History Film / TheGoodTheBadandTheUgly

23rd Mar '17 2:50:55 PM Dragon101
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** Angel Eyes: Has been hired to get information from a man. He enters his house, gets the information, and accepts money from him (implicitly to kill his own boss). The man then tries to draw on him and he shoots the man dead. His eldest son comes downstairs (armed) and Angel Eyes kills him too. He then goes back to his boss, giving him the information, and then kills him — he took the first victim's money, and he always finishes the job once he's been paid. "Il cattivo," or "The Bad."

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** Angel Eyes: Has been hired to get information from a man. He enters his house, gets the information, and accepts money from him (implicitly to kill his own boss). The man then tries to draw on him and he shoots the man dead. His eldest son comes downstairs (armed) and Angel Eyes kills him too. He then goes back to his boss, giving him the information, and then kills him — he took the first victim's money, and he always finishes the job once he's been paid. [[EvilLaugh He laughs]]. "Il cattivo," or "The Bad."
27th Feb '17 1:33:41 PM Andrewjpet12
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* BorrowedCatchprase: Blondie does this to Tuco. ("There Are Two Kinds of People in the World, my friend...")

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* BorrowedCatchprase: BorrowedCatchphrase: Blondie does this to Tuco. ("There Are Two Kinds of People in the World, my friend...")



* ChromosoneCasting: Maria, a prostitute appearing in a single scene, is the most important female character and the only one given a name. Four women are seen on screen during the three-hour movie (with something like eight minutes of screen time between them), and only one of them besides Maria has any dialogue at all.

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* ChromosoneCasting: ChromosomeCasting: Maria, a prostitute appearing in a single scene, is the most important female character and the only one given a name. Four women are seen on screen during the three-hour movie (with something like eight minutes of screen time between them), and only one of them besides Maria has any dialogue at all.



* TheCoatsComeOff: It happens a few minutes before the final confrontation, but Blondie removes his longcoat to place it over a dying man, and instead dons the iconic poncho.

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* TheCoatsComeOff: TheCoatsAreOff: It happens a few minutes before the final confrontation, but Blondie removes his longcoat to place it over a dying man, and instead dons the iconic poncho.



* GanstaStyle: In an early example, Tuco finishes off a baddie using this technique, during the famous "When you have to shoot, ''shoot'', don't talk!" scene.

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* GanstaStyle: GangstaStyle: In an early example, Tuco finishes off a baddie using this technique, during the famous "When you have to shoot, ''shoot'', don't talk!" scene.



* ScariltyCompetentTracker: In an ordinary movie, either Angel Eyes or Blondie would be one. But here, everyone can track anyone like this.

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* ScariltyCompetentTracker: ScarilyCompetentTracker: In an ordinary movie, either Angel Eyes or Blondie would be one. But here, everyone can track anyone like this.



* ThirstyVillain: Exploited by Blondie when he abandons Tuco in the desert. He manages to survive the ordeal and then finds Blondie to give him ATasteOfTheirOwnMedicine.
23rd Feb '17 8:16:49 AM CumbersomeTercel
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* {{Bandito}}: Tuco Benedicto Pacifico Juan Maria Ramirez

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* {{Bandito}}: Tuco Benedicto Pacifico Juan Maria RamirezRamirez redefined the Bandito character as a sympathetic figure rather than a merely malevolent one, and [[FountainOfExpies set the trend for the creation of many more characters like him]].



* TheDreaded: Angel Eyes.

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* TheDreaded: Angel Eyes. Come on, how could you ''not'' be scared of him?



* DumbMuscle: Wallace.

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* DumbMuscle: Wallace. Letting a scheming, conniving bandit out of his sight for even a minute onboard a moving train probably wasn't a good idea. Even though said bandit tricked him by telling him he had to use the bathroom.



* FingerlessGloves: Tuco wears the hobo-style.

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* FingerlessGloves: Tuco wears the hobo-style. This is only in his Bill Carson disguise; the other times he wears enormous silver rings on his left hand.



* GirlyRun: Tuco has one.

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* GirlyRun: Tuco has one.tends to skip and bound with his upper arms close to his chest, hands slightly out from his sides. This "Wallach frolic" is part of what makes him TheComicallySerious.



* GoldTooth: Tuco has a prominent silver tooth.

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* GoldTooth: Tuco has a prominent silver tooth.tooth on the right side of his top jaw.



* LaughablyEvil: Tuco before CharacterDevelopment.

