History Film / ThePrisonerOfZenda

13th Jul '16 4:59:50 AM Morgenthaler
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* RedHeadedHero: Played straight in the book but averted (probably, though it's hard to tell in black and white) here as the hero/king are both played by the brown-haired Ronald Colman.
26th May '16 7:14:15 AM Mdumas43073
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''The Prisoner of Zenda'' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the novel (1913, 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, in a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made. The film stars Creator/RonaldColman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by Music/AlfredNewman.

to:

''The Prisoner of Zenda'' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the novel (1913, 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, in a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made.

The film stars Creator/RonaldColman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by Music/AlfredNewman.
26th May '16 7:13:39 AM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:247:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/FilmThePrisonerOfZenda.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:247:Toward the close of the last century, when History still wore a Rose, and Politics had not yet outgrown the waltz...]]

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[[quoteright:247:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/FilmThePrisonerOfZenda.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:247:Toward
org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_prisoner_of_zenda_combined_cast_11.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:300:Toward
the close of the last century, when History still wore a Rose, and Politics had not yet outgrown the waltz...]]
15th Feb '16 11:56:53 AM jamespolk
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''The Prisoner of Zenda'' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the novel (1913, 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, in a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made. The film stars Ronald Colman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by Music/AlfredNewman.

to:

''The Prisoner of Zenda'' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the novel (1913, 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, in a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made. The film stars Ronald Colman Creator/RonaldColman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by Music/AlfredNewman.
21st Dec '15 8:32:09 PM Adept
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* NotableOriginalMusic: AlfredNewman's lush romantic score, which was mined for use in other films and repeated entire for the 1952 remake. Notable for its use of {{Leitmotif}}.

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* NotableOriginalMusic: AlfredNewman's Alfred Newman's lush romantic score, which was mined for use in other films and repeated entire for the 1952 remake. Notable for its use of {{Leitmotif}}.



* PublicDomainSoundtrack: In the midst of the original score by AlfredNewman, the coronation scene is accompanied by an anthem to the tune of "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fF9jGNvbWbM See, the Conqu'ring Hero Comes]]" from Händel's ''Judas Maccabaeus''. This was probably inspired by the use of Händel anthems, such as ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPkzt9vklAw Zadok the Priest]]" at British coronations.

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* PublicDomainSoundtrack: In the midst of the original score by AlfredNewman, Alfred Newman, the coronation scene is accompanied by an anthem to the tune of "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fF9jGNvbWbM See, the Conqu'ring Hero Comes]]" from Händel's ''Judas Maccabaeus''. This was probably inspired by the use of Händel anthems, such as ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPkzt9vklAw Zadok the Priest]]" at British coronations.
21st Dec '15 8:31:23 PM Adept
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''The Prisoner of Zenda'' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the novel (1913, 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, in a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made. The film stars Ronald Colman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by AlfredNewman.

to:

''The Prisoner of Zenda'' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the novel (1913, 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, in a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made. The film stars Ronald Colman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by AlfredNewman.
Music/AlfredNewman.
23rd Nov '15 12:44:09 PM JustKnown
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* TheWrongfulHeirToTheThrone: A double dose as the legitimate ruler, Rudolf, is a drunken boor who is unpopular with the people while TheUsurper, Black Michael, isn't the most charming or popular guy either, but at least he's competent and respected. But the impostor, Rudolf Rassendyl, puts them both to shame and would make a better king then either of them, prompting young von Tarlenheim's "heaven doesn't always make the right men kings" quote.

to:

* TheWrongfulHeirToTheThrone: A double dose as the legitimate ruler, Rudolf, is a drunken boor who is unpopular with the people while and TheUsurper, Black Michael, while competent, isn't the most charming or popular guy either, but at least he's competent and respected. But the either. The impostor, Rudolf Rassendyl, puts them both to shame and would make a better king then either of them, prompting young von Tarlenheim's "heaven doesn't always make the right men kings" quote.
23rd Nov '15 12:32:13 PM JustKnown
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* FakeKing

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* FakeKingFakeKing: Rassendyl, in a gambit which boxes in Black Michael since he can hardly admit he kidnapped the real king.



