History Fridge / BeautyAndTheBeast

20th May '17 4:54:49 AM Zark
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** Come to think about it, some of Gaston's most definitive traits can be said to apply to the Prince in the prologue as well. He is also an arrogant jerkass, who despises anyone below him, yet is adored by the people surrounding him. Gaston's popularity gives him essentially the status of the village's prince, while Adam is an actual prince. Even the way the Prince tries to apologize to the Enchantress, when she reveals her true nature, somewhat mirrors the way Gaston pleads for mercy, when the Beast lifts him over the ledge. If the Prince never got cursed, one could easily imagine him growing into someone not unlike Gaston.
16th May '17 5:38:26 PM gothelittle
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** Well, to be utterly fair (but probably no less horrifying), he wasn't at all interested in locking up Maurice until it was part of a plan for Gaston to get Belle to marry him. Before that, even as Gaston described her father's various foibles, Monsieur D'arque simply muttered, "Maurice is harmless."
9th May '17 8:56:29 AM rememberthehood1941
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* For all of the vitriol hurled at the Enchantress for cursing an eleven year old boy for not letting her into the house, the Prologue makes a couple of things clear. One, the story starts proper on "one winter's night" with the old beggar woman asking "for shelter from the bitter cold". And two, the stained glass windows has lighting present, implying that there was a storm going on. What if the old beggar woman hadn't been an Enchantress? That's right, she would've been ''frozen to death during a winter storm''. Yeah...even an 11 year old can see this.

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* For all of the vitriol hurled at the Enchantress for cursing an eleven year old boy for not letting her into the house, castle, the Prologue and the rest of the story makes a couple of few things clear. One, the story starts proper on "one winter's night" with the old beggar woman asking "for shelter from the bitter cold". And two, Two, the stained glass windows has lighting present, implying that there was a storm going on. And three, the castle is deep into the forest, as evidenced by Maurice searching for at least several months for the castle and it's implied that Gaston asked the Mirror the direction to the castle. What if the old beggar woman hadn't been an Enchantress? That's right, she would've been ''frozen to death during a winter storm''. Yeah...even an 11 year old can see this.
9th May '17 8:54:02 AM rememberthehood1941
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* For all of the vitriol hurled at the Enchantress for cursing an eleven year old boy for not letting her into the house, the Prologue makes a couple of things clear. One, the story starts proper on "one winter's night" with the old beggar woman asking "for shelter from the bitter cold". And two, the stained glass windows has lighting present, implying that there was a storm going on. What if the old beggar woman hadn't been an Enchantress? That's right, she would've been ''frozen to death during a winter storm''. Yeah...even an 11 year old can see this.
27th Apr '17 1:19:30 AM CthonisPrincess
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** WordOfGod: [[http://www.pages.drexel.edu/~ina22/splaylib/Screenplay-Beauty_and_the_Beast.pdf The original screenplay of the movie written by Linda Woolverton]], the prologue directly mentions that the Prince was 11 years of age when he was cursed. The screenplay mentions that the Prince was the reigning monarch of the kingdom he lived in and that Lumière and Cogsworth (Not yet named) were his regents. As for the West Wing Portrait of him, portraits of King Edward Tudor (Edward VI) depict him as looking 18 years of age, when in reality, he was 13 years of age when it was painted, this was the case of children who were the reigning monarchs of their country.



** The Beast's young appearance/build in ''Enchanted Christmas'' is exactly the same as my brother's when he was ten years old, he could've simply been tall for his age which isn't uncommon. As for the portrait, it's possible that the Enchantress placed a spell on it to depict what he would look like had he still been human. Besides portraits of King Edward Tudor (Edward VI) depict him as looking 18 years of age, when in reality, he was 13 years of age when it was painted.

