History Fridge / BeautyAndTheBeast

30th Jan '17 10:42:44 AM Overfiend
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** Perhaps the guy was actually a closet crossdresser and that just presented him a "plausible" opportunity to indulge his fetish?
30th Jan '17 10:31:34 AM Overfiend
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* The "''Mob Song''" concerns with the widespread fear of a "beast" that, according to Gaston, will "make off with the children" and it's armed with "massive paws and killer claws for the feast". It may sound odd for those who didn't already know about this, but some kind of man-eating animal ''actually'' ravaged the region of Gévaudan (not far from both Provence and Gascony, where the cartoon could be set in) between 1764 and 1767. As Gaston said, the "beast" had huge paws and "razor-sharp" fangs: the animal (a wolf, possibly) that devastated that region of France had huge paws (50 ft wide) and a remarkable size: 3 ft tall, 4 ft long and weighing almost 150 pounds. The exceptional size was due to a disease called achromegalia, but it would be scary to meet it alone nonetheless. Now imagine those paesants had already heard rumors about this monster, and that this animal used to target weak individuals such as women and young boys. Gaston may have cleverly manipulated the villagers' fear of being attacked by this werewolf-like creature in order to accomplish his plan. Oddly, this was even more justified when everyone saw the Beast's face in Belle's magic mirror, confirming the spreading rumours about the Gévaudan events. That was the moment they panicked and finally took action. Furthermore, that explains why no one in the tavern believed Maurice: no one in the town ever saw the beast in the first place, and his reputation as a mad inventor did all the rest.

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* The "''Mob Song''" concerns with the widespread fear of a "beast" that, according to Gaston, will "make off with the children" and it's armed with "massive paws and killer claws for the feast". It may sound odd for those who didn't already know about this, but some kind of man-eating animal ''actually'' ravaged the region of Gévaudan (not far from both Provence and Gascony, where the cartoon could be set in) between 1764 and 1767. As Gaston said, the "beast" had huge paws and "razor-sharp" fangs: the animal (a wolf, possibly) that devastated that region of France had huge paws (50 ft wide) and a remarkable size: 3 ft tall, 4 ft long and weighing almost 150 pounds. The exceptional size was due to a disease called achromegalia, agromagelia, but it would be scary to meet it alone nonetheless. Now imagine those paesants peasants had already heard rumors about this monster, and that this animal used to target weak individuals such as women and young boys. Gaston may have cleverly manipulated the villagers' fear of being attacked by this werewolf-like creature in order to accomplish his plan. Oddly, this was even more justified when everyone saw the Beast's face in Belle's magic mirror, confirming the spreading rumours rumors about the Gévaudan events. That was the moment they panicked and finally took action. Furthermore, that explains why no one in the tavern believed Maurice: no one in the town ever saw the beast in the first place, and his reputation as a mad inventor did all the rest.


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** Pretty shitty, I'd say, being constantly dumped on like that...
30th Jan '17 9:56:24 AM Overfiend
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** Gaston is a HUNTER. Hunters seek the hard to attain prey, not petting zoo fodder.

1st Jan '17 5:33:18 PM appealus
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* Imagine the outcome for Belle in the forest with the wolfs attacking her if the Beast hadn't come when he did.

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* Imagine the outcome for Belle in the forest with the wolfs wolves attacking her if the Beast hadn't come when he did.
14th Nov '16 1:25:27 PM RebeccaOTool
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***Beast responds "No." to this, in a very 'you're clearly lying.' way, indicating that though he's ready to wait for death to set him free (a line from an earlier musical reprise of his) he's no fool; he knows Belle wouldn't have sent someone to kill him.
17th Sep '16 1:18:08 PM Twoeyesshort
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*** Then there's the possibility that the reason she seemingly shows so much favoritism towards Chip is because he's... well... [[VisualPun chipped.]] Sounds kind of funny at first, until you realize that means he was almost killed as a teacup, and since the crack running down him would mean he has less structural integrity than any of the other teacups, of course Mrs. Potts would want to keep him at her side at all times, for his own safety.
4th Sep '16 9:50:19 PM BroTim11
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** There's also the question of whether they protested when the Prince turned the woman away and ordered her out.



