History Film / PublicEnemies

13th Aug '17 11:43:40 PM MatthewRenn
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Added DiffLines:

* TheCameo: As is common in MichaelMann films, they're are plenty of recognizable faces popping up in minor or supporting roles that sometimes last little more than seconds.
** CareyMulligan as a prostitute.
** ChanningTatum as bank robber Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd moments before he's shot and killed.
** MMA legend Don Frye as FBI Agent Clarence Hunt, one of the men who shoots and kills Dillinger.
** GiovanniRibisi as Dillinger's contact Alvin Karpis.
** LiliTaylor as Sheriff Lillian Holley, Dillinger's jailer.
** LeeleeSobieski as Polly, the waitress whom accompanies Dillinger to the Biograph theater.
** Matt Craven as FBI Agent Gerry Campbell.


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* OneSceneWonder: James Russo as Walter Dietrich, whose killed in the opening scene but whose brief appearance leaves quite an impression.
** ChanningTatum as Pretty Boy Floyd, if only for the sake that it's Channing Tatum and that he finishes his brief appearance by getting killed off in a rather gruesome way.
26th Apr '17 7:18:36 PM AllenbysEyes88
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* AdaptationDistillation: Burrough's book profiles Dillinger alongside a number of other criminals, as mentioned above: while he receives a lot of attention, he's not especially prominent in the story line compared to the other figures. With the movie focusing on Dillinger (and Purvis, to a lesser extent), most of them are either excluded entirely (Bonnie and Clyde, Machine Gun Kelly, the Barkers) or DemotedToExtra (Floyd, Karpis, Nelson). In particular, the movie makes no reference to the Kansas City Massacre which is the central event in the FBI's promotion

to:

* AdaptationDistillation: Burrough's book profiles Dillinger alongside a number of other criminals, as mentioned above: while he receives a lot of attention, he's not especially prominent in the story line compared to the other figures. With the movie focusing on Dillinger (and Purvis, to a lesser extent), most of them are either excluded entirely (Bonnie and Clyde, Machine Gun Kelly, the Barkers) or DemotedToExtra (Floyd, Karpis, Nelson). In particular, the The movie also makes no reference to the Kansas City Massacre Massacre, which is the central event in the FBI's promotionrise to prominence.
26th Apr '17 7:18:00 PM AllenbysEyes88
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* AdaptationDistillation: Burrough's book profiles Dillinger alongside a number of other criminals, as mentioned above: while he receives a lot of attention, he's not especially prominent in the storyline compared to the other figures. With the movie focusing on Dillinger (and Purvis, to a lesser extent), most of them are either excluded entirely (Bonnie and Clyde, Machine Gun Kelly, the Barkers) or DemotedToExtra (Floyd, Karpis).

to:

* AdaptationDistillation: Burrough's book profiles Dillinger alongside a number of other criminals, as mentioned above: while he receives a lot of attention, he's not especially prominent in the storyline story line compared to the other figures. With the movie focusing on Dillinger (and Purvis, to a lesser extent), most of them are either excluded entirely (Bonnie and Clyde, Machine Gun Kelly, the Barkers) or DemotedToExtra (Floyd, Karpis).Karpis, Nelson). In particular, the movie makes no reference to the Kansas City Massacre which is the central event in the FBI's promotion


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* HauledBeforeASenateSubcommittee: J. Edgar Hoover's introductory scene is testifying before the [=McKellar=] committee, trying to justify increased funding for the FBI. This actually happened in RealLife, but ''after'' the film's events.
26th Apr '17 7:15:43 PM AllenbysEyes88
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The film was based on the book ''Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 193334'' by Bryan Borrough, which covers all of the major bank robber gangs active from 1933 to 1936 and the FBI's work to stop them, including Dillinger, the Barker-Karpis gang, Bonnie and Clyde, and Pretty Boy Floyd.

to:

The film was based on the book ''Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 193334'' by Bryan Borrough, Burrough, which covers all of the major bank robber gangs active from 1933 to 1936 and the FBI's work to stop them, including Dillinger, the Barker-Karpis gang, Bonnie and Clyde, and Pretty Boy Floyd.




to:

