summer 1986 daytime episode had the yellow contestant rack up ''five'' Free Spins and use them in Round 2, resulting in Round 3 beginning as a Speed-Up for $2,000/consonant and the '''blue''' player won thanks to a $2,000-per-letter Speed-Up. This was finally circumvented by reducing Free Spin to a single disc placed over a dollar amount. It was later retired for Free ''Play'', a wedge which allows the contestant to make any move without penalty, or the chance at one free vowel.
*** The Free Play itself has become a major game-breaker. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBAX_M6t-6o One guy landed on the space 5 times in a row]] [[LoopholeAbuse and used it to steal all 5 vowels]], and even besides that, when a player lands on it, [[ComplacentGamingSyndrome they will always immediately jump on the vowels]] without any regard for the possibility of an extra $500 for a consonant...probably because "use Free Play for vowels" is hammered into them by the show's contestant coordinators.

to:

** The Final Spin of the Speed-Up round can zig-zag this. Originally, its value was just whatever dollar amount the host landed on, thus leading to many cases where a contestant had enough of a lead that his opponents had no chance of victory. (Can't build much traction at, say, $300 per letter.) This was counterbalanced somewhat by adding $1,000 to the value of the Final Spin, Spin in 1999, but even before ''that'' rule change, the Final Spin could become a game breaker if he hits $5,000 (or the host hit the top value ($5,000 in nighttime, $2,000 on daytime).for most of the daytime run). Over the years, many a contestant has managed to pull a come-from-behind victory on a $5,000- or $6,000-per-letter Speed-Up, including many who have actually gone from ''no money whatsoever'' to victory thanks entirely to said round.
** In a non puzzle-related example, there used to be a Free Spin wedge on the Wheel. Countless contestants ended up banking large numbers of Free Spins due to hitting the wedge repeatedly, thus ensuring greater chances of keeping the Wheel out of their opponents' hands. A Summer 1986 mid-1986 daytime episode had the yellow contestant rack up ''five'' Free Spins and use them in Round 2, resulting in Round 3 beginning as a Speed-Up for $2,000/consonant and the '''blue''' player won thanks to a $2,000-per-letter Speed-Up. This was finally circumvented in October 1989 by reducing Free Spin to a single disc placed over a dollar amount. It was later retired for Free ''Play'', a wedge which allows the contestant to make any move without penalty, or the chance at one free vowel.
*** The Free Play itself has become a major game-breaker. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBAX_M6t-6o One guy landed on the space 5 five times in a row]] [[LoopholeAbuse and used it to steal call all 5 five vowels]], and even besides that, when a player lands on it, [[ComplacentGamingSyndrome they will always immediately jump on the vowels]] without any regard for the possibility of an extra $500 for a consonant...consonant or a free attempt at solving the puzzle...probably because "use Free Play for vowels" is hammered into them by the show's contestant coordinators.



* For the Head-To-Head Match portion of ''Series/MatchGame'', contestants chose one panelist to work with. Richard Dawson was so good at matching that nearly everyone picked him, so the fed-up producers added the Star Wheel in June 1978.

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* For the Head-To-Head Match portion of ''Series/MatchGame'', contestants chose one panelist to work with. Richard Dawson was so good at matching that nearly everyone picked him, so the fed-up producers added a rule in 1975 that barred champs from picking any celeb for consecutive Head-To-Head Matches. This was discarded later that year, with the Star Wheel added in June 1978.1978.
24th Apr '16 9:48:03 PM WarioBarker
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* ''Series/TicTacDough'' had several "red box" categories which allowed a contestant to gain an overwhelming upper hand almost immediately, if played correctly. The most notable of these were...