PsychopathicManchild: Count Rupert, though he's not sadistic so much as completely [[TheUnfettered unfettered]], like a twelve year old boy with an endless supply of bullfrogs and firecrackers.

to:

* PsychopathicManchild: Count Rupert, though he's not sadistic so much as completely [[TheUnfettered unfettered]], like a twelve year old boy with an endless supply of bullfrogs and firecrackers.



* WrongfulHeirToTheThrone: A double dose as the legitimate ruler, Rudolf, is a drunken boor who is unpopular with the people while TheUsurper, Black Michael, isn't the most charming or popular guy either, but at least he's competent and respected. But the impostor, Rudolf Rassendyl, puts them both to shame and would make a better king then either of them, prompting young von Tarlenheim's "heaven doesn't always make the right men kings" quote.

to:

* WrongfulHeirToTheThrone: TheWrongfulHeirToTheThrone: A double dose as the legitimate ruler, Rudolf, is a drunken boor who is unpopular with the people while TheUsurper, Black Michael, isn't the most charming or popular guy either, but at least he's competent and respected. But the impostor, Rudolf Rassendyl, puts them both to shame and would make a better king then either of them, prompting young von Tarlenheim's "heaven doesn't always make the right men kings" quote.
23rd Nov '15 12:26:56 PM JustKnown
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Added DiffLines:

PsychopathicManchild: Count Rupert, though he's not sadistic so much as completely [[TheUnfettered unfettered]], like a twelve year old boy with an endless supply of bullfrogs and firecrackers.


Added DiffLines:

* WrongfulHeirToTheThrone: A double dose as the legitimate ruler, Rudolf, is a drunken boor who is unpopular with the people while TheUsurper, Black Michael, isn't the most charming or popular guy either, but at least he's competent and respected. But the impostor, Rudolf Rassendyl, puts them both to shame and would make a better king then either of them, prompting young von Tarlenheim's "heaven doesn't always make the right men kings" quote.
17th Sep '15 2:18:55 PM StFan
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http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/FilmThePrisonerOfZenda.jpg
[[caption-width:247:Toward the close of the last century, when History still wore a Rose, and Politics had not yet outgrown the waltz...]]
'''''The Prisoner Of Zenda''''' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the novel (1913, 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, in a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made. The film stars Ronald Colman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by AlfredNewman.

to:

http://static.[[quoteright:247:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/FilmThePrisonerOfZenda.jpg
[[caption-width:247:Toward
jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:247:Toward
the close of the last century, when History still wore a Rose, and Politics had not yet outgrown the waltz...]]
'''''The
]]

''The
Prisoner Of Zenda''''' of Zenda'' is the 1937 David O. Selznick [[{{Swashbuckler}} Swashbuckling]] film adaptation of the classic {{Adventure}} [[ThePrisonerOfZenda novel]] by Anthony Hope. Of the numerous adaptations of the novel (1913, 1915, 1922, 1952, 1979, and, in a TV version, 1984), this version, directed by John Cromwell, is generally considered the best, and, indeed, one of the greatest swashbucklers ever made. The film stars Ronald Colman in the dual role of Rudolf Rassendyll, English gentleman, and Rudolph V, the ne'er-do-well king (the name is spelled both ways in the film); and co-stars Madeleine Carroll, as the lovely and lively Princess Flavia, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as the [[AffablyEvil wicked but engaging]] Count Rupert of Hentzau. Raymond Massey as the saturnine and ambitious Duke Michael, Mary Astor as his beautiful but hapless mistress Antoinette de Mauban, C. Aubrey Smith as the crusty, Macchiavellian Colonel Zapt [''sic''], and DavidNiven (in his first major role) as the faithful though feckless Fritz von Tarlenheim lend sterling support. The sweeping romantic score, supported by use of Wagnerian [[{{Leitmotif}} leitmotives]] is by AlfredNewman.



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