History Fridge / Mash

8th Nov '17 5:15:06 AM ErikModi
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** Falsifying a death certificate is ''hugely'' illegal, and Hawkeye is the only one who thinks of it when they fail.
7th Oct '17 4:13:13 PM lorgskyegon
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**** It shows that Charles thinks he is so much better that he thinks he couldn't possibly make a simple mistake as that one so he doesn't need to show immense care.
12th Aug '17 9:30:16 AM Vandalia92
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** A reenlistment must be approved by the unit commander. Obviously, Colonel Potter did not give his approval given his behavior later in the episode. So the "contract" was not worth the paper it was written on.
12th Aug '17 9:26:29 AM Vandalia92
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**** It is important to remember this was a different era. While residency training was rapidly becoming the norm, it would not at all have been uncommon to have a large number of non-residency trained physicians - including surgeons - in the community. Residency then was like a sub-specialty fellowship is today. While there are fellowships in things like "laparoscopic surgery" today, if you have your gallbladder taken out today it almost certainly will be done by a general surgeon who has not completed a fellowship in such things.


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** A few things: First, in military medicine there is something known as "MASH Syndrome." This is the belief by line officers and politicians that casualties in a conflict are mostly if not exclusively surgical. In reality, the opposite is true. The only US conflict that had more soldiers lost to surgical rather than medical problems was the invasion of Grenada. In reality, the vast majority of patients cycling through a MASH would have been those needing basic medical care. In addition, the vast majority of patients would have needed very basic care, i.e. "flesh wounds", "fractures" and the like. Burns was not a completely incompetent surgeon, I believe Blake called him a "fair but competent" surgeon (or something like that.)
23rd Jul '17 10:26:10 PM nightkiller
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** According the U.S. Army Center of Military History “…a soldier earned four points for every month he served in close combat, two points per month for rear-echelon duty in Korea, and one point for duty elsewhere in the Far East…The Army initially stated that enlisted men needed to earn forty-three points to be eligible for rotation back to the States, while officers required fifty-five points. In June 1952 the Army reduced these requirements to thirty-six points for enlisted men and thirty-seven points for officers.”

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** According the [[http://www.history.army.mil/brochures/kw-stale/stale.htm U.S. Army Center of Military History History]] “…a soldier earned four points for every month he served in close combat, two points per month for rear-echelon duty in Korea, and one point for duty elsewhere in the Far East…The Army initially stated that enlisted men needed to earn forty-three points to be eligible for rotation back to the States, while officers required fifty-five points. In June 1952 the Army reduced these requirements to thirty-six points for enlisted men and thirty-seven points for officers.”
23rd Jul '17 10:24:50 PM nightkiller
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** According the U.S. Army Center of Military History “…a soldier earned four points for every month he served in close combat, two points per month for rear-echelon duty in Korea, and one point for duty elsewhere in the Far East…The Army initially stated that enlisted men needed to earn forty-three points to be eligible for rotation back to the States, while officers required fifty-five points. In June 1952 the Army reduced these requirements to thirty-six points for enlisted men and thirty-seven points for officers.”
1st Jul '17 9:36:07 PM Lightning4119
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* Throughout the series, a number of shenanigans are necessary because of the characters conveniently forgetting that the VIP tent exists, thus having to bunk elsewhere (see Col. Mulholland in "House Arrest," Tony Baker in "The Nurses," etc.). When you remember that the hospital is frequently shelled from both sides, it's not out of the realm of possibility that the VIP tent gets blown up or used for other purposes every now and then.
2nd Mar '17 9:52:30 PM Lightning4119
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** He wasn't the only one. When Margaret shows Potter a picture of him, he asks who the girl in the picture is.

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** He wasn't the only one. When Margaret shows Potter a picture of him, he asks who the girl in the picture is. Which raises the question of just how careless (or audacious) Donald was that he gave Margaret a picture of him ''with another woman.''



*** Not to mention that we rarely hear about what happens to the casualties once they've left the camp, but there's no reason that the doctors couldn't have gotten word from the 121st Evac that one of their patients didn't make it. Who's to say that several of Frank's patients don't croak at the evac hospital?

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*** Not to mention that we rarely hear about what happens to the casualties once they've left the camp, but there's no reason that the doctors couldn't have gotten word from the 121st Evac that one of their patients didn't make it. Who's to say that several of Frank's patients don't croak at the evac hospital?hospital? In multiple episodes he fails to diagnose simple conditions - hypothermia in one that leads him to write off a patient that was presumably saved, shock in another that nearly lets a patient die to renal failure - cuts corners, and has no investment in his patients. It all tallies up to put Frank squarely in the area of "we need every cutter we can get, no matter ''how'' incompetent he is." The same shortage that got the other surgeons out of so much trouble kept Frank from being reassigned to a morgue detail.
26th Feb '17 1:19:02 PM Lightning4119
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** Because they're going to do their best to do it legitimately, and it seems like Hawkeye only thinks to just falsify the death certificate when the soldier finally dies just before midnight. Besides, if ''you'' had just left a man to die, could you enjoy the party?
10th Oct '16 8:21:58 PM ShorinBJ
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* In "Major Topper", Charles keeps topping whatever stories Hawkeye or BJ tell with better ones, culminating in him claiming to have had a date with Audrey Hepburn. They call bullshit, and he produces a photograph of him with the famous starlet, the implication being that all his stories are true. It's the one before that that gets to me. They run out of morphine, and get the patients through the night with placebos -- Potter's idea. Hawkeye is saying how it was the most amazing thing he'd ever seen, and Charles dismisses that, recounting a story in which he witnessed an operation done without anesthesia, the patient having been put under via hypnosis. Flag on the play; Charles was the one loudly and repeatedly insisting that placebos wouldn't work, that they could possibly work, and then when they do? "Oh, that's nothing, I've seen better." Bullshit. But it actually works for the joke that way. He spins these cock and bull stories, Hawkeye and BJ don't really buy it, but they let it go. Then when they've finally had enough and call him out, that happens to be the one he was telling the truth about, and he has photographic evidence.

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* In "Major Topper", Charles keeps topping whatever stories Hawkeye or BJ tell with better ones, culminating in him claiming to have had a date with Audrey Hepburn. They call bullshit, and he produces a photograph of him with the famous starlet, the implication being that all his stories are true. It's the one before that that gets to me. They run out of morphine, and get the patients through the night with placebos -- Potter's idea. Hawkeye is saying how it was the most amazing thing he'd ever seen, and Charles dismisses that, recounting a story in which he witnessed an operation done without anesthesia, the patient having been put under via hypnosis. Flag on the play; Charles was the one loudly and repeatedly insisting that placebos wouldn't work, that they could couldn't possibly work, and then when they do? "Oh, that's nothing, I've seen better." Bullshit. But it actually works for the joke that way. He spins these cock and bull stories, Hawkeye and BJ don't really buy it, but they let it go. Then when they've finally had enough and call him out, that happens to be the one he was telling the truth about, and he has photographic evidence.
This list shows the last 10 events of 121. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.Mash