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* ''Series/TicTacDough'' had several "red box" categories which allowed a contestant to gain an overwhelming upper hand almost immediately, if played correctly. The most notable of these were...were:



* Michael Larson, a contestant on the game show ''Series/PressYourLuck''. He ''memorized'' the patterns that the board revolves around ahead of time, and became the biggest winner in the show's history by a huge margin ($110,237 in cash and prizes). Immediately after this, the patterns were changed to prevent another such incident, and CBS refused to allow anyone to air the episodes (yes, his taping actually took so long they had to edit it into a two-parter) on TV for nearly 20 years. To put this into perspective, that was the most anyone had won on U.S. TV in a single game until ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' debuted in 1999.
* Until 2003, ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' champions could win up to five games before being retired. Starting in the 2003-04 season, the producers instituted a "sky's the limit" rule where champions could go on and on winning until being defeated. Towards the season's end, Ken Jennings came along and went on a 74-game winning streak [[GoneHorriblyRight that lasted into the next season]].

to:

* Michael Larson, a contestant on the game show ''Series/PressYourLuck''. He ''memorized'' the patterns that the board revolves around ahead of time, and became the biggest winner in the show's history by a huge margin ($110,237 in cash and prizes). Immediately after this, the patterns were changed to prevent another such incident, and CBS refused to allow anyone to air the episodes (yes, his taping game actually took so long to tape that they had to edit it into a two-parter) on TV for nearly 20 years. To put this into perspective, that was the most anyone had won on U.S. TV in a single game until ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' debuted in 1999.
* Until 2003, ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' champions could win up to five games before being retired.retired, although five-time champs also got a car. Starting in the 2003-04 season, the producers instituted a "sky's the limit" rule where champions could go on and on winning until being defeated. Towards the season's end, Ken Jennings came along and went on a 74-game winning streak [[GoneHorriblyRight that lasted into the next season]].



** '''Dice Game''': Averted early in the game's history, when despite the fact that a die has no numbers higher than six on it there ''could'' be numbers in the car's price higher than six. Went away once the game settled into its normal rules.

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** '''Dice Game''': Averted early in the game's history, when despite the fact that a die only has no the numbers higher than six 1-6 on it - there ''could'' be numbers in the car's price higher than six. that couldn't be rolled. Went away once the game settled into its normal rules.rules sometime in the first half of 1977.



** '''Hole in One or Two''': An unintentional dent in the course once caused a contestant to ''[[GoneHorriblyRight win!]]'' See [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thMUpLqcM2g here:]]
** '''Lucky Seven''': Zeros are never in the price of the car. [[NintendoHard Not exactly a game breaker though]].

to:

** '''Hole in One or Two''': An unintentional dent in the course once caused a contestant to ''[[GoneHorriblyRight win!]]'' See [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thMUpLqcM2g here:]]
here.]]
** '''Lucky Seven''': Zeros are never in the price of the car. [[NintendoHard Not exactly a game breaker though]].breaker, though.]]



** '''Pay the Rent''': The least-expensive item of the six grocery items ''never'' goes on the lowest platform (i.e., "in the mailbox").

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** '''Pay the Rent''': The least-expensive item of the six grocery items almost ''never'' goes on the lowest platform (i.e., "in the mailbox").



** '''Safe Crackers''': The lock tumblers always include a "0," and that zero is intended as the last number, essentially giving the contestant an either-or pick (e.g., $570 or $750?).

to:

** '''Safe Crackers''': The lock tumblers always include a "0," "0", and that zero is intended as the last number, essentially giving the contestant an either-or pick (e.g., $570 or $750?).



** '''10 Chances''': The prices always end in 0, or 5 if there is no 0 pick from.
** '''That's Too Much!''': The correct answer is neither the first- nor 10th-given price. [[note]]For a short time during the 2008-2009 season, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Roger Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8; the production staff let up when fans complained.[[/note]]

to:

** '''10 Chances''': The prices always end in 0, or 5 if there is no 0 to pick from.
** '''That's Too Much!''': The correct answer is neither the first- nor 10th-given price. [[note]]For [[note]](For a short time during the 2008-2009 2008-09 season, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Roger Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8; the production staff let up when fans complained.[[/note]])[[/note]]



*** The Free Play itself has become a major game-breaker. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBAX_M6t-6o One guy landed on the space 5 times in a row]] [[LoopholeAbuse and used it to steal all 5 vowels]], and even besides that, when a player lands on it, [[ComplacentGamingSyndrome they will always immediately jump on the vowels]] without any regard for the possibility of an extra $500 for a consonant.

