History Film / TheCountOfMonteCristo

3rd Jul '16 12:55:37 AM Morgenthaler
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* TheObiWan: Abbé Faria to Dantes.
23rd Apr '16 9:56:31 PM SpectralTime
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* AdaptationalHeroism: The Count's schemes result in a ''lot'' less collateral damage than in the novel.



* AdaptationDistillation: Inevitably given its size, large swathes of Dumas' novel are omitted or trimmed. Prominent characters such as Caderousse, Haydée, Franz d'Epinay, Benedetto, Bertuccio and Ali are also omitted.

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* AdaptationDistillation: Inevitably given its size, large swathes of Dumas' novel are omitted or trimmed. Prominent characters such as Caderousse, Haydée, Franz d'Epinay, Benedetto, Bertuccio and Ali are also omitted. Nonetheless, it keeps to the plot and themes of the novel admirably.
12th Feb '16 11:54:04 AM dieseldragons
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* ContrivedCoincidence: Abbe Faria, the sole living man who knows the location of the treasure of Monte Cristo, tunneled his way into Dantes's cell by accident.
27th Sep '15 11:52:18 AM Morgenthaler
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* EarnYourHappyEnding: [[spoiler:After being betrayed by his jealous friends on the eve of his wedding and condemned to spend years in a dungeon by a self-serving prosecutor, and then learning that his grief-stricken father committed suicide and his beloved fiancee married his enemy,]] Dantes would be forgiven for feeling [[WhiteHeat on top of the world]] [[spoiler:as he left the Chateau d'If for the last time with his true love, his son and his best friend at his side, the vast Spada fortune in his possession, and having exacted sweet revenge on his betrayers]].

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* EarnYourHappyEnding: [[spoiler:After being betrayed by his jealous friends on the eve of his wedding and condemned to spend years in a dungeon by a self-serving prosecutor, and then learning that his grief-stricken father committed suicide and his beloved fiancee married his enemy,]] Dantes would be forgiven for feeling [[WhiteHeat [[Film/WhiteHeat on top of the world]] [[spoiler:as he left the Chateau d'If for the last time with his true love, his son and his best friend at his side, the vast Spada fortune in his possession, and having exacted sweet revenge on his betrayers]].
5th Sep '15 3:54:38 PM nombretomado
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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: Cameo appearance by NapoleonBonaparte.

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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: Cameo appearance by NapoleonBonaparte.UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte.
6th Aug '15 3:31:56 AM DrDougsh
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*
** AdaptationalVillainy: The warden of Chateau d'If, named Armand Dorleac in the film, is depicted as a sadist who tortures prisoners as part of an annual rite, despite the fact that he knows perfectly well that all the prisoners in Chateau d'If are innocent. In the book he did no such thing, never gave any indication of knowing his prisoners were innocent, and didn't even put Dantes in isolation until after a violent outburst on his part.

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* AdaptationalVillainy:
** AdaptationalVillainy: The warden of Chateau d'If, named Armand Dorleac in the film, is depicted as a sadist who tortures prisoners as part of an annual rite, despite the fact that he knows perfectly well that all the prisoners in Chateau d'If are innocent. In the book he did no such thing, never gave any indication of knowing his prisoners were innocent, and didn't even put Dantes in isolation until after a violent outburst on his part.
6th Aug '15 3:31:33 AM DrDougsh
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* AdaptationalVillainy: The warden of Chateau d'If, named Armand Dorleac in the film, is depicted as a sadist who tortures prisoners as part of an annual rite, despite the fact that he knows perfectly well that all the prisoners in Chateau d'If are innocent. In the book he did no such thing, never gave any indication of knowing his prisoners were innocent, and didn't even put Dantes in isolation until after a violent outburst on his part.

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**
AdaptationalVillainy: The warden of Chateau d'If, named Armand Dorleac in the film, is depicted as a sadist who tortures prisoners as part of an annual rite, despite the fact that he knows perfectly well that all the prisoners in Chateau d'If are innocent. In the book he did no such thing, never gave any indication of knowing his prisoners were innocent, and didn't even put Dantes in isolation until after a violent outburst on his part.part.
** Fernand was already an unscrupulous serial traitor in the book, but the movie goes out of its way to make him as deeply repulsive as possible -- in the book, he and Edmond weren't friends to begin with, so the betrayal was not as deeply personal. The book's Fernand was also not explicitly unfaithful to Mercedes, nor did he routinely challenge people to duels for sport; he also did not show as much distain for his son Albert. The book's Fernand was also not a born aristocrat, so he lacks the classist tendencies of the film character.
5th Aug '15 2:51:40 PM DrDougsh
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalVillainy: The warden of Chateau d'If, named Armand Dorleac in the film, is depicted as a sadist who tortures prisoners as part of an annual rite, despite the fact that he knows perfectly well that all the prisoners in Chateau d'If are innocent. In the book he did no such thing, never gave any indication of knowing his prisoners were innocent, and didn't even put Dantes in isolation until after a violent outburst on his part.
30th May '15 2:38:13 AM BlackTemplar
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* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: The movie is adapted from the TropeCodifier.
12th May '15 11:57:48 AM duranaparthur
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Added DiffLines:

** Fernand then gives Edmond a king piece as Edmond is dragged away, to "remember better times." When they next meet, Edmond manipulates Fernand in turn, ultimately winning.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.TheCountOfMonteCristo