History Franchise / DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse

5th Apr '18 11:58:42 AM narm00
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** ''ComicBook/DoctorWhoSupremacyOfTheCybermen'': A five-part miniseries released bi-weekly in July-September 2016, crossing over the 9th, 10th, 11th, ''and'' 12th Doctor series in a story that follows on from certain events in "Hell Bent", the Series 9 finale of the television series. (Beware {{Late Arrival Spoiler}}s!)
** ''ComicBook/DoctorWhoTheLostDimension''

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** ''ComicBook/DoctorWhoSupremacyOfTheCybermen'': A five-part miniseries released bi-weekly in July-September 2016, crossing over the 9th, 10th, 11th, 11th ''and'' 12th Doctor series in a story that follows on from certain events in "Hell Bent", the Series 9 finale of the television series. (Beware {{Late Arrival Spoiler}}s!)
** ''ComicBook/DoctorWhoTheLostDimension''''ComicBook/DoctorWhoTheLostDimension'': An eight-part CrisisCrossover that ran through the 10th, 11th and 12th Doctor series and a number of special issues in August-November 2017.



* ''Literature/DoctorWhoNovelisations'': By Target. During the 70s and 80s, in the days before video took off, these were '''the''' way to catch up on previous ''Doctor Who'' stories. They retold (and frequently expanded on) the stories on TV, and several of them are highly acclaimed. Usually also available as audiobooks, read by the TV series actor(s). Almost every story from the classic series got a novelisation, with the TV Movie's being done by BBC Books; the five that didn't get one ("The Pirate Planet", "City of Death", "Shada", "Resurrection of the Daleks" and "Revelation of the Daleks") received fan novelisations courtesy of the New Zealand Doctor Who Fan Club. (If you noticed that three of the five are Douglas Adams stories, you're right. Adams wouldn't allow others to novelise his scripts, and - notorious procrastinator that he was - never did them himself. Also, with ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' having taken off in the meantime, Target Books was no longer able to afford the advances he commanded.) "Shada" eventually received an official novelisation by BBC Books in 2012, written by Gareth Roberts. "City of Death" also received a BBC novelisation in 2015; initially it was announced that it would again be by Roberts, but it was eventually written by ''Torchwood'' writer James Goss. A novelisation of "The Pirate Planet" by Goss came out in 2017, followed by his novelisation of another Adams-written work - the never-produced film ''Doctor Who and the Krikkitmen'' - in 2018. The first full novelisations of stories from the revival series are also set to appear in 2018: "Rose", written by Creator/RussellTDavies, "The Christmas Invasion", written by Jenny Colgan, "The Day of the Doctor", written by Creator/StevenMoffat, and "Twice Upon a Time", written by Creator/PaulCornell.

to:

* ''Literature/DoctorWhoNovelisations'': By Target. During the 70s and 80s, in the days before video took off, these were '''the''' way to catch up on previous ''Doctor Who'' stories. They retold (and frequently expanded on) the stories on TV, and several of them are highly acclaimed. Usually also available as audiobooks, read by the TV series actor(s). Almost every story from the classic series got a novelisation, with the TV Movie's being done by BBC Books; the five that didn't get one ("The Pirate Planet", "City of Death", "Shada", "Resurrection of the Daleks" and "Revelation of the Daleks") received fan novelisations courtesy of the New Zealand Doctor Who Fan Club. (If you noticed that three of the five are Douglas Adams stories, you're right. Adams wouldn't allow others to novelise his scripts, and - notorious procrastinator that he was - never did them himself. Also, with ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' having taken off in the meantime, Target Books was no longer able to afford the advances he commanded.) "Shada" eventually received an official novelisation by BBC Books in 2012, written by Gareth Roberts. "City of Death" also received a BBC novelisation in 2015; initially it was announced that it would again be by Roberts, but it was eventually written by ''Torchwood'' writer James Goss. A novelisation of "The Pirate Planet" by Goss came out in 2017, followed by his novelisation of another Adams-written work - the never-produced film ''Doctor Who and the Krikkitmen'' - in 2018. The first full novelisations of stories from the revival series are also set to appear were released in 2018: "Rose", written by Creator/RussellTDavies, "The Christmas Invasion", written by Jenny Colgan, "The Day of the Doctor", written by Creator/StevenMoffat, and "Twice Upon a Time", written by Creator/PaulCornell.



** An additional story featuring the Twelfth Doctor was released in 2014, which was also included in a new version of the collection, ''12 Doctors 12 Stories''.

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** An additional story featuring the Twelfth Doctor was released in 2014, which was also included in a new version of the collection, ''12 Doctors 12 Stories''. Another new version is due for release in 2018, ''13 Doctors 13 Stories'', including an additional story featuring the Thirteenth Doctor.
16th Mar '18 2:54:17 AM LondonKdS
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** The Big Finish continuity has Department C4, aka the Forge. The Forge was the most obvious influence on Torchwood, being specifically motivated by extreme British nationalism and oriented towards reverse-engineering alien technology for military purposes.

