History Film / TheShopAroundTheCorner

27th Jan '18 4:37:38 PM nombretomado
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Remade in 1949 as ''In The Good Old Summertime'', a {{Musical}} version starring Creator/JudyGarland and set in Chicago in TheGayNineties. Adapted as TheMusical ''Theatre/SheLovesMe'' on Broadway in 1963. Remade again in 1998 as ''Film/YouveGotMail'' with Creator/TomHanks and MegRyan, with that newfangled technology like ''email'' and ''instant messaging''.

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Remade in 1949 as ''In The Good Old Summertime'', a {{Musical}} version starring Creator/JudyGarland and set in Chicago in TheGayNineties. Adapted as TheMusical ''Theatre/SheLovesMe'' on Broadway in 1963. Remade again in 1998 as ''Film/YouveGotMail'' with Creator/TomHanks and MegRyan, Creator/MegRyan, with that newfangled technology like ''email'' and ''instant messaging''.
8th Jan '18 11:59:37 AM jamespolk
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Added DiffLines:

* PenPals: Alfred and Klara fall in love through anonymous pen pal letters.
30th Dec '17 7:03:39 PM benda
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* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, Matuschek, Kralik and Novak are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, at the time popular among upper classes of Budapest and something of lingua franca for the region) with the other staff and the customers. [[/note]]

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* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, Matuschek, Kralik Kralik, Novotny, Kaczek and Novak are seem to be Slovaks (or, or (somewhat less probably, Czechs), probably) Czechs, not Hungarians. (In fact, the only one who has an unambiguously Hungarian name is Ferenc; Pepi's surname is Hungarian, but the diminutive name is of Slavic origin, though it might be just a nickname given to him by the Slavic-speaking staff.) It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, at the time popular among upper classes of Budapest and something of lingua franca for the region) with the other staff and the customers. [[/note]]
30th Dec '17 6:45:46 PM benda
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* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, Matuschek, Kralik and Novak are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, still popular among upper classes of Budapest and something of lingua franca for the region at the time) with the other staff and the customers. [[/note]]

to:

* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, Matuschek, Kralik and Novak are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, still at the time popular among upper classes of Budapest and something of lingua franca for the region at the time) region) with the other staff and the customers. [[/note]]
30th Dec '17 6:43:47 PM benda
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* FoodPorn: When Mr, Matuschek invites errand boy Rudy to share Christmas dinner with him:

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* FoodPorn: When Mr, Mr. Matuschek invites errand boy Rudy to share Christmas dinner with him:



* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, Matuscherk, Kralik and Novak are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, still popular among upper classes of Budapest and something of lingua franca for the region at the time) with the other staff and the customers. [[/note]]

to:

* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, Matuscherk, Matuschek, Kralik and Novak are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, still popular among upper classes of Budapest and something of lingua franca for the region at the time) with the other staff and the customers. [[/note]]
30th Dec '17 6:43:15 PM benda
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* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, almost all of the people in the shop are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, still popular among upper classes of Budapest at the time) with their customers.[[/note]]

to:

* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, almost all of the people in the shop Matuscherk, Kralik and Novak are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, still popular among upper classes of Budapest and something of lingua franca for the region at the time) with their customers.the other staff and the customers. [[/note]]
30th Dec '17 6:36:03 PM benda
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* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, almost all of the people in the shop are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, still popular among upper middle classes of Budapest at the time) with their customers.[[/note]]

to:

* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, almost all of the people in the shop are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, still popular among upper middle classes of Budapest at the time) with their customers.[[/note]]
30th Dec '17 6:28:48 PM benda
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* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all.

to:

* TranslationConvention: They live in Hungary, after all. [[note]]What language they were meant to actually speak is a trickier question than it may look at a first glance. Judging by their surnames, almost all of the people in the shop are Slovaks (or, less probably, Czechs), not Hungarians. It's possible that they spoke Slovak or Czech between themselves, but Hungarian (or even German, still popular among upper middle classes of Budapest at the time) with their customers.[[/note]]
24th Dec '17 8:34:21 AM jamespolk
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A classic 1940 RomanticComedy from legendary director Creator/ErnstLubitsch, starring Stewart and Margaret Sullavan as bickering department store co-workers who are also ([[ObliviousToLove unbeknownst to them]]) pen pals in love. Set in Budapest, Hungary, since it was based on the play ''Parfumerie'' by Hungarian author Miklós László.

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A classic 1940 RomanticComedy from legendary director Creator/ErnstLubitsch, starring Stewart and Margaret Sullavan as bickering department store co-workers in a leather goods store who are also ([[ObliviousToLove unbeknownst to them]]) pen pals in love. Set in Budapest, Hungary, since it was based on the play ''Parfumerie'' by Hungarian author Miklós László.
19th Dec '17 5:56:34 PM Lyner
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Added DiffLines:

* AcquaintedInRealLife: A key example of this trope. The two leads are courting one another anonymously as pen pals while competing and fighting in real life, until one day the secret is revealed.
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