to:

*** The Free Play itself has become a major game-breaker. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBAX_M6t-6o One guy landed on the space 5 times in a row]] [[LoopholeAbuse and used it to steal all 5 vowels]], and even besides that, when a player lands on it, [[ComplacentGamingSyndrome they will always immediately jump on the vowels]] without any regard for the possibility of an extra $500 for a consonant.consonant...probably because "use Free Play for vowels" is hammered into them by the show's contestant coordinators.



* For the final round of ''Series/MatchGame'', contestants chose one panelist to work with. Richard Dawson was so good at matching that nearly everyone picked him, so the fed-up producers added the Star Wheel in June 1978.

to:

* For the final round Head-To-Head Match portion of ''Series/MatchGame'', contestants chose one panelist to work with. Richard Dawson was so good at matching that nearly everyone picked him, so the fed-up producers added the Star Wheel in June 1978.
14th Feb '16 3:55:47 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** '''Hole in One or Two''': An unintentional dent in the course once caused a contestant to ''[[GoneHorriblyRight win!]]'' See [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thMUpLqcM2g here:]] [[note]]...Could it be that WesternAnimation/BugsBunny [[EpilepticTrees held a magnet under the golf ball course and drug the ball to the hole]], a la ''Film/SpaceJam?''[[/note]]

to:

** '''Hole in One or Two''': An unintentional dent in the course once caused a contestant to ''[[GoneHorriblyRight win!]]'' See [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thMUpLqcM2g here:]] [[note]]...Could it be that WesternAnimation/BugsBunny [[EpilepticTrees held a magnet under the golf ball course and drug the ball to the hole]], a la ''Film/SpaceJam?''[[/note]]
28th Jan '16 3:06:35 AM Gimere
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** "Bonus Category", which immediately allowed the contestant another turn if s/he answered a three-part question correctly. The thing was the category board shuffled, and invariably the "Bonus Category" would appear in an adjacent box or in a space that allowed him/her to set up and/or complete a tic-tac-toe. There were several instances where, when this category appeared, the opponent never got to play the game (although they were always invited back to play the next game). Eventually, in the interest of fair play, the category was retired.
** "Double-or-Nothing", a modified "ExtraTurn" category which added an element of risk take the box or select another box and lose them both on an incorrect answer. The category board didn't shuffle with this category, allowing the opposing player a chance to play.
* ''Series/TheJokersWild'': Spinning three Jokers on a single spin automatically won the game for that contestant, provided s/he correctly answered a question. More than once, this happened on the first spin, but only once the first time it happened, in early 1973 did it result in the opponent not getting a chance to play; the second and all subsequent times it occurred, the opponent was always given at least one opportunity to "catch up" (by continuing to answer questions until they either caught up, won by surpassing the opponent's score or answering incorrectly).
** Additionally, like ''Tic-Tac-Dough'', the 1978-86 syndicated version had a number of special scoring categories which contestants could use to either win immediately, catch up or, in the very least, build a huge advantage and pressure their opponent. Most notable were:

to:

** "Bonus Category", which immediately allowed the contestant another turn if s/he answered a three-part question correctly. The thing was the category board shuffled, and invariably the "Bonus Category" would appear in an adjacent box or in a space [[GoldenSnitch that allowed him/her the contestant to set up and/or complete a tic-tac-toe.tic-tac-toe]]. There were several instances where, when this category appeared, the opponent never got to play the game (although they were always invited back to play the next game). Eventually, in the interest of fair play, the category was retired.
** "Double-or-Nothing", a modified "ExtraTurn" an ExtraTurn category which that added an element of risk take the box or select another box and lose them both on an incorrect answer. The category board didn't shuffle with this category, allowing the opposing player a chance to play.
* ''Series/TheJokersWild'': ''Series/TheJokersWild'':
**
Spinning three Jokers on a single spin automatically won the game for that contestant, provided s/he (s)he correctly answered a question. More than once, this happened on the first spin, but only once the first time it happened, in early 1973 did it result in the opponent not getting a chance to play; the second and all subsequent times it occurred, the opponent was always given at least one opportunity to "catch up" (by continuing to answer questions until they either caught up, won by surpassing the opponent's score or answering incorrectly).
** Additionally, like its sister show ''Tic-Tac-Dough'', the 1978-86 syndicated version had a number of special scoring categories which contestants could use to either win immediately, catch up or, in the very least, build a huge advantage and pressure their opponent. Most notable were:



* ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'': Had a form of this with the Money Cards on the Fame Game board. Choosing the $25 card late in the game often put the game away for the leading contestant, even with the introduction of the 60-second SpeedRound.
* Michael Larson, a contestant on the game show ''Series/PressYourLuck''. He ''memorized'' the patterns that the board revolves around ahead of time, and became the biggest winner in the show's history by a huge margin ($110,237 in cash and prizes). Immediately after this, the patterns were changed to prevent another such incident, and CBS refused to allow anyone to air the episodes (yes, his taping actually took so long they had to edit it into a two-parter) on TV for nearly 20 years.
** To put it into perspective, this was the most anyone had won on U.S. TV in a single game until ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' debuted.

to:

* ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'': Had ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'' had a form of this with the Money Cards on the Fame Game board. Choosing the $25 card late in the game often put the game away for the leading contestant, even with the introduction of the 60-second SpeedRound.
* Michael Larson, a contestant on the game show ''Series/PressYourLuck''. He ''memorized'' the patterns that the board revolves around ahead of time, and became the biggest winner in the show's history by a huge margin ($110,237 in cash and prizes). Immediately after this, the patterns were changed to prevent another such incident, and CBS refused to allow anyone to air the episodes (yes, his taping actually took so long they had to edit it into a two-parter) on TV for nearly 20 years.
**
years. To put it this into perspective, this that was the most anyone had won on U.S. TV in a single game until ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' debuted.debuted in 1999.



** '''Clock Game''': The game often uses multiples of 100 or figures ending in 99. Many contestants have gone right to an $x99 price and gotten it right on the first guess.

to:

** '''Clock Game''': The game often uses multiples of 100 or [[AndNinetyNineCents figures ending in 99.99]]. Many contestants have gone right to an $x99 price and gotten it right on the first guess.



** '''Hole in One or Two''': An unintentional dent in the course once caused a contestant to ''[[GoneHorriblyRight win!]]'' See [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thMUpLqcM2g here:]]
*** ...Could it be that WesternAnimation/BugsBunny [[EpilepticTrees held a magnet under the golf ball course and drug the ball to the hole]], a la ''Film/SpaceJam?''

to:

** '''Hole in One or Two''': An unintentional dent in the course once caused a contestant to ''[[GoneHorriblyRight win!]]'' See [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thMUpLqcM2g here:]]
*** ...
here:]] [[note]]...Could it be that WesternAnimation/BugsBunny [[EpilepticTrees held a magnet under the golf ball course and drug the ball to the hole]], a la ''Film/SpaceJam?'' ''Film/SpaceJam?''[[/note]]
28th Jul '15 12:55:37 AM Gimere
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* ''TheJokersWild'': Spinning three Jokers on a single spin automatically won the game for that contestant, provided s/he correctly answered a question. More than once, this happened on the first spin, but only once the first time it happened, in early 1973 did it result in the opponent not getting a chance to play; the second and all subsequent times it occurred, the opponent was always given at least one opportunity to "catch up" (by continuing to answer questions until they either caught up, won by surpassing the opponent's score or answering incorrectly).

to:

* ''TheJokersWild'': ''Series/TheJokersWild'': Spinning three Jokers on a single spin automatically won the game for that contestant, provided s/he correctly answered a question. More than once, this happened on the first spin, but only once the first time it happened, in early 1973 did it result in the opponent not getting a chance to play; the second and all subsequent times it occurred, the opponent was always given at least one opportunity to "catch up" (by continuing to answer questions until they either caught up, won by surpassing the opponent's score or answering incorrectly).



