History Film / Threads

17th Nov '15 9:23:23 PM Gideoncrawle
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Misuse of Cycle Of Revenge, should be Serial Escalation. Don't include Useful Notes articles in trope lists.
* BritishAccents: Sheffield specifically.

* UsefulNotes/ColdWar: The film was set and released during the height of the Cold War. It's deliberately left unclear as to who launched the first attack (although narration stating that the Soviets make their attack "when it's around 2AM in Washington, when the President is asleep and Western response will be slowest" implies the Soviets may have launched first). Television announcements in the background state that the Soviets invaded Iran, and that this led to some sort of escalation from each side using tactical nuclear weapons on bases in the Middle-East to eventually a full-scale strategic nuclear exchange.

* CycleOfRevenge: The escalation scenario that leads to Armageddon in the first place. After a coup in Iran, the Soviet Union invades to gain a toehold in the Middle East. The Americans send in paratroopers and set a deadline for withdrawal, and when the Soviets don't back down they send bombers after their main staging base in Iran. The Soviets destroy most of the aircraft with a nuclear-tipped air defense missile. The Americans then destroy the base with a single battlefield nuke. In return the Soviets nuke the aircraft carrier ''Kitty Hawk'', the Americans blockade Cuba, [[SicklyGreenGlow and after that it gets kind of hazy...]]

