History Film / ThePrisonerOfZenda

4th May '17 2:34:05 PM Gregzilla
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* ReliableTraitor
3rd Apr '17 10:46:41 AM Kitchen90
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The most famous, however, is the 1937 David O. Selznick production directed by John Cromwell. The film stars Creator/RonaldColman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and Creator/DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by Music/AlfredNewman.

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The most famous, however, is the 1937 David O. Selznick production directed by John Cromwell. The film stars Creator/RonaldColman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Creator/DouglasFairbanksJr, as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and Creator/DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by Music/AlfredNewman.
4th Feb '17 8:44:48 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* PlayingAgainstType: Douglas Fairbanks Jr., as a ''villain?'' That's playing against ''two generations'' of type.
4th Feb '17 8:41:57 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* ActingForTwo: Ronald Colman in the lead role. This was one of Ron's specialties; he'd been playing dual roles of one sort or another since his silent film days.
23rd Jan '17 5:38:10 PM jamespolk
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* SarcasticClap: Ramon Novarro's Rupert has some of the same droll humor that Fairbanks brought to the 1937 version. In this one he gives a little sarcastic clap after Antoinette slaps him.

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* SarcasticClap: SarcasticClapping: Ramon Novarro's Rupert has some of the same droll humor that Fairbanks brought to the 1937 version. In this one he gives a little sarcastic clap after Antoinette slaps him.
23rd Jan '17 5:37:00 PM jamespolk
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''The Prisoner of Zenda'' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the novel (1913, 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, in a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made.

The film stars Creator/RonaldColman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by Music/AlfredNewman.

MetroGoldwynMayer remade the film in 1952, directed by Richard Thorpe, with Stewart Granger, Creator/DeborahKerr, and James Mason in the Colman, Carroll, and Fairbanks roles. The film was more or less a Technicolor carbon copy of the 1937 film, reusing the same script, score, and even camera angles. It was not considered a great success, however. Creator/PeterSellers remade the movie as a comedy ([[SubvertedTrope subverting]] and [[InvertedTrope inverting]] many of the tropes associated with this film) in 1979, also less than successfully.

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''The Prisoner of Zenda'' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] There have been many film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the Anthony Hope novel (1913, ''Literature/ThePrisonerOfZenda''. There were silent versions in 1913 and 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, another silent version in 1922 starring Lewis Stone as Rudolf/Rudolph and Ramon Novarro as Rupert, a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, 1952 version with Stewart Granger, Creator/JamesMason, and Creator/DeborahKerr, a 1979 version starring Creator/PeterSellers in one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made.his last roles, and a TV movie version in 1984.

The most famous, however, is the 1937 David O. Selznick production directed by John Cromwell. The film stars Creator/RonaldColman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven Creator/DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by Music/AlfredNewman.

MetroGoldwynMayer remade the film in 1952, directed by Richard Thorpe, with Stewart Granger, Creator/DeborahKerr, and James Mason in the Colman, Carroll, and Fairbanks roles. The film was more or less a Technicolor carbon copy of the 1937 film, reusing the same script, score, and even camera angles. It was not considered a great success, however. Creator/PeterSellers remade the movie as a comedy ([[SubvertedTrope subverting]] and [[InvertedTrope inverting]] many of the tropes associated with this film) in 1979, also less than successfully.
Music/AlfredNewman.
23rd Jan '17 5:29:52 PM jamespolk
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Added DiffLines:

* SarcasticClap: Ramon Novarro's Rupert has some of the same droll humor that Fairbanks brought to the 1937 version. In this one he gives a little sarcastic clap after Antoinette slaps him.
23rd Jan '17 5:20:54 PM jamespolk
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* SuccessionCrisis

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* SuccessionCrisisSuccessionCrisis: Rudolph is in line to the throne but his younger and probably more competent brother Michael lusts for power.


Added DiffLines:

* LittlePeopleAreSurreal: A creepy dwarf assassin is sent to kill Rassendyl but is interrupted JustInTime.
23rd Jan '17 10:18:19 AM jamespolk
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* VillainExitStageLeft: Hentzau's HighDiveEscape into the moat at the end of the climactic sword duel may just be the most famous exit in the history of cinema
* YouFightLikeACow: Rassendyll and Hentzau have a classic exchange of repartee, both verbal and metallic, in the final SwordFight.

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* VillainExitStageLeft: Hentzau's HighDiveEscape into the moat at the end of the climactic sword duel may just be the most famous exit in the history of cinema
* YouFightLikeACow: Rassendyll and Hentzau have a classic exchange of repartee, both verbal and metallic, in the final SwordFight.
cinema.


Added DiffLines:

* TheXOfY
* YouFightLikeACow: Rassendyll and Hentzau have a classic exchange of repartee, both verbal and metallic, in the final SwordFight.
21st Jan '17 10:13:32 PM jamespolk
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* GoodHairEvilHair: Ramon Novarro as Rupert sports both an evil pointy Van Dyke and a pencil mustache.

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* GoodHairEvilHair: Ramon Novarro as Rupert sports both an evil pointy Van Dyke and a pencil mustache.mustache.
* ImagineSpot: Michael imagines himself as King, with crown and scepter and all that stuff, until Rudolf arrives impersonating Rudolph and ruins it.
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