* AdaptationDistillation: Burrough's book profiles Dillinger alongside a number of other criminals, as mentioned above: while he receives a lot of attention, he's not especially prominent in the storyline compared to the other figures. With the movie focusing on Dillinger (and Purvis, to a lesser extent), most of them are either excluded entirely (Bonnie and Clyde, Machine Gun Kelly, the Barkers) or DemotedToExtra (Floyd, Karpis).
1st Mar '17 6:52:46 AM JamesAustin
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The film was based on the book ''Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 193334'' by Bryan Borrough, which covers all of the major bank robber gangs active from 1933 to 1936 and the FBI's work to stop them, including Dillinger, the Barker-Karpis gang, BonnieAndClyde, and Pretty Boy Floyd.

to:

The film was based on the book ''Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 193334'' by Bryan Borrough, which covers all of the major bank robber gangs active from 1933 to 1936 and the FBI's work to stop them, including Dillinger, the Barker-Karpis gang, BonnieAndClyde, Bonnie and Clyde, and Pretty Boy Floyd.



* AllThereInTheManual[=/=]AllThereInTheScript: The screenplay gives numerous characters, even bit part ones, names, even if they aren't mentioned on screen: these include the cops at the first bank robbery, the names of those who get shot in the third bank robbery, and others. The source historical novel also helps describe some of the unnamed characters. For example, the motorcycle cop gunned down by Nelson at the third bank robbery is named Hale Keith (and this little part actually did happen).

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* AllThereInTheManual[=/=]AllThereInTheScript: AllThereInTheManual: The source historical novel helps describe some of the unnamed characters. For example, the motorcycle cop gunned down by Nelson at the third bank robbery is named Hale Keith (and this little part actually did happen).
* AllThereInTheScript:
The screenplay gives numerous characters, even bit part ones, names, even if they aren't mentioned on screen: these include the cops at the first bank robbery, the names of those who get shot in the third bank robbery, and others. The source historical novel also helps describe some of the unnamed characters. For example, the motorcycle cop gunned down by Nelson at the third bank robbery is named Hale Keith (and this little part actually did happen).



* ArtisticLicense: Though the film is arguably one of the more accurate adaptations of this period, it still takes some liberties (as noted below).

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* ArtisticLicense: ArtisticLicenseHistory: Though the film is arguably one of the more accurate adaptations of this period, it still takes some liberties (as noted below).



* ShoutOut: Dillinger says to a bank customer, [[Film/{{Heat}} "You can put it away. I'm not here for your money, I'm here for the bank's money."]] While it may be a reference to Michael Mann's earlier work, Dillinger actually said these words during his January 15, 1934 robbery of the First National Bank in East Chicago, Indiana. For whatever reason, some misattribute this line to BonnieAndClyde (as Clyde was quoted as having said a similar line during a late February bank job). Some think that Clyde was intentionally modeling himself on Dillinger and attempting to [[VillainWithGoodPublicity clean up his act]], as the real Clyde had more in common with Baby-Face Nelson than most Hollywood portrayals would tell you.

to:

* ShoutOut: Dillinger says to a bank customer, [[Film/{{Heat}} "You can put it away. I'm not here for your money, I'm here for the bank's money."]] While it may be a reference to Michael Mann's earlier work, Dillinger actually said these words during his January 15, 1934 robbery of the First National Bank in East Chicago, Indiana. For whatever reason, some misattribute this line to BonnieAndClyde Bonnie and Clyde (as Clyde was quoted as having said a similar line during a late February bank job). Some think that Clyde was intentionally modeling himself on Dillinger and attempting to [[VillainWithGoodPublicity clean up his act]], as the real Clyde had more in common with Baby-Face Nelson than most Hollywood portrayals would tell you.
18th Jan '17 9:05:39 AM jamespolk
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The film was based on the novel ''Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 193334'' by Bryan Borrough, which covers all of the major bank robber gangs active from 1933 to 1936 and the FBI's work to stop them, including Dillinger, the Barker-Karpis gang, BonnieAndClyde, and Pretty Boy Floyd.

to:

The film was based on the novel book ''Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 193334'' by Bryan Borrough, which covers all of the major bank robber gangs active from 1933 to 1936 and the FBI's work to stop them, including Dillinger, the Barker-Karpis gang, BonnieAndClyde, and Pretty Boy Floyd.
12th Nov '16 4:13:12 PM nombretomado
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** The actual [[http://www.upi.com/topic/John_Dillinger/ John Dillinger]] wasn't nearly as comely as JohnnyDepp (generally the case when Johnny Depp portrays a real-life person.)