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** The Big Finish continuity has Department C4, aka the Forge. The Forge was the most obvious influence on Torchwood, being specifically motivated by extreme British nationalism and oriented towards reverse-engineering alien technology for military purposes. It also got a namecheck in a ''ComicBook/DoctorWhoTitan'' story.
10th Mar '18 12:13:44 PM moloch
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The Expanded Universe has branched in diverse ways into separate fully licensed and semi-official sub-continuities, divided (in some cases) by copyright restrictions. This is further complicated by the fact that no one person or company, including the BBC, owns all the rights to the monsters and characters which have appeared in the Whoniverse - the Doctor and the TARDIS are pretty much the only elements undeniably locked up by the BBC. Sometimes the varying strands acknowledge each other, sometimes they ignore each other, DependingOnTheWriter. Just how strongly linked any given series is to the TV series is debatable and can be very, very complicated. Unlike, for example, Paramount and ''Franchise/StarTrek'' or Lucasfilm/Disney and ''Franchise/StarWars'' the BBC has never come out and made a direct edict as to what is canonical and what isn't - as Creator/PaulCornell wrote about [[https://www.paulcornell.com/2007/02/canonicity-in-doctor-who/ here]], they have no interest in doing so (and BBC executives have no interest in fannish conceptions like "canon" anyway[[note]]And as Paul noted, as famous sticklers for grammar they'd say "canonical" and not "canon" anyway![[/note]]). The main limitation is that the BBC charter, as a public broadcaster, means that you must not be required to spend money to "complete the story", which the two DW showrunners have treated as meaning no viewer [[ContinuityLockout should be required to know a story outside the TV series or more than a few years old]] to understand this week's episode. Revived series Creator/RussellTDavies and Creator/StevenMoffat have both ridiculed the idea of the (novels/audios/comics) not "counting". This is helped along by the fact that (unlike ''Franchise/StarTrek'', say) ''Doctor Who'' writers are rarely limited to one particular medium. TV writers have gone on to write novels or comics or for Creator/BigFinish and vice versa. Many writers have taken the characters they created and own into their own spinoffs with little or no mention of their common TARDIS-shaped ancestor.

to:

The Expanded Universe has branched in diverse ways into separate fully licensed and semi-official sub-continuities, divided (in some cases) by copyright restrictions. This is further complicated by the fact that no one person or company, including the BBC, owns all the rights to the monsters and characters which have appeared in the Whoniverse - the Doctor and the TARDIS are pretty much the only elements undeniably locked up by the BBC. Sometimes the varying strands acknowledge each other, sometimes they ignore each other, DependingOnTheWriter. Just how strongly linked any given series is to the TV series is debatable and can be very, very complicated. Unlike, for example, Paramount and ''Franchise/StarTrek'' or Lucasfilm/Disney and ''Franchise/StarWars'' the BBC has never come out and made a direct edict as to what is canonical and what isn't - as Creator/PaulCornell wrote about [[https://www.paulcornell.com/2007/02/canonicity-in-doctor-who/ here]], they have no interest in doing so (and BBC executives have no interest in fannish conceptions like "canon" anyway[[note]]And as Paul noted, as famous sticklers for grammar they'd say "canonical" and not object to people using "canon" anyway![[/note]]).as an adjective when it should be "canonical", too![[/note]]). The main limitation is that the BBC charter, as a public broadcaster, means that you must not be required to spend money to "complete the story", which the two DW showrunners have treated as meaning no viewer [[ContinuityLockout should be required to know a story outside the TV series or more than a few years old]] to understand this week's episode. Revived series Creator/RussellTDavies and Creator/StevenMoffat have both ridiculed the idea of the (novels/audios/comics) not "counting". This is helped along by the fact that (unlike ''Franchise/StarTrek'', say) ''Doctor Who'' writers are rarely limited to one particular medium. TV writers have gone on to write novels or comics or for Creator/BigFinish and vice versa. Many writers have taken the characters they created and own into their own spinoffs with little or no mention of their common TARDIS-shaped ancestor.
27th Feb '18 6:17:46 AM moloch
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The Expanded Universe has branched in diverse ways into separate fully licensed and semi-official sub-continuities, divided (in some cases) by copyright restrictions. This is further complicated by the fact that no one person or company, including the BBC, owns all the rights to the monsters and characters which have appeared in the Whoniverse - the Doctor and the TARDIS are pretty much the only elements undeniably locked up by the BBC. Sometimes the varying strands acknowledge each other, sometimes they ignore each other, DependingOnTheWriter. Just how strongly linked any given series is to the TV series is debatable and can be very, very complicated. Unlike, for example, Paramount and ''Franchise/StarTrek'' or Lucasfilm/Disney and ''Franchise/StarWars'' the BBC has never come out and made a direct edict as to what is canonical and what isn't - as Creator/PaulCornell wrote about [[https://www.paulcornell.com/2007/02/canonicity-in-doctor-who/ here]], they have no interest in doing so (and BBC executives have no interest in fannish conceptions like "canon" anyway[[note]]And as Paul noted, as famous sticklers for grammar they'd say "canonical" and not "canon" anyway![[/note]]). The main limitation is that the BBC charter, as a public broadcaster, means that you must not be required to spend money to "complete the story", which DW showrunners treat as meaning no viewer should be ''required'' to know a story outside the TV series or more than a few years old to understand the episode. Revived series Creator/RussellTDavies and Creator/StevenMoffat have both ridiculed the idea of the (novels/audios/comics) not "counting". This is helped along by the fact that (unlike ''Franchise/StarTrek'', say) ''Doctor Who'' writers are rarely limited to one particular medium. TV writers have gone on to write novels or comics or for Creator/BigFinish and vice versa. Many writers have taken the characters they created and own into their own spinoffs with little or no mention of their common TARDIS-shaped ancestor.