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* LaughablyEvil: Tuco before CharacterDevelopment. is far from a good guy, and he's absolutely hilarious. It's no coincidence that the funniest movie of the Franchise/DollarsTrilogy is the only one to have a VillainProtagonist.



* ManlyTears: Tuco sheds quiet, restrained ones after learning about the deaths of his parents.



* UnorthodoxHolstering: Tuco keeps his pistol dangling around his neck with a piece of rope. [[EnforcedTrope Apparently, this was because Eli Wallach kept looking down to check whenever he wore a pistol belt]].



* VillainousCheekbones: Angel Eyes

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* VillainousCheekbones: Angel EyesEyes. Hell, Lee Van Cleef's infamous cheekbones provide one of the page's images.
6th Feb '17 1:01:28 PM CumbersomeTercel
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* TheCoatsComeOff: It happens a few minutes before the final confrontation, but Blondie removes his longcoat to place it over a dying man, and instead dons the iconic poncho.



* TheDutifulSon: Tuco chastises his brother for staying home and taking the easy road by becoming a priest, whereas Tuco chose what he felt was the only other profession available to them: a bandit. (Tuco might have gone easier on his brother had the latter not had such a disapproving, condescending attitude to him and his activities.)
** This scene is more of a reversal of the usual trope: Pablo left home to be a priest, leaving Tuco behind to take care of their parents. Unable to find legitimate work, Tuco became a bandit out of necessity. Or at least, that's his version.



* TheGuardsMustBeCrazy: Wallace lets Tuco go relieve himself. BIG mistake.



* TheNounAndTheNoun



* SlidingScaleOfGenderInequality: A prostitute appearing in a single scene is the most important female character and the only one given a name. Every last woman in the film besides her is someone's wife, and all their appearances are within the first hour of the nearly 3-hour film. Rape, incidentally, is on Tuco's LongList of prior offenses, which is entirely PlayedForLaughs (and is one of the crimes he may or may not have made up, anyway). In any case, it is mentioned offhand that the bandido ReallyGetsAround and has been married at least once.



* TheSouthpaw: A bounty hunter who lost his right arm to Tuco at the beginning of the film learns to shoot with his left, which, after catching up to Tuco, he squanders by bragging about it instead of just killing him.



* StatingTheSimpleSolution: Lampshaded: "If you're gonna shoot, shoot, don't talk!"
* StayWithMeUntilIDie: Not a word is spoken by either character, but Blondie encounters a mortally wounded young soldier and, knowing the kid won't make it, Blondie covers him with a makeshift blanket (his duster) and offers the dying boy one last smoke before death takes him.
* StealthHiBye: What characters "see" is often dictated by the edges of the frame rather than anything realistic: for instance, at one point Tuco sneaks up on Blondie in an entirely flat landscape, getting close enough to hold a gun to his head before he notices.
* StealthSequel: The film actually takes place before the first two films.
* SuperWindowJump: Tuco's introduction consists of him crashing through a window to get outside after the building he's hiding in gets stormed by his enemies. In this case, he couldn't use the door because said enemies were blocking it.
* SupportingProtagonist: Clint Eastwood may have got top billing, but this really Tuco's story. In fact, he gets the most screentime of the main characters.
* SympatheticPOV: This is a factor in what makes Tuco at least as sympathetic as Blondie. Tuco has done some pretty horrible things off-screen, but of the three protagonists, he's the one who's given the most on-screen "human" moments and displays the broadest emotional range. Blondie is an enigma who gets a few PetTheDog moments in the last third of the film, and Angel Eyes is a stone-cold killer except for a scene in the director's cut which plays him sympathetically as well.



* TalkingToTheDead: When Tuco catches up with Blondie, he finds Blondie running the same bounty racket with another bandit. Blondie is forced to watch his new partner die, to which he mutters "Sorry, Shorty."



* ThemeMusicPowerUp: Just before the 'two against five' sequence, a burst of the theme music plays as Blondie asks Tuco "Were you going to die alone?" and joins him to fight Angel-Eyes' men.



* ThirstyVillain: Exploited by Blondie when he abandons Tuco in the desert. He manages to survive the ordeal and then finds Blondie to give him ATasteOfTheirOwnMedicine.



* TrashTheSet: The bridge in the battle scene was built with the intent of it being blown up in the climax, so Leone knew they had to do it in one take. Thanks to meticulous planning, the filming went beautifully, providing one of the most climactic scenes in the film.