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** The Beast's young appearance/build in ''Enchanted Christmas'' is exactly the same as my brother's when he was ten years old, he could've simply been tall for his age which isn't uncommon. As for the portrait, it's possible that the Enchantress placed a spell on it to depict what he would look like had he still been human. Besides portraits of King Edward Tudor (Edward VI) depict him as looking 18 years of age, when in reality, he was 13 years of age when it was painted.
23rd Apr '17 2:10:34 AM Nakuyabi
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** Perhaps the guy was actually a closet crossdresser and that just presented him a "plausible" opportunity to indulge his fetish?
23rd Apr '17 1:57:50 AM Nakuyabi
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** If you truly think about it, only the servants and the servants children failed to age, not the poor Beast. The servants were all non-living objects that age in name only, not in look. Beast, as the only one cursed into another organic body could age. It makes perfect sense to this troper. Combine that with the fact the Beast has trouble reading. Even nobles back then had limited reading ability at the age of 11, and that's even if they get taught. Well, besides Belle, who's going to sit with the beast and teach him to read? Most of the servants doubtfully know how to read, and the Beast was too impatient before Belle to learn from the ones that did.
** All the evidence in the movie points to one thing: he was clearly a child when he was cursed. Even when I was a kid and I saw this movie for the first time, I was struck by the Beast's lack of manners or even basic knowledge of table edicate. Sure, he'd been a beast most of his life, but he should at least know how people eat at the table from the memories he's had as a human. Especially a prince of all people! But if the prince had been ten or eleven years old when he first got cursed, then it all makes sense. The beast doesn't know how to eat like a human because he was too young to remember it before he was transformed. Even the way acts around Belle shows that the last time he was around people was when he was a child, he mentions he's never felt this way before and has to ask Cogsworth and Lumière (Adult men who have experience with women, mind you) for help when he wanted to give Belle a gift and the way he presented the library to Belle is shown in a rather 'childish' way. He tells her to close her eyes because its a surprise and he clearly has childlike excitement about it. Belle had to teach him everything about human interaction. He is clearly thrilled when birds start feeding from his hands, he is definitely nervous when Belle places his hands on her body to lead him into a dance, also he can't dance (Those first few verses of 'Beauty and the Beast' has him constantly glancing at his feet) and just look at the look he gives Cogsworth and Lumière when Belle rests her head on his chest and the absolute delight he has when Cogsworth, Lumière and Mrs Potts turn back into humans. In fact just about EVERY interaction with Belle after he saves her from the wolves has the reminiscent of a child expirencing their first crush (And in this instance, their only crush). That's why it is such a big deal when he admits to Cogsworth that he's in love with Belle, the movie's not just about a beast turning back into a Prince, it's also about a boy growing into a man.

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** If you truly think about it, only the servants and the servants children failed to age, not the poor Beast. The servants were all non-living objects that age in name only, not in look. Beast, as the only one cursed into another organic body could age. It makes perfect sense to this troper. Combine that with the fact how the Beast has trouble reading. is shown (in the extended version) to be only at the "decoding" stage of literacy (pronouncing the "w" in "two" as he's trying to read ''Romeo and Juliet'' back to Belle). Even nobles back then had limited reading ability at the age of 11, and that's even if they get taught. even got reading lessons. Well, besides Belle, who's going to sit with the beast and teach him to read? Most of the servants doubtfully know how to read, and the Beast was too impatient before Belle to learn from the ones that did.
** All the evidence in the movie points to one thing: he was clearly a child when he was cursed. Even when I was a kid and I saw this movie for the first time, I was struck by the Beast's lack of manners or even basic knowledge of table edicate. etiquette. Sure, he'd been a beast most of his life, but he should at least know how people eat at the table from the memories he's had as a human. Especially human; especially a prince prince, of all people! But if the prince had been ten or eleven years old when he first got cursed, then it all makes sense. The beast doesn't know how to eat like a human because he was too young to remember how he did it before he was transformed. Even the way acts around Belle shows that the last time he was around people was when he was a child, he mentions he's never felt this way before and has to ask Cogsworth and Lumière (Adult men who have experience with women, mind you) for help when he wanted wants to give Belle a gift gift; and the way he presented presents the library to Belle is shown in a rather 'childish' way. He tells her to close her eyes because its a surprise and he clearly has childlike excitement about it. Belle had to teach him everything about human interaction. He is clearly thrilled when birds start feeding from his hands, he is definitely nervous when Belle places his hands on her body to lead him into a dance, also he can't dance (Those very well (the first few verses of 'Beauty and the Beast' has have him constantly glancing at his feet) and just look at the look he gives Cogsworth and Lumière when Belle rests her head on his chest and the absolute delight he has when Cogsworth, Lumière and Mrs Potts turn back into humans. In fact just about EVERY interaction with Belle after he saves her from the wolves has the reminiscent of a child expirencing their boy experiencing his first crush (And in this instance, their his only crush). That's why it is such a big deal when he admits to Cogsworth that he's in love with Belle, the movie's not just about a beast turning back into a Prince, it's also about a boy growing into a man.