to:

The Expanded Universe has branched in diverse ways into separate fully licensed and semi-official sub-continuities, divided (in some cases) by copyright restrictions. This is further complicated by the fact that no one person or company, including the BBC, owns all the rights to the monsters and characters which have appeared in the Whoniverse - the Doctor and the TARDIS are pretty much the only elements undeniably locked up by the BBC. Sometimes the varying strands acknowledge each other, sometimes they ignore each other, DependingOnTheWriter. Just how strongly linked any given series is to the TV series is debatable and can be very, very complicated. Unlike, for example, Paramount and ''Franchise/StarTrek'' or Lucasfilm/Disney and ''Franchise/StarWars'' the BBC has never come out and made a direct edict as to what is canonical and what isn't - as Creator/PaulCornell wrote about [[https://www.paulcornell.com/2007/02/canonicity-in-doctor-who/ here]], they have no interest in doing so (and BBC executives have no interest in fannish conceptions like "canon" anyway[[note]]And as Paul noted, as famous sticklers for grammar they'd say "canonical" and not "canon" anyway![[/note]]). The main limitation is that the BBC charter, as a public broadcaster, means that you must not be required to spend money to "complete the story", which the two DW showrunners treat have treated as meaning no viewer [[ContinuityLockout should be ''required'' required to know a story outside the TV series or more than a few years old old]] to understand the this week's episode. Revived series Creator/RussellTDavies and Creator/StevenMoffat have both ridiculed the idea of the (novels/audios/comics) not "counting". This is helped along by the fact that (unlike ''Franchise/StarTrek'', say) ''Doctor Who'' writers are rarely limited to one particular medium. TV writers have gone on to write novels or comics or for Creator/BigFinish and vice versa. Many writers have taken the characters they created and own into their own spinoffs with little or no mention of their common TARDIS-shaped ancestor.
27th Feb '18 6:01:54 AM moloch
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The Expanded Universe has branched in diverse ways into separate fully licensed and semi-official sub-continuities, divided (in some cases) by copyright restrictions. This is further complicated by the fact that no one person or company, including the BBC, owns all the rights to the monsters and characters which have appeared in the Whoniverse - the Doctor and the TARDIS are pretty much the only elements undeniably locked up by the BBC. Sometimes the varying strands acknowledge each other, sometimes they ignore each other, DependingOnTheWriter. Just how strongly linked any given series is to the TV series is debatable and can be very, very complicated. Unlike, for example, Paramount and ''Franchise/StarTrek'' or Lucasfilm/Disney and ''Franchise/StarWars'' the BBC has never come out and made a direct edict as to what is canonical and what isn't - as Creator/PaulCornell wrote about [[https://www.paulcornell.com/2007/02/canonicity-in-doctor-who/ here]], they have no interest in doing so (and BBC executives have no interest in fannish conceptions like "canon" anyway[[note]]And as Paul noted, as famous sticklers for grammar they'd say "canonical" and not "canon" anyway![[/note]]). The main limitation is that the BBC charter, as a public broadcaster, means that you must not be required to spend money to "complete the story", which DW showrunners treat as meaning no viewer should be ''required'' to know a story outside the TV series or more than a few years old to understand the episode. Revived series Creator/RussellTDavies and Creator/StevenMoffat have both ridiculed the idea of the (novels/audios/comics) not "counting". This is helped along by the fact that (unlike ''Franchise/StarTrek'', say) ''Doctor Who'' writers are rarely limited to one particular medium. TV writers have gone on to write novels or comics or for Creator/BigFinish and vice versa. Many writers have taken the characters they created and own into their own spinoffs with little or no mention of their common Doctor ancestor.

