History Fridge / PrideAndPrejudice

3rd Aug '17 6:57:28 PM sagar
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** Plus, Pemberley is where Lizzy meets [[MoralityPet Georgiana]]. Knowing the full story about what Wickham did to Georgiana, plus seeing Darcy's obvious adoration of her, definitely had a hand in turning Lizzy's opinion around, too.

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** Plus, Pemberley is where Lizzy meets [[MoralityPet Georgiana]]. Knowing the full story about what Wickham did to Georgiana, plus seeing Darcy's obvious adoration of her, definitely had a hand in turning Lizzy's opinion around, too.too.
* Mr. Bennett has the reputation for being the reasonable one in his marriage, but beyond his neglect of his daughters and his attitude towards his wife being publically disrespected by them and others, there is a moment at the end of the book that shows he's actually kind of spineless on top of it. When Darcy asks him for permission to marry Elizabeth, Mr. Bennett--who regards Darcy as solely the proud, arrogant, bad-tempered rich guy who snubbed his daughter and is detested by her--gives it automatically. And tells Elizabeth that he wouldn't ''dare'' have done anything else.
12th Jul '17 6:48:14 AM AdelePotter
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** Not to mention, Pemberley shows how Darcy is not his aunt. Everything is done with better taste there than at Rosings, and without making an excessive point about it. Lady Catherine practically makes it her business to be a RichBitch just because she can; Darcy spends some time there but figures out he was pushing TookALevelInJerkass territory while he could still backtrack. (He more or less admits this to Lizzy at the end.)

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** Not to mention, Pemberley shows how Darcy is not his aunt. Everything is done with better taste there than at Rosings, and without making an excessive point about it. Lady Catherine practically makes it her business to be a RichBitch just because she can; Darcy spends some time there but figures out he was pushing TookALevelInJerkass territory while he could still backtrack. (He more or less admits this to Lizzy at the end.))
** Plus, Pemberley is where Lizzy meets [[MoralityPet Georgiana]]. Knowing the full story about what Wickham did to Georgiana, plus seeing Darcy's obvious adoration of her, definitely had a hand in turning Lizzy's opinion around, too.
4th Jun '17 12:51:58 AM loracarol
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** Also, this troper would like to point out that Darcy never traded in his personality for a completely different one. Such was the brilliance of Jane Austen, that the changes to his personality were simply Elizabeth seeing a different side of him; being around pleasant and elegant company and away from the less well behaved people at the dances (her aunt and uncle when compared to her family are practically nobles in their behavior), him being wrong and caught on it for the first time in the novel (there was no way he could deny that Jane was wrong about her sister loving Bingley so he had to admit his wrongdoing), and him being more comfortable on his home turf than in some stranger's house with no one he knows. This troper's 'aha' moment involved this and the relation to the title, how prejudice often blinds us to a person's good traits, and how we are so sure we are right that our entire view of a person changes when proof comes up showing us what a idiot we are. Note that also, the Darcy archetype at the time was NOT a sexy staple like in today's romance, but the least desirable man to chase after. Thus, prejudice also addresses the natural bias women had at that time against the stuffy, socially awkward type... who ends up being actually pretty awesome once you get to know him.

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** Also, this troper would like to point out that Darcy never traded in his personality for a completely different one. Such was the brilliance of Jane Austen, that the changes to his personality were simply Elizabeth seeing a different side of him; being around pleasant and elegant company and away from the less well behaved people at the dances (her aunt and uncle when compared to her family are practically nobles in their behavior), him being wrong and caught on it for the first time in the novel (there was no way he could deny that Jane Elizabeth was wrong about her sister Jane loving Bingley so he had to admit his wrongdoing), and him being more comfortable on his home turf than in some stranger's house with no one he knows. This troper's 'aha' moment involved this and the relation to the title, how prejudice often blinds us to a person's good traits, and how we are so sure we are right that our entire view of a person changes when proof comes up showing us what a idiot we are. Note that also, the Darcy archetype at the time was NOT a sexy staple like in today's romance, but the least desirable man to chase after. Thus, prejudice also addresses the natural bias women had at that time against the stuffy, socially awkward type... who ends up being actually pretty awesome once you get to know him.
31st Oct '16 9:52:16 PM theloopweaver
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Added DiffLines:

*** I'm pretty sure the text says outright that ''both'' Jane and Lizzy are particularly close to Mrs. Gardiner. In any event, it wasn't described as being particularly strange that the Gardiners just randomly took Jane to London after their Christmas visit.
15th Jan '16 8:41:57 PM theloopweaver
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* I for a long while opted to consider Lizzie's remark about realizing she loves Mr. Darcy when she saw his estate as a joke intended to dodge the question, but actually, it had some truth in it. What she saw there and what impressed him was not the financial value of the place, but its ''state'': it was well-kept, well-organized, with the servants happy and gushing about their master. Servants who have known both Darcy and Wickam way longer than Lizzie has. While not a LoveEpiphany, this ''was'' the point she realized she gave credit to the wrong person and should have believed and trusted Darcy instead!