** It's not that the Beast's human form is "ugly", but like WordOfGod stated, "it's the Beast people fall in love with", hence they figured no matter how handsome they made his human form, people would still be disappointed. Some of the animators even made a joke when directing the scene where Belle sees his human form for the first time, discussing if they should have her touch his face and ask "Can you grow a beard?"
*** This shows up as early as the original fairy tale, in fact. Since Belle (and, by extension, the reader) only gets to know Beast, losing the big furry nice guy and being handed some nobleman in a suit is... well, jarring, to say the least. In fact, Belle had to look into his vivid blue eyes to make her recognize that it was him all along. All the way back to the original, the Prince has to hurriedly explain who he was moments ago.
** And this sounds like heavy YMMV as plenty of people find the Prince to be stunning. It probably has more to do with his design being more ''bland'' than it was as the Beast, not "ugly."

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** It's not that the Beast's human form is "ugly", but like WordOfGod stated, "it's "It's the Beast people fall in love with", hence with." Hence, they figured no matter how handsome they made his human form, people would still be disappointed. Some of the animators even made a joke when directing the scene where Belle sees his human form for the first time, discussing if they should have her touch his face and ask "Can you grow a beard?"
*** This shows up as early as the original fairy tale, in fact. Since Belle (and, by extension, the reader) only gets to know Beast, losing the big furry nice guy and being handed some nobleman in a suit is... well, jarring, to say the least. In fact, Belle had has to look into his vivid blue eyes to make her recognize that it this is who he was him all along. All the way back to the original, the Prince has to hurriedly explain do some fast talking to get her to realize who he was a few moments ago.
** And this sounds like heavy YMMV as plenty of people find the Prince to be stunning. It probably has more to do with his design being more ''bland'' ''just another pretty face'' than it was his distinctive look as the Beast, not "ugly." ugly.



* This is somewhat stated above, but think about all the servants that were turned into objects. Now obviously you have Mrs. Potts who is the head of the kitchen, but think about that for a second. While she is a tea pot, it isn't like she herself could cook a meal or bring the plate out without some kind of help. You also have all those plates and spoons that appear in the musical number (Be Our Guest). While some people think they are servants that were turned into objects, that doesn't explain why some objects have faces and some do not. In this case, Mrs. Potts is head of the kitchen, so naturally the curse allows her to control all the things in the kitchen. She can tell a pot to get on the stove or tell a cart to bring food out and they will obey her as she herself wouldn't be able to do those things. The same could be said of Lumiere, who is the castle's Maitre d (the head waiter). So he could also control plates, glasses, and dishes, which explains how he managed to pull off the "Be Our Guest" song. This could also extend to anything having to do with being a waiter, including control over candles and table sheets. Cogsworth is the only one really not able to control much, as he is the Beast's scheduler, meaning that he would only be able to control clocks, explaining why he couldn't really stop the song "Be Our Guest" as those items in the dance weren't under his realm of control.