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** The actual [[http://www.upi.com/topic/John_Dillinger/ John Dillinger]] wasn't nearly as comely as JohnnyDepp Creator/JohnnyDepp (generally the case when Johnny Depp portrays a real-life person.)
1st Oct '16 12:00:17 AM BaronVonFistcrunch
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** TruthInTelevision: The "College Boys" (as they were sarcastically nicknamed by local police departments) sucked when it came to engaging or capturing fugitives, with their incompetency being such that four times in as many weeks in April 1934, agents came within spitting distance of Dillinger but he managed to escape from them.[[labelnote:First attempt]]The first was in St. Paul on April 1, when FBI Agents Rufus Coulter and Rusty Nalls, and St. Paul Police Detective Henry Cummings stopped by an apartment Billie and Dillinger were living in, responding to a suspicious persons complaint. Billie woke Dillinger up, and Dillinger quickly started assembling his gun. Van Meter also showed up and spotted the detectives. After heading downstairs to his car, Agent Coulter followed him. When he got to the basement stairs, Van Meter opened fire on him and he ran for the car. Dillinger fired a burst at Cummings upstairs. Once the police were incapacitated, Dillinger, Billie and Van Meter escaped out an unguarded door.[[/labelnote]] [[labelnote:Second attempt]]A week later, Dillinger returned to his family's farm in Mooresville, Indiana, which the FBI had under surveillance. At one point, FBI car drove right [ast Dillinger and neither agent in the car recognized him.[[/labelnote]] [[labelnote:Third attempt]]The third time was Billie Frechette's capture, where agents walked mere feet from Dillinger as he sat in the car. He ultimately drove away without being seen. It was much like shown in the movie, except that Purvis was also present and actually realized too late that Dillinger had been in the car that Billie arrived in.[[/labelnote]] [[labelnote]]Little Bohemia was the fourth encounter, and the last straw. These incidents were the reason Hoover ordered men like Charles Winstead, Jerry Campbell, Clarence Hurt, and Herman Hollis to Chicago, for their marksmanship.[[/labelnote]]

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** TruthInTelevision: The "College Boys" (as they were sarcastically nicknamed by local police departments) sucked when it came to engaging or capturing fugitives, with their incompetency being such that four times in as many weeks in April 1934, agents came within spitting distance of Dillinger but he managed to escape from them.[[labelnote:First attempt]]The first was in St. Paul on April 1, when FBI Agents Rufus Coulter and Rusty Nalls, and St. Paul Police Detective Henry Cummings stopped by an apartment Billie and Dillinger were living in, responding to a suspicious persons complaint. Billie woke Dillinger up, and Dillinger quickly started assembling his gun. Van Meter also showed up and spotted the detectives. After heading downstairs to his car, Agent Coulter followed him. When he got to the basement stairs, Van Meter opened fire on him and he ran for the car. Dillinger fired a burst at Cummings upstairs. Once the police were incapacitated, Dillinger, Billie and Van Meter escaped out an unguarded door.[[/labelnote]] [[labelnote:Second attempt]]A week later, Dillinger returned to his family's farm in Mooresville, Indiana, which the FBI had under surveillance. At one point, FBI car drove right [ast Dillinger and neither agent in the car recognized him.[[/labelnote]] [[labelnote:Third attempt]]The third time was Billie Frechette's capture, where agents walked mere feet from Dillinger as he sat in the car. He ultimately drove away without being seen. It was much like shown in the movie, except that Purvis was also present and actually realized too late that Dillinger had been in the car that Billie arrived in.[[/labelnote]] [[labelnote]]Little [[labelnote:Fourth attempt]]Little Bohemia was the fourth encounter, and the last straw. These incidents were the reason Hoover ordered men like Charles Winstead, Jerry Campbell, Clarence Hurt, and Herman Hollis to Chicago, for their marksmanship.[[/labelnote]]