Added DiffLines:
* CycleOfRevenge: SerialEscalation: The escalation scenario that leads to Armageddon in the first place. After a coup in Iran, the Soviet Union invades to gain a toehold in the Middle East. The Americans send in paratroopers and set a deadline for withdrawal, and when the Soviets don't back down they send bombers after their main staging base in Iran. The Soviets destroy most of the aircraft with a nuclear-tipped air defense missile. The Americans then destroy the base with a single battlefield nuke. In return the Soviets nuke the aircraft carrier ''Kitty Hawk'', the Americans blockade Cuba, [[SicklyGreenGlow and after that it gets kind of hazy...]]
3rd Nov '15 10:10:55 PM Cindylover1969
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
(P.S. Unlike the equally depressing but less gory ''The Day After'', ''Threads'' has to this day '''never''' been shown again on British television.)
1st Nov '15 2:53:47 AM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message
!!Provides Examples Of:
to:
!!Provides Examples Of: !!This film provides examples of:
8th Oct '15 2:59:07 PM roiunl
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* DownerEnding: At any given point after the attack, it's hard to imagine that things could get much worse. Until they do. So, just as humanity seems to have limped along into an early industrial age era, narrowly avoiding the complete annihilation of the species, we are given a glimpse of [[spoiler:the second generation of post-war babies]], which decidedly [[HopeSpot quells any lingering hope]] viewers may have been desperately clinging to.
to:
* DownerEnding: At any given point after the attack, it's hard to imagine that things could get much worse. Until they do. So, just as humanity seems to have limped along into an early industrial age era, a second medieval age, narrowly avoiding the complete annihilation of the species, we are given a glimpse of [[spoiler:the second generation of post-war babies]], which decidedly [[HopeSpot quells any lingering hope]] viewers may have been desperately clinging to.
1st Oct '15 1:28:59 AM WillDraco
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* FacelessGoons: Justified as soldiers are wearing gas masks against airbourne radioactive particles and diseases. A policeman at the detention centre has a [[FacialHorror burn mask covering his face]].
to:
* FacelessGoons: Justified as soldiers are wearing gas masks against airbourne radioactive particles and diseases. A policeman (really just a deputized traffic warden, the British equivalent of a meter maid) at the detention centre has a [[FacialHorror burn mask covering his face]].
4th Sep '15 6:17:39 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The film depicts the terrifying consequences of [[UsefulNotes/NuclearWeapons nuclear warfare]] upon an unsuspecting world. Set mainly in [[OopNorth Sheffield]] during the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, ''Threads'' follows two families, the Becketts and the Kemps, amongst the other members of their town, as they deal with the absolute destruction of their society as a result of nuclear war with the Soviet Union (which at the time of release was [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar somewhat more likely]] [[HistoryMarchesOn than it is today]]). The findings of the 1955 ''Strath Report'' noted that the UK was singularly vulnerable to a nuclear exchange due to the country's small size, high urban population, and dependency upon food-imports[[note]] [Assuming the use of ten ten-megaton hydrogen bombs, the minimum number the report thought needed to render the UK militarily useless in a war] "'''Blast and heat''' would be the dominant hazard, accounting for more than '''9 million fatal casualties against less than 3 million fatal casualties from radiation''' [of a total UK population of 51 million]. [...] On the basis of an attack with ten bombs we also reckon that, in addition to casualties, a '''further 13 million people''' - many of them suffering from radiation sickness - would be '''pinned down in their houses or shelters for at least a week'''. Evacuation would increase this number. [...] It would be quite '''unrealistic to hope to maintain anything like normal medical standards''' [...] the '''chief difficulty would be to distinguish those who, in addition to having received burns or other injuries, had also been exposed to a lethal dose of radiation and who would therefore ultimately die, and on whom it would be wasteful to expend scarce medical resources'''. [...] An attack upon the largest towns with ten hydrogen bombs would totally disrupt the industrial and commercial life of the country. Direct damage would be concentrated near the points of attack but these are likely to contain about one-third of the population and about half the industry. The normal communication and transport systems would come to a stop and the inability to move food, fuel, and material would also stop ordinary social and economic processes. The whole mechanism of money transactions would be disrupted. [...] Commercial '''stocks of food would suffer heavy loss'''. These losses would further deplete available supplies. In the period immediately after the attack the widespread contamination from fall-out would make internal '''distribution of whatever stocks were available virtually impossible''' in large parts of the country. People in areas of severe fall-out would, therefore, have to depend for a week or more on the food which they had stored in their shelters and homes at the time the bombs fell. [...] These considerations suggest that those who survive the attack would have to live for a '''considerable period under siege conditions''', and that the '''risk of starvation would be very real''' unless as substantial strategic reserve of food had been accumulated and distributed about the country in peace. It would, moreover, be essential that the '''Government should be in a position to take immediate and effective control over all food stocks and over their distribution'''. [...] The initial phase of attack would be succeeded by a critical period during which the surviving population would be struggling against disease, starvation, and the unimaginable psychological effects of nuclear bombardment. But provided what was left of the nation could get through that period and the survivors were able to devote their resources to the work of reorganising the country, they should eventually be able to produce a wide enough range of goods to meet ordinary civilian needs. The standard of living of the reduced population, althrough substantially lower than at present, would still be well above that of the greater part of the world. [...] there would be '''no hope of providing anything approaching peacetime standards of medical care''' [...] Research should be carried forward into methods of decontaminating water [even today there are no practical ones] [...] Plans should be made for the emergency distribution of limited supplies of drinking water pending the restoration of mains supplies [...] Plans should be prepared to enable the police and the courts to operate quickly and effectively under the conditions foreseen [...] In some parts of the country, particularly if several bombs fell in the same area, there '''might be complete chaos for a time and civil control would collapse'''. In such circumstances the '''local military commander would have to be prepared to take over''' from the civil authority responsibility for the maintenance of law and order and for the administration of Government. He would, if called upon, exercise his existing common-law powers to '''take whatever steps, however drastic, he considered necessary to restore order'''. [...] The '''ordinary machinery of the courts and prisons could not operate'''. Plans were made during the last war for '''"war zone courts" to function in areas which were involved in military operations'''. These plans should now be examined to see if a simple scheme could be worked out for the prompt dismissal of criminal cases." [[/note]] The film reflects this fairly accurate assessment of the UK's likely situation with what the uninformed might call a hopeless and pessimistic outset - ending with a medieval world where agriculture predominates, starvation is ever-present, modern medicine doesn't exist, martial law prevails, capital punishment is routine, children are undereducated savages, the ozone layer is gone, and Survival Of The Fittest is the only way to get by.
to:
The film depicts the terrifying consequences of [[UsefulNotes/NuclearWeapons nuclear warfare]] upon an unsuspecting world. Set mainly in [[OopNorth Sheffield]] during the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, ''Threads'' follows two families, the Becketts and the Kemps, amongst the other members of their town, as they deal with the absolute destruction of their society as a result of nuclear war with the Soviet Union (which at the time of release was [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar somewhat more likely]] [[HistoryMarchesOn [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp than it is today]]). The findings of the 1955 ''Strath Report'' noted that the UK was singularly vulnerable to a nuclear exchange due to the country's small size, high urban population, and dependency upon food-imports[[note]] [Assuming the use of ten ten-megaton hydrogen bombs, the minimum number the report thought needed to render the UK militarily useless in a war] "'''Blast and heat''' would be the dominant hazard, accounting for more than '''9 million fatal casualties against less than 3 million fatal casualties from radiation''' [of a total UK population of 51 million]. [...] On the basis of an attack with ten bombs we also reckon that, in addition to casualties, a '''further 13 million people''' - many of them suffering from radiation sickness - would be '''pinned down in their houses or shelters for at least a week'''. Evacuation would increase this number. [...] It would be quite '''unrealistic to hope to maintain anything like normal medical standards''' [...] the '''chief difficulty would be to distinguish those who, in addition to having received burns or other injuries, had also been exposed to a lethal dose of radiation and who would therefore ultimately die, and on whom it would be wasteful to expend scarce medical resources'''. [...] An attack upon the largest towns with ten hydrogen bombs would totally disrupt the industrial and commercial life of the country. Direct damage would be concentrated near the points of attack but these are likely to contain about one-third of the population and about half the industry. The normal communication and transport systems would come to a stop and the inability to move food, fuel, and material would also stop ordinary social and economic processes. The whole mechanism of money transactions would be disrupted. [...] Commercial '''stocks of food would suffer heavy loss'''. These losses would further deplete available supplies. In the period immediately after the attack the widespread contamination from fall-out would make internal '''distribution of whatever stocks were available virtually impossible''' in large parts of the country. People in areas of severe fall-out would, therefore, have to depend for a week or more on the food which they had stored in their shelters and homes at the time the bombs fell. [...] These considerations suggest that those who survive the attack would have to live for a '''considerable period under siege conditions''', and that the '''risk of starvation would be very real''' unless as substantial strategic reserve of food had been accumulated and distributed about the country in peace. It would, moreover, be essential that the '''Government should be in a position to take immediate and effective control over all food stocks and over their distribution'''. [...] The initial phase of attack would be succeeded by a critical period during which the surviving population would be struggling against disease, starvation, and the unimaginable psychological effects of nuclear bombardment. But provided what was left of the nation could get through that period and the survivors were able to devote their resources to the work of reorganising the country, they should eventually be able to produce a wide enough range of goods to meet ordinary civilian needs. The standard of living of the reduced population, althrough substantially lower than at present, would still be well above that of the greater part of the world. [...] there would be '''no hope of providing anything approaching peacetime standards of medical care''' [...] Research should be carried forward into methods of decontaminating water [even today there are no practical ones] [...] Plans should be made for the emergency distribution of limited supplies of drinking water pending the restoration of mains supplies [...] Plans should be prepared to enable the police and the courts to operate quickly and effectively under the conditions foreseen [...] In some parts of the country, particularly if several bombs fell in the same area, there '''might be complete chaos for a time and civil control would collapse'''. In such circumstances the '''local military commander would have to be prepared to take over''' from the civil authority responsibility for the maintenance of law and order and for the administration of Government. He would, if called upon, exercise his existing common-law powers to '''take whatever steps, however drastic, he considered necessary to restore order'''. [...] The '''ordinary machinery of the courts and prisons could not operate'''. Plans were made during the last war for '''"war zone courts" to function in areas which were involved in military operations'''. These plans should now be examined to see if a simple scheme could be worked out for the prompt dismissal of criminal cases." [[/note]] The film reflects this fairly accurate assessment of the UK's likely situation with what the uninformed might call a hopeless and pessimistic outset - ending with a medieval world where agriculture predominates, starvation is ever-present, modern medicine doesn't exist, martial law prevails, capital punishment is routine, children are undereducated savages, the ozone layer is gone, and Survival Of The Fittest is the only way to get by.
31st Aug '15 3:40:25 PM KamsleyKlan
Is there an issue? Send a Message
[[caption-width-right:340: A woman, who has just survived a nuclear bomb, holding her child, [[InfantImmortality who hasn't]].]]
to:
[[caption-width-right:340: A woman, who has just survived a nuclear bomb, holding her child, [[InfantImmortality who hasn't]].]] who]] [[SubvertedTrope hasn't.]]]]
27th Aug '15 6:41:36 PM IshiMatsu615
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* VomitIndiscretionShot: we see Jimmy's father puking into a rag, and Ruth's dad puking in a toilet. One of them is panicking, the other has radiation sickness: take a guess.
to:
* VomitIndiscretionShot: we We see Jimmy's father puking into a rag, and Ruth's dad puking in a toilet. One of them is panicking, the other has radiation sickness: take a guess.
15th Jul '15 6:10:34 AM RatherRandomRachel
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* {{Blooper}}: Despite having been born after the attacks and having spent her whole life in the primitive postwar "society," Ruth's daughter Jane has a tooth filling and pierced ears for ladies earrings. It's nice to know that, even in a post-nuclear apocolypse world, no girl or woman goes out without some sort of jewelry adorning them.
to:
* {{Blooper}}: Despite having been born after {{Bathos}}: One particular scene during the attacks attack has Jimmy's father realising what's happening, all while on the lavatory, meaning he has to pull his trousers up and having spent her whole life in the primitive postwar "society," Ruth's daughter Jane has a tooth filling and pierced ears for ladies earrings. It's nice get ready. This is done very deliberately to know that, even in provide a post-nuclear apocolypse world, no girl or woman moment's relief while everything goes out without some sort of jewelry adorning them.to pieces.

* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: {{Averted}} very soundly.

* NightmareFuel: After "ATTACK WARNING RED", the rest of the film is this.
25th Jun '15 7:12:58 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Link rot.
''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MCbTvoNrAg Threads]]'', a 1984 docudrama produced by Creator/TheBBC, is the United Kingdom's answer to America's ''Film/TheDayAfter'' (which came a year earlier). Britain has quite the history of post-apocalyptic fiction on its DVD and book shelves, and ''Threads'' is amongst the most disturbing examples.
to:
''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MCbTvoNrAg Threads]]'', ''Threads'', a 1984 docudrama produced by Creator/TheBBC, is the United Kingdom's answer to America's ''Film/TheDayAfter'' (which came a year earlier). Britain has quite the history of post-apocalyptic fiction on its DVD and book shelves, and ''Threads'' is amongst the most disturbing examples.
This list shows the last 10 events of 99. Show all.