* VocalEvolution: In the extended cut, which was ReCut some thirty years after it was originally released. Since sync-sound was not recorded during filming (the various actors hailed from different countries and they all spoke in their native languages), the new scenes were never dubbed during the original cut's post production process, the original actors were brought back to dub the new lines. Problem was... they're all thirty years older the second time around (Eli Wallach was pushing on 90 when he dubbed his lines, and therefore his voice was even raspier than it was some forty years ago), and it shows.
* WantedPoster: Tuco has one emblazoned with a humorously anachronistic high-res photograph of the outlaw.



* WouldHitAGirl: In order to show how evil The Bad is, Angel Eyes relentlessly beats up a girl towards the beginning of the film. However, according to an interview with Creator/LeeVanCleef, [[MeanCharacterNiceActor he refused to actually hit her,]] so they had to use his stunt man for that scene.
* WouldHurtAChild: Angel Eyes killing Stevens' son. To be fair, the boy had a rifle.


Added DiffLines:

* WouldHitAGirl: In order to show how evil The Bad is, Angel Eyes relentlessly beats up a girl towards the beginning of the film. However, according to an interview with Creator/LeeVanCleef, [[MeanCharacterNiceActor he refused to actually hit her,]] so they had to use his stunt man for that scene.
* WouldHurtAChild: Angel Eyes killing Stevens' son. To be fair, the boy had a rifle.
* YouAreFat: Tuco taunts Corporal Wallace, an overweight - and rather sadistic - TortureTechnician, by saying he likes fat people, because when he knocks them down it's funny seeing them try to get up.
6th Feb '17 11:48:24 AM CumbersomeTercel
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* ActionFilmQuietDramaScene: In particular for our two glorious rascals, Tuco's discussion with his brother who is a monk, which escalates into a brief fight, and Blondie's comforting of a dying soldier, which gives them necessary depth to their characters.



* AllThereInTheScript: The Bad is referred by other characters as "Angel Eyes", but his real name is Sentenza (which is used instead of Angel Eyes in the Italian dub).



* AnimatedCreditsOpening: The credits sequence has a mix of animation and still photos with various filters applied to make them look somewhat hand-drawn.



* BathtubScene: Fifty year old [[BigBeautifulMan Tuco]] had this... which doubles with NakedPeopleAreFunny when a vengeful bounty hunter (that Tuco had shot in the hand earlier) bursts in on him and starts yapping at him about his victory. He delivers a long speech about how he tracked Tuco down, and how he had lots of time to learn to shoot with his left hand... which is cut off when Tuco shoots him with a gun hidden under the bathtub bubbles.
-->'''Tuco:''' When you gotta shoot, shoot, don't talk.



* BestServedCold: Played for laughs when a one-armed man trains himself for months to shoot left-handed and get revenge against Tuco, who caused his mutilation. When he finally tracks him down, he goes on to give him the obligatory monologue, until an unimpressed Tuco kills him with his concealed pistol, annoyingly quipping "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk".



* BoisterousBruiser: Tuco is energetic and quite temperamental. He also has the friendly, welcoming demeanor to go with it
* BoleroEffect: "The Ecstasy of Gold".



* BountyHunter: Blondie; Angel Eyes



* BootstrappedTheme: The theme is arguably one of the most well known Western themes, and is the subject of a great many shout outs in other media. However, it is frequently used to parody, or evoke, the tension of the climactic final shootout scene, which has its own theme, which doesn't use the "wah wah wah" riff.
* BorrowedCatchprase: Blondie does this to Tuco. ("There Are Two Kinds of People in the World, my friend...")
* BossSubtitles: The three title characters are introduced by this as well as a freeze frame and {{Leitmotif}}.
* BountyHunter: Blondie engages in a con involving turning in Tuco for the bounty on his head, freeing him from the noose by shooting off the rope, and then splitting the take between them. Angel Eyes is a much darker version. His very first scene involves his target trying to pay him to kill his employer by offering more than what he was paid. Angel Eyes takes the money but simply tells him "When they pay me, I always see the job through" and shoots him. In the very next scene, he collects his money from his employer and says the exact same line before brutally murdering him.



* {{Brownface}}: The Jewish-American Eli Wallach plays a Mexican bandit. [[Film/TheMagnificentSeven Again]].
* CacophonyCoverUp:
** Three men are sneaking up to Blondie's room as a Confederate army column marches by. Unfortunately the column comes to an abrupt halt just as a spur jingles, alerting Blondie.
** In the prisoner of war camp run by Angel Eyes, he has a band of captured Confederate soldiers play to cover the sound of his men torturing Tuco.