* Michael Larson, a contestant on the game show ''PressYourLuck''. He ''memorized'' the patterns that the board revolves around ahead of time, and became the biggest winner in the show's history by a huge margin ($110,237 in cash and prizes). Immediately after this, the patterns were changed to prevent another such incident, and CBS refused to allow anyone to air the episodes (yes, his taping actually took so long they had to edit it into a two-parter) on TV for nearly 20 years.
** To put it into perspective, this was the most anyone had won on U.S. TV in a single game until ''WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' debuted.

to:

* Michael Larson, a contestant on the game show ''PressYourLuck''.''Series/PressYourLuck''. He ''memorized'' the patterns that the board revolves around ahead of time, and became the biggest winner in the show's history by a huge margin ($110,237 in cash and prizes). Immediately after this, the patterns were changed to prevent another such incident, and CBS refused to allow anyone to air the episodes (yes, his taping actually took so long they had to edit it into a two-parter) on TV for nearly 20 years.
** To put it into perspective, this was the most anyone had won on U.S. TV in a single game until ''WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' debuted.



* ''ThePriceIsRight'': Many pricing games have unwritten tricks or rules that can be easily broken. Note that several of these games didn't actually have these unstated rules until about the very end of the 1970s or very early 1980s, and are never stated outright, but faithful viewers of the show have picked up on these recurring quirks. Examples:

to:

* ''ThePriceIsRight'': ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'': Many pricing games have unwritten tricks or rules that can be easily broken. Note that several of these games didn't actually have these unstated rules until about the very end of the 1970s or very early 1980s, and are never stated outright, but faithful viewers of the show have picked up on these recurring quirks. Examples:



** '''That's Too Much!''': The correct answer is neither the first- nor 10th-given price. [[note]]For a short time during the 2008-2009 season, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Robert Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8; the production staff let up when fans complained.[[/note]]

to:

** '''That's Too Much!''': The correct answer is neither the first- nor 10th-given price. [[note]]For a short time during the 2008-2009 season, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Robert Roger Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8; the production staff let up when fans complained.[[/note]]
8th May '15 11:06:39 AM hydrix
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* Any Flemish (and perhaps every single one, since the Flemish ones were organized by Endemol) phone-in game show ever that relied on counting. Due to the fact that the answers rely all on the exact same calculation pattern (which always involved an addition) that could always be identified with a counting key. With only the calculation process units being different each time (with obscure Chinese units for instance being a real thing there) one only has to see a certain number of answers (which were always given at the end of the show) in order to have access to a code that solves every single answer for you. With only one out of six answers being wrong due to calculation errors by the very company that makes those shows one only has to know what the counting key looks like in order to win literally five out of six Flemish phone-in game shows involving counting until the company catches up on the facts and makes a new one. Due to how long it takes for those companies to realize that one only needs to participate in every single phone-in game show ever solving every single puzzle with the counting key in your hand and finish when the counting key changes with 1 million euro's in your pocket. Flemish investigative journalism series ''Basta'' noted that when they aired the episode ''De mol in het belspel'' and [[http://www.een.be/files/extra/programmas/basta/basta_110117_telsleutel.pdf published the counting key that was used in Flanders from 2009 until the death of the phone-in game show in Flanders]], but be warned since you need to understand Dutch in order to read it. They ended up with proving that the theory that was true by participating in a counting game show and winning the big prize after 2 guesses.

to:

* Any Flemish (and perhaps every single one, since the Flemish ones were organized by Endemol) phone-in game show ever that relied on counting. Due to the fact that the answers rely all on the exact same calculation pattern (which always involved an addition) that could always be identified with a counting key. With only the calculation process units being different each time (with obscure Chinese units for instance being a real thing there) one only has to see a certain number of answers (which were always given at the end of the show) in order to have access to a code that solves every single answer for you.shows you how to solve a calculation question that is asked to you in a phone-in game show. With only one out of six answers being wrong due to calculation errors by the very company that makes those shows one only has to know what the counting key looks like in order to win literally five out of six Flemish phone-in game shows involving counting until the company catches up on the facts and makes a new one. Due to how long it takes for those companies to realize that one only needs to participate in every single phone-in game show ever solving every single puzzle with the counting key in your hand and finish when the counting key changes with 1 million euro's in your pocket. Flemish investigative journalism series ''Basta'' noted that when they aired the episode ''De mol in het belspel'' and [[http://www.een.be/files/extra/programmas/basta/basta_110117_telsleutel.pdf published the counting key that was used in Flanders from 2009 until the death of the phone-in game show in Flanders]], but be warned since you need to understand Dutch in order to read it. They ended up with proving that the theory that was true by participating in a counting game show and winning the big prize after 2 guesses.guesses, which contributed to the spreading of the above counting key.
8th May '15 11:04:00 AM hydrix
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* Any Flemish (and perhaps every single one, since the Flemish ones were organized by Endemol) phone-in game show ever that relied on counting. Due to the fact that the answers rely all on the exact same calculation pattern (Remember that the thing is always an addition. Counting "!" as a factorial may be optional.) with only the units being different (with obscure Chinese units being a real thing) one only has to see a certain number of answers (which were always given at the end of the show) in order to have access to a code that solves every single answer for you.

to:

* Any Flemish (and perhaps every single one, since the Flemish ones were organized by Endemol) phone-in game show ever that relied on counting. Due to the fact that the answers rely all on the exact same calculation pattern (Remember that the thing is (which always involved an addition. Counting "!" as a factorial may addition) that could always be optional.) identified with a counting key. With only the calculation process units being different each time (with obscure Chinese units for instance being a real thing) thing there) one only has to see a certain number of answers (which were always given at the end of the show) in order to have access to a code that solves every single answer for you.you. With only one out of six answers being wrong due to calculation errors by the very company that makes those shows one only has to know what the counting key looks like in order to win literally five out of six Flemish phone-in game shows involving counting until the company catches up on the facts and makes a new one. Due to how long it takes for those companies to realize that one only needs to participate in every single phone-in game show ever solving every single puzzle with the counting key in your hand and finish when the counting key changes with 1 million euro's in your pocket. Flemish investigative journalism series ''Basta'' noted that when they aired the episode ''De mol in het belspel'' and [[http://www.een.be/files/extra/programmas/basta/basta_110117_telsleutel.pdf published the counting key that was used in Flanders from 2009 until the death of the phone-in game show in Flanders]], but be warned since you need to understand Dutch in order to read it. They ended up with proving that the theory that was true by participating in a counting game show and winning the big prize after 2 guesses.
8th May '15 10:30:30 AM hydrix
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Added DiffLines:

* Any Flemish (and perhaps every single one, since the Flemish ones were organized by Endemol) phone-in game show ever that relied on counting. Due to the fact that the answers rely all on the exact same calculation pattern (Remember that the thing is always an addition. Counting "!" as a factorial may be optional.) with only the units being different (with obscure Chinese units being a real thing) one only has to see a certain number of answers (which were always given at the end of the show) in order to have access to a code that solves every single answer for you.
30th Apr '15 7:10:07 PM nombretomado
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*** ...Could it be that BugsBunny [[EpilepticTrees held a magnet under the golf ball course and drug the ball to the hole]], a la ''Film/SpaceJam?''

to:

*** ...Could it be that BugsBunny WesternAnimation/BugsBunny [[EpilepticTrees held a magnet under the golf ball course and drug the ball to the hole]], a la ''Film/SpaceJam?''
4th Jan '15 11:40:02 AM Twentington
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Added DiffLines:

** The ½ Car tags can be this; unlike other "extras", they are replenished in Rounds 1-3 if one of the two is won (but not if both are). This means that a contestant can pick up the tags in two different rounds and, so long as he or she solves both puzzles without losing either tag to Bankrupt, still win the car. While it's always a lower-end car, that's still a $15,000 hike in score and usually a guaranteed victory.
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