* ShoutOut: Dillinger says to a bank customer, [[Film/{{Heat}} "You can put it away. I'm not here for your money, I'm here for the bank's money."]] While it may be a reference to Michael Mann's earlier work, Dillinger actually said these words during his January 15, 1934 robbery of the First National Bank in East Chicago, Indiana. For whatever reason, some misattribute this line to BonnieAndClyde (as Clyde was quoted as having said a similar line during a late February bank job). Some thing that Clyde was intentionally modeling himself on Dillinger and attempting to [[VillainWithGoodPublicity clean up his act.]]

to:

* ShoutOut: Dillinger says to a bank customer, [[Film/{{Heat}} "You can put it away. I'm not here for your money, I'm here for the bank's money."]] While it may be a reference to Michael Mann's earlier work, Dillinger actually said these words during his January 15, 1934 robbery of the First National Bank in East Chicago, Indiana. For whatever reason, some misattribute this line to BonnieAndClyde (as Clyde was quoted as having said a similar line during a late February bank job). Some thing think that Clyde was intentionally modeling himself on Dillinger and attempting to [[VillainWithGoodPublicity clean up his act.]]act]], as the real Clyde had more in common with Baby-Face Nelson than most Hollywood portrayals would tell you.
15th Sep '16 10:32:32 AM dmcreif
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* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Almost all of the gang members had girlfriends. Dillinger first has Billie Frechette, and then after her arrest, a waitress named Polly Hamilton.

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* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Almost all of the gang members had girlfriends. Dillinger first has had Billie Frechette, and then after her arrest, a waitress named Polly Hamilton.



** Dillinger's lawyer manages to keep him out of the Indiana State Prison in Michigan City by saying that Sheriff Lillian Holley is a woman, and therefore afraid that she can't keep him locked up in minimum security, [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment because she's a woman]]. "I'm not afraid!" Judge William Murray immediately concludes that means she thinks Dillinger should stay in Crown Point. Because of this, Dillinger is able to carve the wooden pistol and escape with ease.

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** Dillinger's shady defense lawyer Louis Piquett manages to keep him out of the Indiana State Prison in Michigan City by saying that Sheriff Lillian Holley is a woman, and therefore afraid that she can't keep him locked up in minimum security, [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment because she's a woman]]. "I'm not afraid!" Judge William Murray immediately concludes that means she thinks Dillinger should stay in Crown Point. Because of this, Dillinger is able to carve the wooden pistol and escape with ease.



* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: This version of Dillinger has several bodies that can be attributed to him: two Racine cops and a Sioux Falls cop. In reality, Dillinger planned his robberies around ''not'' killing people. The only time he ever killed someone was on January 15, 1934 when he shot and killed Officer William O'Malley during a bank robbery in East Chicago, Indiana (it was this murder that Dillinger was awaiting trial for when he broke out of Crown Point), and even then, whether Dillinger was the one who shot O'Malley or not has sometimes been called into question. While in several of Dillinger's bank robberies, people did get shot, the person who shot them was typically Nelson or Van Meter.

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* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: This version of Dillinger has several bodies that can be attributed to him: two Racine cops and a Sioux Falls cop. In reality, Dillinger planned his robberies around ''not'' killing people. The It's believed the only time he ever Dillinger killed someone was on January 15, 1934 when he shot and killed Officer William O'Malley during a bank robbery in East Chicago, Indiana Indiana, when he killed a police officer named William O'Malley (it was this murder that Dillinger was awaiting trial for when he broke out of Crown Point), and even then, whether Dillinger was the one who shot O'Malley or not has sometimes been called into question. While in several of Dillinger's bank robberies, people did get shot, the person who shot them was typically Nelson or Van Meter.