* CaptainSmoothAndSergeantRough: Blondie and Tuco are captured by Union soldiers and brought to a harsh prison camp (they were both wearing Confederate uniforms at the time and Tuco had foolishly shouted some pro-Confederate remarks just before being captured). There are three officers shown to be running the camp, and the two most prominently shown are the extremely brutal Corporal Wallace and Angel Eyes. The commandant is actually a decent guy who tries to get the two brutal officers to treat the prisoners fairly. Unfortunately, he's dying from an infected wound, and unable to stop the two officers from taking prisoners inside a building just so they can beat the crap out of them.
* CaptivityHarmonica: Used when Blondie and Tuco get marched to the Union prison camp.
* CavalryOfficer: Blondie and Tuco encounter a Confederate cavalry officer, who turns out to be a Union cavalry officer after brushing the gray dust off his uniform. He is not amused.
* CentralTheme: Even war won't stop the greedy.
* ChainedHeat: Subverted. Tuco is captured by Union forces and transported by train, with a Union soldier handcuffed to him as a guard. Using his bathroom break as a pretense to get near the door, he simply jumps out of the moving train and takes the guard with him. When they land Tuco bashes the man's head in against a rock, then waits with the chain held across the rail for the next train to cut it.



* ChromosoneCasting: Maria, a prostitute appearing in a single scene, is the most important female character and the only one given a name. Four women are seen on screen during the three-hour movie (with something like eight minutes of screen time between them), and only one of them besides Maria has any dialogue at all.



* ConsummateProfessional: Angel Eyes. While he's a vicious, cold-blooded killer, he does not fail to complete jobs when he's paid. In his first scene, he blows a man away after the man unsuccessfully tries to offer double what Angel Eyes's employer paid... and then pockets the money offered, goes back to his employer, and kills him. After all, he'd taken the money.



* CruelMercy: At first it seems like Blondie is going to ride away and leave Tuco to hang himself when he eventually falls as retribution for double-crossing him. At the last minute, however, he turns, and fires his rifle, severing the rope, saying "Just like old times." Tuco is alive and has his share of the gold, but with no horse and in the middle of the desert, getting back to civilization won't be easy. (Of course, he did manage it when Blondie abandoned him at the beginning of the movie.)



* DashingHispanic: Tuco. He's the ugly, and not just because of his looks. "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk."
* DeadlyBath: Tuco is ambushed while taking a bubble-bath by a one-armed man who he wronged in the past. While his left hand isn't his best, he had plenty of time to take aim at Tuco while he's naked and helpless in the bathtub. Then subverted when Tuco shoots him with his gun hidden under the bubbles.



* DeconstructorFleet: For TheWestern.

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* DeconstructorFleet: For TheWestern.The film deconstructs not only the morality of Westerns, but the dramatic structure they're built on, stripping it down to the bare minimum.



* DesignStudentsOrgasm: The title sequence.



* DesignStudentsOrgasm: The title sequence.

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* DesignStudentsOrgasm: {{Deuteragonist}}: Tuco s the protagonist, Blondie is the deuteragonist and Angel Eyes is the tritagonist.
* DigYourOwnGrave: A different take occurs. A thief escorted by Union soldiers is carrying a coffin on his back.
The title sequence.soldiers put him against a wall and shoot him, then place him in the coffin.



* TheDreaded: Angel Eyes.



* DropTheCow: Dramatic example (really!): Sergio Leone felt a scene near the end was too melodramatic, so he released a small dog onto the set without telling Eli Wallach and then left his reaction in the film; of course, it's followed by ten minutes of pure {{Melodrama}}.



* EnterStageWindow: Tuco gets the drop on Blondie this way.
-->''"There are two kinds of spurs, my friend. Those that come in by the door; those that come in by the window."''
* EnvironmentalSymbolism:
** The Graveyard from the infamous showdown scene emphasises the finality of the paths of the three principle characters. Sergio Leone had so brilliantly set up a situation where all three men couldn't possibly leave alive.
** Not to mention it was designed to look like a Roman circus, as if the graves of the dead were watching the three men fight.
** Most of the bits of architecture in the film resemble gallows, a running theme of the film.



* {{Eyedscreen}}: The climax has quick shots of the three main characters' eyes just before the end of their MeleeATrois.