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* I for a long while opted to consider Lizzie's remark about realizing she loves Mr. Darcy when she saw his estate as a joke intended to dodge the question, but actually, it had some truth in it. What she saw there and what impressed him was not the financial value of the place, but its ''state'': it was well-kept, well-organized, with the servants happy and gushing about their master. Servants who have known both Darcy and Wickam way longer than Lizzie has. While not a LoveEpiphany, this ''was'' the point she realized she gave credit to the wrong person and should have believed and trusted Darcy instead!instead!
** Not to mention, Pemberley shows how Darcy is not his aunt. Everything is done with better taste there than at Rosings, and without making an excessive point about it. Lady Catherine practically makes it her business to be a RichBitch just because she can; Darcy spends some time there but figures out he was pushing TookALevelInJerkass territory while he could still backtrack. (He more or less admits this to Lizzy at the end.)
10th Jan '16 7:09:10 PM lihtox
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Added DiffLines:

** And while one can make fun at her obsession with marrying off her daughters, that is her JOB. She's pretty good at it too: when Mr. Bennet reads the letter from Mr. Collins she immediately realizes that he plans to marry one of her daughters, while the others only figure it out later. Worse still, Mrs. Bennet might blame herself for only having had daughters, or for not being able to bear a sixth child. Her desperation and nervousness in the book may be due to a sense of overwhelming guilt or shame. I have come to have a lot of sympathy for Mrs. Bennet, and am glad that she gets her happy ending too.
3rd Dec '15 3:31:35 AM seldarius
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Added DiffLines:

**If you consider Lydia's situation there is plenty of reason to feel sorry for the girl. She is 16 when she runs away with Wickham, obviously not particularly clever (she is described as a silly girl with not much in her head other than partying, men and fashion) and both her parents have failed to give her any proper education or understanding. Her father doesn't pay much attention to her, he rather ships her off to Brighton than deal with her getting on his nerves, and her mother spoils her and is obsessed with getting the girls married. So when she throws herself at a handsome young man with charme and a decent position she is pretty much doing exactly what she has been taught to do, while being incapable of grasping the impact of her decision. From today's perspective it is madness that a teenager would be considered so tainted by eloping with her first crush that she will drag her whole family down unless she marries him. And Jane Austen herself, though much more familiar with those social expectations, points out the craziness and inevitability of the situation ("And they must marry! Yet he is such a man!"). So, thanks to Darcy's meddling to save Elisabeth, (not entirely selfless as he admits himself, as his chances to marry her depend on her being "untainted" by her sister's behaviour,) Lydia ends up in a loveless marriage with a bad man and shunned by her own family. Not exactly a happy ending.
23rd Oct '15 9:53:19 PM akanesarumara
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* Part of the problem for the Bennetts is that England is a Protestant country. In Spain or Italy or Austria, a similarly-situated family (gentry/minor nobility with too many daughters), at least one of the girls would have become a nun. Mary, for example, would have done well in a convent--she would have played the organ in the chapel, taught in the girls' school, and generally been very busy and happy.

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* Part of the problem for the Bennetts is that England is a Protestant country. In Spain or Italy or Austria, a similarly-situated family (gentry/minor nobility with too many daughters), at least one of the girls would have become a nun. Mary, for example, would have done well in a convent--she would have played the organ in the chapel, taught in the girls' school, and generally been very busy and happy.happy.
* I for a long while opted to consider Lizzie's remark about realizing she loves Mr. Darcy when she saw his estate as a joke intended to dodge the question, but actually, it had some truth in it. What she saw there and what impressed him was not the financial value of the place, but its ''state'': it was well-kept, well-organized, with the servants happy and gushing about their master. Servants who have known both Darcy and Wickam way longer than Lizzie has. While not a LoveEpiphany, this ''was'' the point she realized she gave credit to the wrong person and should have believed and trusted Darcy instead!
16th Oct '15 2:01:00 AM NozzDogg
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** One fanfiction proposed a very believable theory on the eldest Bennets' quality; the Gardiners used to take them in regularl. They were unable to take the younger sisters as they began to gain their own tribe of children. This also explains the particular closeness of Elizabeth and her aunt; Mrs Gardiner was a surrogate mother figure to her, as Mrs Bennet never truly favoured her.

to:

** One fanfiction proposed a very believable theory on the eldest Bennets' quality; the Gardiners used to take them in regularl.regularly. They were unable to take the younger sisters as they began to gain their own tribe of children. This also explains the particular closeness of Elizabeth and her aunt; Mrs Gardiner was a surrogate mother figure to her, as Mrs Bennet never truly favoured her.
16th Oct '15 2:00:23 AM NozzDogg
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Added DiffLines:

** One fanfiction proposed a very believable theory on the eldest Bennets' quality; the Gardiners used to take them in regularl. They were unable to take the younger sisters as they began to gain their own tribe of children. This also explains the particular closeness of Elizabeth and her aunt; Mrs Gardiner was a surrogate mother figure to her, as Mrs Bennet never truly favoured her.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.PrideAndPrejudice