Since the return of the TV series, ideas from a diverse range of audio dramas, novels, and licensed DTV videos have all been [[CallBack referenced,]] [[MythologyGag alluded to]], [[CanonImmigrant directly imported]] and in only rare cases [RecursiveAdaptation directly adapted]][[note]]Amusingly, the only direct, unambiguous adaptation of an old story to TV is Paul Cornell's own [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E8HumanNature "Human Nature"]][[/note]] in TV series episodes. And many ExpandedUniverse stories and characters are adapted into ''other'' ExpandedUniverse stories and characters, which are then adapted for TV, which then spin off into more ExpandedUniverse stories... you get the idea. The TimeyWimeyBall, BroadStrokes and especially the MST3KMantra apply where necessary.

to:

The Expanded Universe has branched in diverse ways into separate fully licensed and semi-official sub-continuities, divided (in some cases) by copyright restrictions. This is further complicated by the fact that no one person or company, including the BBC, owns all the rights to the monsters and characters which have appeared in the Whoniverse - the Doctor and the TARDIS are pretty much the only elements undeniably locked up by the BBC. Sometimes the varying strands acknowledge each other, sometimes they ignore each other, DependingOnTheWriter. Just how strongly linked any given series is to the TV series is debatable and can be very, very complicated. Unlike, for example, Paramount and ''Franchise/StarTrek'' or Lucasfilm/Disney and ''Franchise/StarWars'' the BBC has never come out and made a direct edict as to what is canonical and what isn't - as Creator/PaulCornell wrote about [[https://www.paulcornell.com/2007/02/canonicity-in-doctor-who/ here]], they have no interest in doing so (and BBC executives have no interest in fannish conceptions like "canon" anyway[[note]]And as Paul noted, as famous sticklers for grammar they'd say "canonical" and not "canon" anyway![[/note]]). The main limitation is that the BBC charter, as a public broadcaster, means that you must not be required to spend money to "complete the story", which DW showrunners treat as meaning no viewer should be ''required'' to know a story outside the TV series or more than a few years old to understand the episode. Revived series Creator/RussellTDavies and Creator/StevenMoffat have both ridiculed the idea of the (novels/audios/comics) not "counting". This is helped along by the fact that (unlike ''Franchise/StarTrek'', say) ''Doctor Who'' writers are rarely limited to one particular medium. TV writers have gone on to write novels or comics or for Creator/BigFinish and vice versa. Many writers have taken the characters they created and own into their own spinoffs with little or no mention of their common Doctor TARDIS-shaped ancestor.

Since the return of the TV series, ideas from a diverse range of audio dramas, novels, and licensed DTV videos have all been [[CallBack referenced,]] [[MythologyGag alluded to]], [[CanonImmigrant directly imported]] (most notably [[Characters/DoctorWhoUNITStaff Kate Stewart]]) and in only some rare cases [RecursiveAdaptation [[RecursiveAdaptation directly adapted]][[note]]Amusingly, the only direct, unambiguous adaptation of an old story to TV is Paul Cornell's own [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E8HumanNature "Human Nature"]][[/note]] in TV series episodes. And many ExpandedUniverse stories and characters are adapted into ''other'' ExpandedUniverse stories and characters, which are then adapted for TV, which then spin off into more ExpandedUniverse stories... you get the idea. The TimeyWimeyBall, BroadStrokes and especially the MST3KMantra apply where necessary.



In short: the ''Doctor Who'' Expanded Universe is a never-ending rabbit hole of stories. It's all tangled and full of BroadStrokes, and those who expect consistency, or even, in some cases, sanity, are in for a confusing ride. But the sheer importance and impact of the ExpandedUniverse to the TV series proper is tremendous: numerous post-2005 Franchise/{{Whoniverse}} writers (and quite a few actors) got their start in ''Doctor Who'' in its expanded universe, and everyone involved with the current TV show has been heavily influenced by the EU's stories.

to:

In short: the ''Doctor Who'' Expanded Universe is a never-ending rabbit hole of stories. It's all tangled and full of BroadStrokes, and those who expect consistency, or even, in some cases, sanity, are in for a confusing ride. But the sheer importance and impact of the ExpandedUniverse to the TV series proper is tremendous: numerous post-2005 Franchise/{{Whoniverse}} writers (and quite a few actors) got their start in ''Doctor Who'' in its expanded universe, and everyone involved with the current TV show has been heavily influenced by the EU's stories.
stories. In the years since the 50th Anniversary, the production team at the BBC have even aided the slow erasure of the boundaries between the "old" and "new" series, so that, for instance, Series 5 of ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' is produced by Creator/BigFinish, and [[Franchise/BerniceSummerfield Benny Summerfield]] can meet the Characters/TwelfthDoctor.
27th Feb '18 5:54:15 AM moloch
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In late 1963 we had ''Series/DoctorWho'', the series which spawned the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}}. Then in 1964, in the pages of ''TV Comic'', a ''Doctor Who'' spin-off comic started. It was the first part of what would become the ''Doctor Who'' ExpandedUniverse: a never-ending supply of stories with many different branches, timelines and continuities, which have a strong tendency to reference each other and mutually contradict each other in the same breath. Just how strongly linked its continuity is to that of the TV series is "debatable" and very, very complicated. For its part, according to franchise writer Paul Cornell and other sources, the BBC has never come out and made a direct edict as to what is canon and what isn't (unlike, for example, Paramount re: Star Trek and Lucasfilm/Disney re: Star Wars). And in fact the TV series itself has attempted to roll some of the expanded universe into the TV continuity by making direct references to audio dramas, novels, and incorporating one character (Kate Stewart) who was introduced in a non-BBC spin-off work.