* FailedASpotCheck: As an artistic choice, this happens so much that characters can hardly be said to even ''exist'' if they are not on screen. This is actually the film maker's idea. Characters' fields of view is the same as the audience/camera's. This explains how the villain manages to sneak up on the hero in the middle of a mostly flat area for the film's final confrontation. While off screen, the hero and the audience cannot see them.
* {{Fainting}}: Blondie passes out after Tuco marches him through a blisteringly hot desert (and, more importantly, after he learns the location of $200,000 in gold from a dying Confederate soldier).
* FamousLastWords: "NO! ANGEL EYES!" Baker, after Angel Eyes reveals that the man Baker had him kill payed him to kill Baker.



* FinalSpeech:
** The final words of Bill Carson provide Tuco with the cemetery's location and Blondie with the name on the tombstone (each individually) where $200,000 is buried. This forces the two to work together and sets up the rest of the movie.
** The film in general contains a handful of final speeches of otherwise unimportant soldiers of the American Civil War. [[note]]The films plot of buried treasure runs parralel to the civil war, and the meaningless deaths of young soldiers, imprisonment in a POW camp, showdown in a militairy cemetary and other plot points symbolise death in all its forms[[/note]] Being a Western, the speeches are often very short and contain more body language than words.



* FreudianTrio: Blondie's the Ego, Tuco the Id, and Angel Eyes the Superego.

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* FreudianTrio: Blondie's the Ego, ForeignCussWord: Tuco shouts two similar Spanish curses. First, when being carried tied-up into town, he shouts out "''¡Hijo de puta te que parió!''" ("Son of the Id, bitch who whelped you!", though grammatically incorrect). Then, when Blondie abandons Tuco in the desert, Tuco yells the big one: "''¡Hijo de una gran puta!''" ("You son of a big whore!").
* FreudianTrio:
** Ego: Blondie -- Objective, calm, focused on the money but occasionally stops to PetTheDog
** Id: Tuco Ramirez -- Hyperactive, [[AttentionDeficitOohShiny distractible]], excitable, [[HairTriggerTemper loses his temper fast]]
and gets it back just as quick
** Superego:
Angel Eyes -- [[LackOfEmpathy Utterly cold]], [[OnlyInItForTheMoney cares only about the Superego.money]], doesn't give a damn about other people's lives



* GanstaStyle: In an early example, Tuco finishes off a baddie using this technique, during the famous "When you have to shoot, ''shoot'', don't talk!" scene.



* GeorgeLucasAlteredVersion: The original English-language version was significantly edited down from the Italian version before the dub was recorded, and the removed scenes went un-translated for decades. It wasn't until 2002 that a special edition was created which returned the 14 minutes of missing footage, with newly-recorded English dialogue. However, as Lee Van Cleef had passed away, his character's lines had to be performed by Simon Prescott, and it's quite easy to tell that his voice isn't quite a match for Van Cleef's. Eli Wallach was able to return to record his character's lines, but his voice was noticeably older. Additionally, the entire movie's soundtrack was completely remixed and partially re-recorded, with several sound effects being noticeably altered, especially the gunshots. The DVD and Blu-ray also include a second audio track featuring the Italian dialogue and the original sound mix.
* GiantMook: Wallace.
* GirlyRun: Tuco has one.



* GoldTooth: Tuco has a prominent silver tooth.
* GoodCostumeSwitch: Blondie borders on ChaoticEvil for most of the movie, but after he cements his goodness by selflessly comforting a dying soldier rather than choosing to pursue the gold, he changes to the poncho from the first two movies in which he's more caring and heroic.
* GoodEyesEvilEyes:
** Everybody is squinting, all the time -- but Creator/LeeVanCleef squints harder than anybody else. He is, of course, the Bad.
** Van Cleef is supposed to have said, "Being born with a pair of beady eyes was the best thing that ever happened to me."
** Though to complicate matters, Tuco's look ranges from the determined squint through to the wide eyed amazement, and he is by no means a saint.
* GoodIsImpotent: Done very subtly. Most of the characters and plot are stuck firmly into a BlackAndGrayMorality setting. The few truly good characters such as the priests or the Union Commandant are either helpless to change things or relegated to standing on the sidelines while the Black and Gray characters run things.
* GoodSmokingEvilSmoking: Doubly inverted: Angel Eyes smokes a pipe, but this makes him a Distinguished Badass rather than a Distinguished Gentleman. Blondie smokes cigarillos, but is the Good (relatively, within the spectrum of GreyAndGreyMorality).
* {{Greed}}: Greed is the motivating factor in the lives of all three protagonists. They want the gold, and they don't care what they have to do to get it. Angel Eyes is by far the worst about it. He's basically this vice in a coat and a cowboy hat.
* GrowlingGut: Tuco's stomach growls when Angel Eyes invites him over for lunch.
* GunPorn: The film has some very loving close-up shots of revolvers being disassembled, cleaned, reassembled, with some chill-inducingly satisfying foley.
* GunStripping: Blondie cleans his guns at one point. He has to finish before bandits enter his room. Tuco also does this also when assembling his hybrid pistol from several others.