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* This is somewhat stated above, but think about all the servants that were turned into objects. Now obviously you have Mrs. Potts who is the head of the kitchen, but think about that for a second. While she is a tea pot, it isn't like she herself could cook a meal or bring the plate out without some kind of help. You also have all those plates and spoons that appear in the musical number (Be Our Guest). While some people think they are servants that were turned into objects, that doesn't explain why some objects have faces and some do not. In this case, Mrs. Potts is head of the kitchen, so naturally the curse allows her to control all the things in the kitchen. She can tell a pot to get on the stove or tell a cart to bring food out and they will obey her as she herself wouldn't be able to do those things. The same could be said of Lumiere, who is the castle's Maitre d Maitre'd (the head waiter). So he could also control plates, glasses, and dishes, which explains how he managed to pull off the "Be Our Guest" song. This could also extend to anything having to do with being a waiter, including control over candles and table sheets. Cogsworth is the only one really not able to control much, as he is the Beast's scheduler, meaning that he would only be able to control clocks, explaining why he couldn't really stop the song "Be Our Guest" as those items in the dance weren't under his realm of control.control.
** In fact, the moving objects without faces seem to be more ''extensions'' of the characters than anything else, as they don't mind expending some of them out of necessity. Take a look at the battle between the palace staff and Gaston's mob of angry villagers, and you'll see the plates throwing themselves at the villagers and ''breaking themselves over their targets' heads''. It seems unlikely they'd go sacrificing themselves like that if they were living beings, whereas if they're mere extensions, of course the servants throwing those plates aren't going to mourn breaking a few plates any more than any of us might mourn losing a few of our fingernail clippings.
16th Apr '17 7:45:31 PM CthonisPrincess
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** Actually it is my belief that not all the magical servants were human to begin with (and some of them, like the spoons and the dishes) were just enchanted objects...
** For one it would [[FateWorseThanDeath suck to be turned into a spoon]], secondly I doubt the Beast would need that ''many'' servants! Third if all those guys were humans before then, what cutlery was the Beast using ''before'' everyone was cursed?
** Maybe they didn't really eat with utensils, in TheMiddleAges it wasn't uncommon even for nobility to eat with their hands. And his table manners are atrocious- the question is if those table manners deteriorated out of lack of use as a beast, or if they were ALWAYS like that. Adding plates and utensils to the castle was another aspect of making him learn how to act like a human.

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** Actually it is my belief that not all the magical servants were human to begin with (and some of them, like with, the spoons and reason why the dishes) were just enchanted objects...
** For one it would [[FateWorseThanDeath suck to be turned into a spoon]], secondly I doubt the Beast would need that ''many'' servants! Third if all those guys were humans before then, what
cutlery and plates etc could move was because of the Beast using ''before'' everyone was cursed?
** Maybe they didn't really eat with utensils, in TheMiddleAges it wasn't uncommon even for nobility
servants themselves where controlling them, the castle is implied to eat possess telekinetic magic to help the servants with their hands. And his table manners are atrocious- the question is if those table manners deteriorated out of lack of use as a beast, or if they were ALWAYS like that. Adding plates and utensils to the castle was another aspect of making him learn how to act like a human.daily duties.
15th Apr '17 8:30:11 PM CthonisPrincess
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** All the evidence in the movie points to one thing: he was clearly a child when he was cursed. Even when I was a kid and I saw this movie for the first time, I was struck by the Beast's lack of manners or even basic knowledge of table edicate. Sure, he'd been a beast most of his life, but he should at least know how people eat at the table from the memories he's had as a human. Especially a prince of all people! But if the prince had been ten or eleven years old when he first got cursed, then it all makes sense. The beast doesn't know how to eat like a human because he was too young to remember it before he was transformed. Even the way acts around Belle shows that the last time he was around people was when he was a child, he has to ask Cogsworth and Lumière (Adult men who have experience with women, mind you) for help when he wanted to give Belle a gift and the way he presented the library to Belle is shown in a rather 'childish' way. He tells her to close her eyes because its a surprise and he clearly has childlike excitement about it. Belle had to teach him everything about human interaction. The Beast's young appearance/build in ''Enchanted Christmas'' is exactly the same as my brother's when he was ten years old, he could've simply been tall for his age which isn't uncommon. As for the portrait, it's possible that the Enchantress placed a spell on it to depict what he would look like had he still been human. Besides portraits of King Edward Tudor (Edward VI) depict him as looking 18 years of age, when in reality, he was 13 years of age when it was painted.

to:

** All the evidence in the movie points to one thing: he was clearly a child when he was cursed. Even when I was a kid and I saw this movie for the first time, I was struck by the Beast's lack of manners or even basic knowledge of table edicate. Sure, he'd been a beast most of his life, but he should at least know how people eat at the table from the memories he's had as a human. Especially a prince of all people! But if the prince had been ten or eleven years old when he first got cursed, then it all makes sense. The beast doesn't know how to eat like a human because he was too young to remember it before he was transformed. Even the way acts around Belle shows that the last time he was around people was when he was a child, he mentions he's never felt this way before and has to ask Cogsworth and Lumière (Adult men who have experience with women, mind you) for help when he wanted to give Belle a gift and the way he presented the library to Belle is shown in a rather 'childish' way. He tells her to close her eyes because its a surprise and he clearly has childlike excitement about it. Belle had to teach him everything about human interaction. The He is clearly thrilled when birds start feeding from his hands, he is definitely nervous when Belle places his hands on her body to lead him into a dance, also he can't dance (Those first few verses of 'Beauty and the Beast' has him constantly glancing at his feet) and just look at the look he gives Cogsworth and Lumière when Belle rests her head on his chest and the absolute delight he has when Cogsworth, Lumière and Mrs Potts turn back into humans. In fact just about EVERY interaction with Belle after he saves her from the wolves has the reminiscent of a child expirencing their first crush (And in this instance, their only crush). That's why it is such a big deal when he admits to Cogsworth that he's in love with Belle, the movie's not just about a beast turning back into a Prince, it's also about a boy growing into a man.
**The
Beast's young appearance/build in ''Enchanted Christmas'' is exactly the same as my brother's when he was ten years old, he could've simply been tall for his age which isn't uncommon. As for the portrait, it's possible that the Enchantress placed a spell on it to depict what he would look like had he still been human. Besides portraits of King Edward Tudor (Edward VI) depict him as looking 18 years of age, when in reality, he was 13 years of age when it was painted.
15th Apr '17 8:20:07 PM CthonisPrincess
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** All the evidence in the movie points to one thing: he was clearly a child when he was cursed. Even when I was a kid and I saw this movie for the first time, I was struck by the Beast's lack of manners or even basic knowledge of table edicate. Sure, he'd been a beast most of his life, but he should at least know how people eat at the table from the memories he's had as a human. Especially a prince of all people! But if the prince had been ten or eleven years old when he first got cursed, then it all makes sense. The beast doesn't know how to eat like a human because he was too young to remember it before he was transformed. Bell had to teach him everything about human interaction. The Beast's young appearance/build in ''Enchanted Christmas'' is exactly the same as my borther's when he was ten years old, he could've simply been tall for his age which isn't uncommon. As for the portrait, it's possible that the Enchantress placed a spell on it to depict what he would look like had he still been human. Besides portraits of King Edward Tudor (Edward VI) depict him as looking 18 years of age, when in reality, he was 13 years of age when it was painted.

to:

** All the evidence in the movie points to one thing: he was clearly a child when he was cursed. Even when I was a kid and I saw this movie for the first time, I was struck by the Beast's lack of manners or even basic knowledge of table edicate. Sure, he'd been a beast most of his life, but he should at least know how people eat at the table from the memories he's had as a human. Especially a prince of all people! But if the prince had been ten or eleven years old when he first got cursed, then it all makes sense. The beast doesn't know how to eat like a human because he was too young to remember it before he was transformed. Bell Even the way acts around Belle shows that the last time he was around people was when he was a child, he has to ask Cogsworth and Lumière (Adult men who have experience with women, mind you) for help when he wanted to give Belle a gift and the way he presented the library to Belle is shown in a rather 'childish' way. He tells her to close her eyes because its a surprise and he clearly has childlike excitement about it. Belle had to teach him everything about human interaction. The Beast's young appearance/build in ''Enchanted Christmas'' is exactly the same as my borther's brother's when he was ten years old, he could've simply been tall for his age which isn't uncommon. As for the portrait, it's possible that the Enchantress placed a spell on it to depict what he would look like had he still been human. Besides portraits of King Edward Tudor (Edward VI) depict him as looking 18 years of age, when in reality, he was 13 years of age when it was painted.
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