* Gaston's motivations are, to a child, reprehensible but not foul: he wants to marry Belle like moms and dads are married, live together, eat dinner together, etc. After you think about it as a grown-up (or at least a teen), though, it becomes quite obvious that "marry" is a euphemism for the fact that ''he wants to rape her'', turning him from "[[{{Jerkass}} bad man]]" to "disgusting sack of shit." Creepier, he did want to be married as mums and dads are married, her cooking and cleaning and giving birth to strapping boys, but with no personality of her own. And then you realize he could have had anyone of those blonde women and he knows it - he just wants to take away the personhood of the beautiful but strange woman, because that would be winning. Gaston is indeed first and foremost a hunter, and Belle is simply prey to him, and the only thing so far that has eluded him. That alone makes the whole dynamic very, very creepy. This FridgeHorror is best captured in the one scene when Gaston bursts into Belle's house to "propose" to her -- following her around the room, backing her against walls, knocking over furniture, trying to kiss her, and all with a disturbing, almost ''hungry'' look on his face. As an adult, you wonder how far he would have gone if Belle hadn't thrown him out.

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* Given that the servants were turned into every kind of household object from chairs to tableware, does this mean that there's a toilet that used to be a person? How awful must that guy's life be...
* Gaston's motivations are, to a child, reprehensible but not foul: he wants to marry Belle like moms and dads are married, live together, eat dinner together, etc. After you think about it as a grown-up (or at least a teen), though, it becomes quite obvious that "marry" is a euphemism for the fact that ''he wants to rape her'', turning him from "[[{{Jerkass}} bad man]]" to "disgusting sack of shit." Creepier, he did want to be married as mums and dads are married, her cooking and cleaning and giving birth to strapping boys, but with no personality of her own. And then you realize he could have had anyone of those blonde women and he knows it - he just wants to take away the personhood of the beautiful but strange woman, because that would be winning. winning. Gaston is indeed first and foremost a hunter, and Belle is simply prey to him, and the only thing so far that has eluded him. him. That alone makes the whole dynamic very, very creepy. creepy. This FridgeHorror is best captured in the one scene when Gaston bursts into Belle's house to "propose" to her -- following her around the room, backing her against walls, knocking over furniture, trying to kiss her, and all with a disturbing, almost ''hungry'' look on his face. face. As an adult, you wonder how far he would have gone if Belle hadn't thrown him out.
11th Aug '16 1:56:22 PM Morgenthaler
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* Many see the Enchantress going overboard by punishing the servants too. Yet, she had two reasons: first, in older times servants tended to share the fate of their lord, enjoying the rewards granted to them by higher powers and being punished with them for their sins (see [[TheBible the Plagues of Egypt]] or [[TheIliad the plague Apollo visited on Agamemnon's army]] for two examples), thus they share his punishment; second, ''they were responsible for his upbringing'', meaning they ''do'' have a fault in him denying hospitality by making him a spoiled jerk.

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* Many see the Enchantress going overboard by punishing the servants too. Yet, she had two reasons: first, in older times servants tended to share the fate of their lord, enjoying the rewards granted to them by higher powers and being punished with them for their sins (see [[TheBible [[Literature/TheBible the Plagues of Egypt]] or [[TheIliad [[Literature/TheIliad the plague Apollo visited on Agamemnon's army]] for two examples), thus they share his punishment; second, ''they were responsible for his upbringing'', meaning they ''do'' have a fault in him denying hospitality by making him a spoiled jerk.
15th Jul '16 10:04:54 AM MrDeath
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* The Beast was punished, not for his inhospitality, but for discriminating against ugly people. He wasn't "doomed by witch magic" before he, when the old hag turned into a beautiful woman, grovelled at her feet. She may not have considered that such displays of magic freak people out.

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* The Beast was punished, not for his inhospitality, but for discriminating against ugly people. He wasn't "doomed by witch magic" before he, when the old hag turned into a beautiful woman, grovelled at her feet. She may not have considered that such displays of magic freak people out.
15th Jul '16 9:42:28 AM Ymirsdaughter
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* The Beast was punished, not for his inhospitality, but for discriminating against ugly people. He wasn't "doomed by witch magic" before he, when the old hag turned into a beautiful woman, grovelled at her feet. She may not have considered that such displays of magic freak people out.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.BeautyAndTheBeast