The Expanded Universe has branched in diverse ways into separate fully licensed and semi-official sub-continuities, divided (in some cases) by the BBC's copyright restrictions. This is further complicated by the fact that no one person, including the BBC, owns all the rights to the monsters and characters which have appeared in the Whoniverse (The Doctor being pretty much the only character who is undeniably locked up by the BBC). Sometimes the varying franchises acknowledge each other, sometimes they ignore each other, DependingOnTheWriter.

Since the return of the TV series, a large number of ExpandedUniverse stories and characters have been [[RecursiveAdaptation directly adapted]] into (or just referenced in) TV series episodes. And many ExpandedUniverse stories and characters are adapted into ''other'' ExpandedUniverse stories and characters, which are then adapted for TV, which then spin off into more ExpandedUniverse stories... you get the idea. The TimeyWimeyBall, BroadStrokes and especially the MST3KMantra apply where necessary.

to:

In late 1963 we had ''Series/DoctorWho'', the series which spawned the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}}. Then in 1964, in the pages of ''TV Comic'', a ''Doctor Who'' spin-off comic started. It was the first part of what would become the ''Doctor Who'' ExpandedUniverse: a never-ending supply of stories with many different branches, timelines and continuities, which have a strong tendency to reference each other and mutually contradict each other in the same breath. Just how strongly linked its continuity is to that of the TV series is "debatable" and very, very complicated. For its part, according to franchise writer Paul Cornell and other sources, the BBC has never come out and made a direct edict as to what is canon and what isn't (unlike, for example, Paramount re: Star Trek and Lucasfilm/Disney re: Star Wars). And in fact the TV series itself has attempted to roll some of the expanded universe into the TV continuity by making direct references to audio dramas, novels, and incorporating one character (Kate Stewart) who was introduced in a non-BBC spin-off work.\n\nThe Expanded Universe has branched in diverse ways into separate fully licensed and semi-official sub-continuities, divided (in some cases) by the BBC's copyright restrictions. This is further complicated by the fact that no one person, including the BBC, owns all the rights to the monsters and characters which have appeared in the Whoniverse (The Doctor being pretty much the only character who is undeniably locked up by the BBC). Sometimes the varying franchises acknowledge each other, sometimes they ignore each other, DependingOnTheWriter. \n\nSince the return of the TV series, a large number of ExpandedUniverse stories and characters have been [[RecursiveAdaptation directly adapted]] into (or just referenced in) TV series episodes. And many ExpandedUniverse stories and characters are adapted into ''other'' ExpandedUniverse stories and characters, which are then adapted for TV, which then spin off into more ExpandedUniverse stories... you get the idea. The TimeyWimeyBall, BroadStrokes and especially the MST3KMantra apply where necessary.



The "wilderness years" also spawned numerous FanWork stories, typically involving the then-cancelled TV series' actors and crew in some way. These include the ''AudioPlay/DoctorWhoAudioVisuals'' (which eventually became the official Creator/BigFinish production studio) and various BBV productions. The people responsible for these FanWork productions ended up directly involved in ''Doctor Who'' proper, and many of the concepts became AscendedFanon.

to:

!! The Perennially Thorny Question of Doctor Who Canon
The Expanded Universe has branched in diverse ways into separate fully licensed and semi-official sub-continuities, divided (in some cases) by copyright restrictions. This is further complicated by the fact that no one person or company, including the BBC, owns all the rights to the monsters and characters which have appeared in the Whoniverse - the Doctor and the TARDIS are pretty much the only elements undeniably locked up by the BBC. Sometimes the varying strands acknowledge each other, sometimes they ignore each other, DependingOnTheWriter. Just how strongly linked any given series is to the TV series is debatable and can be very, very complicated. Unlike, for example, Paramount and ''Franchise/StarTrek'' or Lucasfilm/Disney and ''Franchise/StarWars'' the BBC has never come out and made a direct edict as to what is canonical and what isn't - as Creator/PaulCornell wrote about [[https://www.paulcornell.com/2007/02/canonicity-in-doctor-who/ here]], they have no interest in doing so (and BBC executives have no interest in fannish conceptions like "canon" anyway[[note]]And as Paul noted, as famous sticklers for grammar they'd say "canonical" and not "canon" anyway![[/note]]). The main limitation is that the BBC charter, as a public broadcaster, means that you must not be required to spend money to "complete the story", which DW showrunners treat as meaning no viewer should be ''required'' to know a story outside the TV series or more than a few years old to understand the episode. Revived series Creator/RussellTDavies and Creator/StevenMoffat have both ridiculed the idea of the (novels/audios/comics) not "counting". This is helped along by the fact that (unlike ''Franchise/StarTrek'', say) ''Doctor Who'' writers are rarely limited to one particular medium. TV writers have gone on to write novels or comics or for Creator/BigFinish and vice versa. Many writers have taken the characters they created and own into their own spinoffs with little or no mention of their common Doctor ancestor.

Since the return of the TV series, ideas from a diverse range of audio dramas, novels, and licensed DTV videos have all been [[CallBack referenced,]] [[MythologyGag alluded to]], [[CanonImmigrant directly imported]] and in only rare cases [RecursiveAdaptation directly adapted]][[note]]Amusingly, the only direct, unambiguous adaptation of an old story to TV is Paul Cornell's own [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E8HumanNature "Human Nature"]][[/note]] in TV series episodes. And many ExpandedUniverse stories and characters are adapted into ''other'' ExpandedUniverse stories and characters, which are then adapted for TV, which then spin off into more ExpandedUniverse stories... you get the idea. The TimeyWimeyBall, BroadStrokes and especially the MST3KMantra apply where necessary.

The "wilderness years" also spawned numerous FanWork stories, typically involving the then-cancelled TV series' actors and crew in some way. These include the ''AudioPlay/DoctorWhoAudioVisuals'' (which eventually (many of those involved became the nucleus of the official Creator/BigFinish production studio) and various BBV productions.productions (which blurred the lined between "official" and "fan" work, as the concepts were legally licenced from the rights holders). The people responsible for these FanWork productions ended up directly involved in ''Doctor Who'' proper, and many of the concepts became AscendedFanon.
20th Jan '18 7:43:22 PM moloch
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* ''Theatre/TheCurseOfTheDaleks'', a 1964 stage play serving as an {{Interquel}} between the first Dalek story, "The Daleks", and their second, "The Dalek Invasion of Earth". (The earlier ''The Dalek Chronicles'' comics had done the same.) It did not feature the Doctor or any of his companions.

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* ''Theatre/TheCurseOfTheDaleks'', ''[[Recap/BigFinishDoctorWhoTheCurseOfTheDaleks The Curse Of The Daleks]]'', a 1964 stage play serving as an {{Interquel}} between the first Dalek story, "The Daleks", and their second, "The Dalek Invasion of Earth". (The earlier ''The Dalek Chronicles'' comics had done the same.) It did not feature the Doctor or any of his companions. Adapted by Creator/BigFinish.
18th Jan '18 8:56:57 AM narm00
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* ''Literature/DoctorWhoNovelisations'': By Target. During the 70s and 80s, in the days before video took off, these were '''the''' way to catch up on previous ''Doctor Who'' stories. They retold (and frequently expanded on) the stories on TV, and several of them are highly acclaimed. Usually also available as audiobooks, read by the TV series actor(s). Almost every story from the classic series got a novelisation, with the TV Movie's being done by BBC Books; the five that didn't get one ("The Pirate Planet", "City of Death", "Shada", "Resurrection of the Daleks" and "Revelation of the Daleks") received fan novelisations courtesy of the New Zealand Doctor Who Fan Club. (If you noticed that three of the five are Douglas Adams stories, you're right. Adams wouldn't allow others to novelise his scripts, and - notorious procrastinator that he was - never did them himself. Also, with ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' having taken off in the meantime, Target Books was no longer able to afford the advances he commanded.) "Shada" eventually received an official novelisation by BBC Books in 2012, written by Gareth Roberts. "City of Death" also received a BBC novelisation in 2015; initially it was announced that it would again be by Roberts, but it was eventually written by ''Torchwood'' writer James Goss. A novelisation of "The Pirate Planet" by Goss came out in 2017, with another Adams-written work - the never-produced ''Doctor Who and the Krikkitmen'' - scheduled to be adapted by Goss for 2018 release. Also scheduled for 2018 are the first full novelisations of stories from the revival series: "Rose", written by Creator/RussellTDavies, "The Christmas Invasion", written by Jenny Colgan, "The Day of the Doctor", written by Creator/StevenMoffat, and "Twice Upon a Time", written by Creator/PaulCornell.

to:

* ''Literature/DoctorWhoNovelisations'': By Target. During the 70s and 80s, in the days before video took off, these were '''the''' way to catch up on previous ''Doctor Who'' stories. They retold (and frequently expanded on) the stories on TV, and several of them are highly acclaimed. Usually also available as audiobooks, read by the TV series actor(s). Almost every story from the classic series got a novelisation, with the TV Movie's being done by BBC Books; the five that didn't get one ("The Pirate Planet", "City of Death", "Shada", "Resurrection of the Daleks" and "Revelation of the Daleks") received fan novelisations courtesy of the New Zealand Doctor Who Fan Club. (If you noticed that three of the five are Douglas Adams stories, you're right. Adams wouldn't allow others to novelise his scripts, and - notorious procrastinator that he was - never did them himself. Also, with ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' having taken off in the meantime, Target Books was no longer able to afford the advances he commanded.) "Shada" eventually received an official novelisation by BBC Books in 2012, written by Gareth Roberts. "City of Death" also received a BBC novelisation in 2015; initially it was announced that it would again be by Roberts, but it was eventually written by ''Torchwood'' writer James Goss. A novelisation of "The Pirate Planet" by Goss came out in 2017, with followed by his novelisation of another Adams-written work - the never-produced film ''Doctor Who and the Krikkitmen'' - scheduled to be adapted by Goss for 2018 release. Also scheduled for 2018 are the in 2018. The first full novelisations of stories from the revival series: series are also set to appear in 2018: "Rose", written by Creator/RussellTDavies, "The Christmas Invasion", written by Jenny Colgan, "The Day of the Doctor", written by Creator/StevenMoffat, and "Twice Upon a Time", written by Creator/PaulCornell.



* ''Doctor Who meets the World of Hargreaves'': A series of books by Adam Hargreaves, current writer of the ''Literature/MrMen'' books, featuring the Doctors {{in the style of}} ''Mr. Men'', with one book for each of the first twelve Doctors, plus an extra [[ChristmasEpisode Christmas book]] for Ten. Share a trope page with ''Mr. Men''.

to:

* ''Doctor Who meets the World of Hargreaves'': Hargreaves'' (aka ''Dr Men''): A series of books by Adam Hargreaves, current writer of the ''Literature/MrMen'' books, featuring the Doctors {{in the style of}} ''Mr. Men'', with one book for each of the first twelve Doctors, plus an extra [[ChristmasEpisode Christmas book]] for Ten. Share a trope page with ''Mr. Men''.
13th Jan '18 3:28:46 PM HelloLamppost
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* ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'': Created after the show was cancelled, as an official continuation of the adventures of the Seventh Doctor and, initially, Ace. Also known as "Virgin New Adventures", after their publisher. Choosing to aim for an audience of 25 and up fans and readers of ScienceFiction (versus targeting a younger, less reverent demographic, as they also considered), they made both the Doctor and the tone of the entire franchise DarkerAndEdgier. They also made the stories a bit harder on the MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness (the television series had gone in that direction anyway). The novels (more because of the creativity of the fans-turned-authors RunningTheAsylum than by ExecutiveMeddling) riffed over each other's contributions. Future ShowRunner Creator/RussellTDavies contributed one of the novels, ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoNewAdventuresDamagedGoods Damaged Goods]]''. Other writers for the New Adventures would later write for the 2005 revival series. The penultimate New Adventures novel featuring the Doctor, ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoNewAdventuresLungbarrow Lungbarrow]]'' by Creator/MarcPlatt, also went into the Doctor's secret BackStory, hinted about onscreen. After Virgin lost the licence, they decided they'd accumulated enough world-building to continue without him, and continued for two more years to release "New Adventures" novels (without the "Doctor Who") featuring characters original to the series; in particular, the series shifted its focus to:

to:

* ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'': Created after the show was cancelled, as an official continuation of the adventures of the Seventh Doctor and, initially, Ace. Also known as "Virgin New Adventures", after their publisher. Choosing to aim for an audience of 25 and up fans and readers of ScienceFiction (versus targeting a younger, less reverent demographic, as they also considered), they made both the Doctor and the tone of the entire franchise DarkerAndEdgier. They also made the stories a bit harder on the MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness (the television series had gone in that direction anyway).MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness. The novels (more because of the creativity of the fans-turned-authors RunningTheAsylum than by ExecutiveMeddling) riffed over each other's contributions. Future ShowRunner Creator/RussellTDavies contributed one of the novels, ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoNewAdventuresDamagedGoods Damaged Goods]]''. Other writers for the New Adventures would later write for the 2005 revival series. The penultimate New Adventures novel featuring the Doctor, ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoNewAdventuresLungbarrow Lungbarrow]]'' by Creator/MarcPlatt, also went into the Doctor's secret BackStory, hinted about onscreen. After Virgin lost the licence, they decided they'd accumulated enough world-building to continue without him, and continued for two more years to release "New Adventures" novels (without the "Doctor Who") featuring characters original to the series; in particular, the series shifted its focus to:
14th Dec '17 10:26:36 AM narm00
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* ''Literature/DoctorWhoNovelisations'': By Target. During the 70s and 80s, in the days before video took off, these were '''the''' way to catch up on previous ''Doctor Who'' stories. They retold (and frequently expanded on) the stories on TV, and several of them are highly acclaimed. Usually also available as audiobooks, read by the TV series actor(s). Almost every story from the classic series got a novelisation, with the TV Movie's being done by BBC Books; the five that didn't get one ("The Pirate Planet", "City of Death", "Shada", "Resurrection of the Daleks" and "Revelation of the Daleks") received fan novelisations courtesy of the New Zealand Doctor Who Fan Club. (If you noticed that three of the five are Douglas Adams stories, you're right. Adams wouldn't allow others to novelise his scripts, and -- notorious procrastinator that he was -- never did them himself. Also, with ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' having taken off in the meantime, Target Books was no longer able to afford the advances he commanded.) "Shada" eventually received an official novelisation by BBC Books in 2012, written by Gareth Roberts. "City of Death" also received a BBC novelisation in 2015; initially it was announced that it would again be by Roberts, but it was eventually written by ''Torchwood'' writer James Goss. A novelisation of "The Pirate Planet" by Goss came out in 2017, with another Adams-written work - the never-produced film ''Doctor Who and the Krikkitmen'' - scheduled to be adapted by Goss for 2018 release. Other than a few children's books published in 2010, there've been no full novelisations of anything past the TV Movie. That said, the first two seasons of ''The Sarah Jane Adventures'' were adapted into novels, Creator/NeilGaiman was invited to adapt his 2011 episode "The Doctor's Wife", and the short story collection ''The Story of Martha'' was a partial adaptation of the Series 3 finale, so others may be possible in the future.

to:

* ''Literature/DoctorWhoNovelisations'': By Target. During the 70s and 80s, in the days before video took off, these were '''the''' way to catch up on previous ''Doctor Who'' stories. They retold (and frequently expanded on) the stories on TV, and several of them are highly acclaimed. Usually also available as audiobooks, read by the TV series actor(s). Almost every story from the classic series got a novelisation, with the TV Movie's being done by BBC Books; the five that didn't get one ("The Pirate Planet", "City of Death", "Shada", "Resurrection of the Daleks" and "Revelation of the Daleks") received fan novelisations courtesy of the New Zealand Doctor Who Fan Club. (If you noticed that three of the five are Douglas Adams stories, you're right. Adams wouldn't allow others to novelise his scripts, and -- - notorious procrastinator that he was -- - never did them himself. Also, with ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' having taken off in the meantime, Target Books was no longer able to afford the advances he commanded.) "Shada" eventually received an official novelisation by BBC Books in 2012, written by Gareth Roberts. "City of Death" also received a BBC novelisation in 2015; initially it was announced that it would again be by Roberts, but it was eventually written by ''Torchwood'' writer James Goss. A novelisation of "The Pirate Planet" by Goss came out in 2017, with another Adams-written work - the never-produced film ''Doctor Who and the Krikkitmen'' - scheduled to be adapted by Goss for 2018 release. Other than a few children's books published in 2010, there've been no Also scheduled for 2018 are the first full novelisations of anything past stories from the TV Movie. That said, the first two seasons of ''The Sarah Jane Adventures'' were adapted into novels, Creator/NeilGaiman was invited to adapt his 2011 episode revival series: "Rose", written by Creator/RussellTDavies, "The Doctor's Wife", and the short story collection ''The Story of Martha'' was a partial adaptation Christmas Invasion", written by Jenny Colgan, "The Day of the Series 3 finale, so others may be possible in the future.Doctor", written by Creator/StevenMoffat, and "Twice Upon a Time", written by Creator/PaulCornell.



* ''Myths and Legends'': Much like ''Time Lord Fairy Tales'', this is a 2017 collection of short stories by Richard Dinnick adapting stories from Myth/ClassicalMythology to the Whoniverse.



* ''Doctor Who meets the World of Hargreaves'': A series of books by Adam Hargreaves, current writer of the ''Literature/MrMen'' books, featuring the Doctors {{in the style of}} ''Mr. Men'', with one book for each of the first twelve Doctors, plus an extra [[ChristmasEpisode Christmas book]] for Ten.

to:

* ''Doctor Who meets the World of Hargreaves'': A series of books by Adam Hargreaves, current writer of the ''Literature/MrMen'' books, featuring the Doctors {{in the style of}} ''Mr. Men'', with one book for each of the first twelve Doctors, plus an extra [[ChristmasEpisode Christmas book]] for Ten. Share a trope page with ''Mr. Men''.
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