* HellholePrison: The film has an infamous sequence where Blondie and Tuco are captured by Union soldiers and brought to a particularly nasty camp. What follows soon after is the brutal torture of Tuco by Angel Eyes and another soldier- okay, in this case they want information, but he openly admits that "the talking won't save you" (in other words, he tortured Tuco even further ''after he'd told him everything''). To make matters worse, it's heavily implied that this is a normal occurrence in the camp, [[FridgeHorror and most of the prisoners probably didn't even have information worth torturing them for]]. Fortunately, Blondie gets out of there quickly before anything can happen to him.
** To make it even more depressing, they're actually going entirely against regulations- the commandant actually ''does'' want the prisoners treated fairly, but he's powerless to stop them because he's dying from gangrene.



* HurtingHero: Blondie is forced to cross the desert with no water, while Tuco is brutally beaten.



* IGaveMyWord: Angel Eyes shoots his employer after taking money from his last victim to do so. He always keeps a contract, even with a man he's just killed.
* IKEAWeaponry: Tuco cobbles together his own custom pistol from various revolver parts at a general store, which he then proceeds to rob.



* ImproperlyPlacedFirearms: The film has a handful of guns that don't quite fit its Civil War timeframe. Blondie uses a Winchester 1866 "Yellow Boy" rifle (slightly modified to make it resemble a Henry rifle) and Tuco finds both an 1868 Garland revolver and an 1889 Bodeo when he's robbing the gun store. It's a common misconception that Blondie's revolver, an 1851 Colt Navy converted to fire cartridges, is an anachronism, but such conversions were available as early as 1858.
* InformedAttribute: Tuco nicknames The Man With No Name "Blondie", and interrogates other characters as to his whereabouts by asking for a 'tall blond man'. Angel Eyes goes so far as to gush over Blondie's beautiful blond hair, calling him a 'blond-haired angel'. His hair is light brown. This is particularly bizarre because the part was almost certainly written for Eastwood. The reason is a failed {{Woolseyism}} - the original Italian script had Tuco nickname the Man With No Name "Biondo", which technically means "blond" but can be used to mean someone with fair colouring. The novelization, more closely based on the Italian script, refers to the character as 'Whitey'.



* JackBauerInterrogationTechnique: In a villainous example, Angel Eyes (through a Union soldier sergeant) inflicts this on Tuco to get him to reveal his half of the info on where the gold is after he and Blondie are captured and taken to a prison camp.



* JustifiedCriminal: Tuco describes himself as this, claiming that it was either that or poverty.
* JustTrainWrong: The military train is quite clearly a Spanish steam engine (note the buffers as it pulls into the station) pulling European-style two-axle cars. By the 1860s, bogie cars were well-established in America.



* KindheartedCatLover: Blondie takes time out to stroke a cat while clearing a town of Mooks with Tuco.
* KingmakerScenario: Both Angel Eyes and Tuco know the name of the grave site - Blondie is initially disadvantaged as he only knows the name on the grave itself, but will eventually become the Kingmaker and the other two know this. After Angel Eyes finds out Tuco's half of the secret, the film spends a little time watching the two fighting over who gets Blondie. (He sides with Tuco in the end, but out of choice. No-one gets to tell the Man With No Name what to do.)



* ListOfTransgressions: At each of Tuco's "executions" an official reads off the list of crimes for which he has been convicted. They go on for quite a while.
** Considering how many of the offenses on the list ... even the relatively lower-grade ones ... were capital crimes, how he and Blondie cheat the executioner more than once is an exercise best left to Sergio Leone and the viewer, and in-universe, even Blondie realizes that the scam may not work the third time around and leaves Tuco in the desert after the second time, his only stated reason being that he didn't think Tuco would ever be worth more than three grand.
** The first time we see them pulling this scam, the judge is reading a list of offenses including murder, arson in a state prison, theft of sacred objects, inciting prostitution, armed robbery . . . but he sounds ''really'' indignant as he winds up with [-"... and, contrary to the laws of this state, the condemned is guilty of [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking using MARKED CARDS AND LOADED DICE!]]"-]
** One judge remarks that Tuco "spontaneously confessed" to many of the crimes, implying that he made at least some of them up to drive up his bounty.
* LittleHeroBigWar: The film takes place against the backdrop of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar. The eponymous characters, however, are only involved with it in a tangential sort of way for most of the story.



* LostInTranslation: The Finnish title ''is Hyvät, pahat ja rumat'' (implying that the movie isn't so much about three persons, one of whom is considered good, the second bad and the last ugly, but several of each.)
* LovableRogue: Tuco is a murderer, thief and alcoholic, but very personable.
* {{MacGuffin}}: The buried Confederate gold.



* MultiCharacterTitle



* MyGodYouAreSerious:
-->'''Angel Eyes''': ''(to Baker)'' Oh, I almost forgot -- he paid me a thousand. I think his idea was that I kill you.
-->''(both laugh)''
-->'''Angel Eyes''': …but you know, the pity is when I'm paid, I always follow my job through. You know that.
-->'''Baker''': No! Angel Eyes!



* NeverTrustATrailer: The trailer had a narrator with annoying diction continually blurting out, "The Good... The Bad... and the UGLY" over footage of the three title characters. Unfortunately, because the original Italian title (''Il Buono, il Brutto, il Cattivo'') translates literally as 'The Good, The Ugly, The Bad', Angel Eyes and Tuco were swapped in the trailer, making poor Lee Van Cleef appear to be the 'ugly'. Eli Wallach must have been flattered.



* NiceMeanAndInBetween: Played with. Blondie (nice) is an UnscrupulousHero, Angel Eyes (mean) is pure evil, and Tuco (in-between) is an AntiVillain, a thoroughly despicable person who is by far the most human character in the whole movie, made likable by how funny and childish he is and caught between the other two outlaws, who act like forces of nature rather than people.
* NoisyGuns: Inverted when Tuco is displeased with the loud clicks that a revolver makes as its cylinder is turned, indicating its poor quality. He dismantles several pistols to construct his own from the parts, and then demonstrates to the clerk that the new gun clicks very softly when its cylinder is rotated.



* NoMacGuffinNoWinner: The battle segment ends with Blondie and Tuco destroying the bridge (a Third Option the captain had suggested earlier) so that the armies will go elsewhere.



* OffscreenTeleportation

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* OffscreenTeleportationOffscreenTeleportation: This was possibly the ''first'' movie to use this deliberately, and to great effect. Leone specifically shot the movie with the idea that the characters could only be aware of what the camera saw. The most noticeable moments are probably Angel Eyes managing to sneak up on the other two in an empty graveyard, and when Blondie and Tuco walk into ''the middle of a Union encampment'' without noticing.



* OneWomanWail: "The Ecstasy of Gold". Not so much a One Woman Wail as a One Woman Orgasmic Scream, though.



* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: Angel Eyes.



* OverlyLongName: Tuco Benedicto Paci­fico Juan Maria Ramirez, "known as the Rat"

to:

* OverlyLongName: Tuco Benedicto Paci­fico Juan Maria Ramirez, "known as the Rat"Rat".
* ParasolOfPrettiness: When Tuco is CrossingTheDesert on horseback he's not only wearing a sombrero, he puts up a pretty pink parasol as well. Blondie however is bareheaded and on foot, as Tuco wants him to die a slow death of heatstroke or thirst.



* PluckyComicRelief: Tuco might qualify, given that most, if not all of the humorous moments in the film involve him in one form or another. Unlike most examples, Tuco is the protagonist instead of a side character.



* PrecisionFStrike:
** As Tuco reunites with his old partners in crime while planning his revenge on Joe for leaving him in the desert after saving him from the noose a second time:
-->'''Tuco''': And people talk ''bullshit''.
** Right after said second attempt to hang him, Tuco has this to say about how it feels to be hanged:
-->'''Tuco''': When that rope starts to pull tight you can feel the devil bite your ass!



* PriceOnTheirHead: Blondie and Tuco run a scam where Blondie turns Tuco in for the reward money ($2,000) and then rescues him from the hangman and they split the bounty.



* RedOniBlueOni: Tuco (red) and Blondie (blue)

to:

* RedOniBlueOni: Tuco (red) and Blondie (blue)(blue).
* RevolversAreJustBetter: Tuco enters a general store and is unimpressed by the storekeep's selection of revolvers. He breaks the guns down and assembles a new gun from the parts that meet his high expectations. In reality, this would have been fairly improbable. Gun parts at the time were rarely interchangeable even between guns of the same model.


Added DiffLines:

* SayMyName: In the final scene, Blondie forces Tuco to stand on a cross with a noose around his neck as punishment for everything the latter has done to the former, then rides away with half the bags of gold they were looking for. As the tension builds and builds, Tuco, bound, unarmed and helpless, screams '''''BLONDIE!''''' several times, and each time he does, he almost loses his footing on the cross. [[spoiler: Don't worry about him, though, he's saved at the last minute.]]
* ScariltyCompetentTracker: In an ordinary movie, either Angel Eyes or Blondie would be one. But here, everyone can track anyone like this.


Added DiffLines:

* SequelEscalation: The film is nothing short of ''epic'', with a cast of thousands, huge battle scenes, impressive set pieces, more elaborate music, a staggering body count, and nearly double the runtime of either of the previous movies.


Added DiffLines:

* SilenceIsGolden: The film runs ten minutes before anybody speaks. Also, in the final climactic three way duel, there is no dialogue at all for over five minutes, and the film relies entirely on the score, and closeups of the three main character's faces, each trying decide whether to move first. It is widely considered to be one of the most dramatic and tense moments in film history.
27th Jan '17 1:26:26 AM youfeelingluckypunk27
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* SoundtrackDissonance: The hauntingly beautiful "Story of a Soldier" is played while Tuco is brutally tortured.

to:

* SoundtrackDissonance: The hauntingly beautiful "Story of a Soldier" is played while Tuco is brutally tortured. Then again, the lyrics show the song to be a poignant lament about the fallen soldiers of the Civil War, making the scene double the tearjerker.
27th Jan '17 1:23:27 AM youfeelingluckypunk27
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Added DiffLines:

* VillainProtagonist: Tuco, who has the most screentime and character development.
26th Jan '17 12:26:33 PM TrollBrutal
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During UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, the bounty hunter [[NoNameGiven "Blondie"]] (Creator/ClintEastwood) and the bandit Tuco (Eli Wallach) are running a con game until the former decides to terminate their partnership and take the money. Tuco sets out for revenge. A mercenary, Angel Eyes (Creator/LeeVanCleef), finds out about a stolen cache of Confederate gold, and learns the name of the man who knows where it's hidden. Tuco and Blondie stumble upon this knowledge and the three gunslingers engage in a battle of betrayal across the war-torn landscape.

to:

During UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, the bounty hunter [[NoNameGiven "Blondie"]] (Creator/ClintEastwood) and the bandit Tuco (Eli Wallach) (Creator/EliWallach) are running a con game until the former decides to terminate their partnership and take the money. Tuco sets out for revenge. A mercenary, Angel Eyes (Creator/LeeVanCleef), finds out about a stolen cache of Confederate gold, and learns the name of the man who knows where it's hidden. Tuco and Blondie stumble upon this knowledge and the three gunslingers engage in a battle of betrayal across the war-torn landscape.
26th Jan '17 12:07:53 PM tvtropesruinedmylife22
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During UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, the bounty hunter [[NoNameGiven "Blondie"]] (Creator/ClintEastwood) and the bandit Tuco (Creator/EliWallach) are running a con game until the former decides to terminate their partnership and take the money. Tuco sets out for revenge. A mercenary, Angel Eyes (Creator/LeeVanCleef), finds out about a stolen cache of Confederate gold, and learns the name of the man who knows where it's hidden. Tuco and Blondie stumble upon this knowledge and the three gunslingers engage in a battle of betrayal across the war-torn landscape.

to:

During UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, the bounty hunter [[NoNameGiven "Blondie"]] (Creator/ClintEastwood) and the bandit Tuco (Creator/EliWallach) (Eli Wallach) are running a con game until the former decides to terminate their partnership and take the money. Tuco sets out for revenge. A mercenary, Angel Eyes (Creator/LeeVanCleef), finds out about a stolen cache of Confederate gold, and learns the name of the man who knows where it's hidden. Tuco and Blondie stumble upon this knowledge and the three gunslingers engage in a battle of betrayal across the war-torn landscape.
28th Dec '16 1:38:27 AM youfeelingluckypunk27
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** Jackson lost an eye when the £200,000 went missing.



* FanDisservice: No, Tuco, we did not need to see your naked wet behind as you're getting out of the bath.

to:

* FanDisservice: No, Tuco, we did not need {{Fanservice}}: Eli Wallach gets to show off his great body, nude, in a couple of scenes. We even see your his naked wet behind as you're he's getting out of the bath.bath!
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