** A minor point is that Dillinger dies after Pretty Boy Floyd, Homer Van Meter, and Baby Face Nelson in the film, whereas in RealLife he died before any of those three: Van Meter was shot to death by police in St. Paul in late August. Floyd was gunned down October 22, 1934 in East Liverpool, Ohio, and Nelson died in a shootout on November 27, 1934 in Barrington, Illinois that also led to the deaths of Samuel P. Cowley and Herman Hollis.
** Floyd, too, was allegedly shot after being disarmed, though this is a more controversial account given by a local police officer. The Feds were actually ''worse'' in reality than they were in the movie, while Purvis himself was perhaps a bit ''better'' here than he was in real life. In this film, Purvis shoots down Nelson, Floyd, and Van Meter, when in reality, the former two were killed in shootings that happened without Purvis[[note]]In Floyd's case, Purvis was present but wasn't one of those who shot him[[/note]], and Van Meter was killed by St. Paul police.[[note]]The account that Mann seems to use for Floyd's death is the FBI account, which states that Floyd was shot by a sniper from a great distance (although the real shooting happened on an open field, not in an apple orchard). Here, the film gives that role to Purvis. The film also uses the real Purvis's claim that he kicked a pistol out of Floyd's hand.[[/note]]
** Dillinger did not personally participate in the September 26 breakout of his future accomplices from the Indiana State Penitentiary, as he was imprisoned in Lima, Ohio at the time. Dillinger was also relatively unknown before the mass breakout, except to Matt Leach of the Indiana State Police - Dillinger's name first presumably became known to many after he himself was broken out of a jail in Lima.

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** A minor point is that Dillinger dies after Pretty Boy Floyd, Homer Van Meter, and Baby Face Nelson in the film, whereas in RealLife he died before any of those three: Van Meter was shot to death by police in St. Paul in late August. Floyd was gunned down October 22, 1934 in East Liverpool, Ohio, Ohio; and Nelson died in a shootout on November 27, 1934 in Barrington, Illinois that also led to the deaths of Samuel P. Cowley and Herman Hollis.
** Floyd, too, was allegedly shot after being disarmed, though this is a more controversial account given by a local police officer. The Feds were actually ''worse'' in reality than they were in the movie, while Purvis himself was perhaps a bit ''better'' here than he was in real life. In this film, Purvis shoots down Nelson, Floyd, and Van Meter, when in reality, the former two were killed in shootings that happened without Purvis[[note]]In Purvis present[[note]]In Floyd's case, Purvis was present but wasn't one of those who shot him[[/note]], and Van Meter was killed by St. Paul police.[[note]]The account that Mann seems to use for Floyd's death is the FBI account, which states that Floyd was shot by a sniper from a great distance (although the real shooting happened on an open field, not in an apple orchard). Here, the film gives that role to Purvis. The film also uses the real Purvis's claim that he kicked a pistol out of Floyd's hand.[[/note]]
** **While Dillinger did not personally participate in orchestrate the September 26 26, 1933 breakout of his future accomplices from the Indiana State Penitentiary, he did not participate in the breakout as he was imprisoned in jail in Lima, Ohio at the time. awaiting trial for a bank robbery in Bluffton, Ohio. Dillinger was also relatively unknown before the mass breakout, except to Matt Leach of the Indiana State Police - Dillinger's wasn't a household name first presumably became known to many at the time, only becoming this after he himself was broken out of a jail in Lima.out.



** Billie Frechette's arrest happens after the shootout at Little Bohemia Lodge. In reality it was the opposite. Part of the reason the Dillinger gang went to Little Bohemia was in part to allow Dillinger to take his mind off Billie.
** Little Bohemia is shown as being used by the gang as a hideout after a disastrous bank robbery in Sioux Falls, completely skipping over the gang's robbery of the First National Bank in Mason City, Iowa on March 13; Dillinger, Billie and Van Meter's narrow escape from police in St. Paul on April 1st; and a visit to Hamilton's sister Anna Steve a few days before Little Bohemia.
** Purvis and his men are pursuing Dillinger in the first half of the film. In reality, the most the FBI did insofar as get involved in the Dillinger manhunt was attend a number of conferences and offer to help in fingerprinting; following the death of Lima, Ohio's sheriff during the liberation of Dillinger from that jail, Hoover actually ignored pleas from Indiana governor Paul [=McNutt=] for the FBI's help. So in this time period, responsibility for pursuing the Dillinger gang fell to the Indiana State Police.

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** Billie Frechette's arrest happens is shown happening after the shootout at Little Bohemia Lodge. In reality it was the opposite. Part of the reason the Dillinger gang went to Little Bohemia was in part to allow Dillinger to take his mind off Billie.
** Little Bohemia is shown as being used by the gang as a hideout after a disastrous bank robbery in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The two events actually happened about a month and a half apart, and the movie completely skipping skips over the gang's things that happened in the interim: a bank robbery of the First National Bank in Mason City, Iowa on March 13; Iowa; Dillinger, Billie and Van Meter's narrow escape from after a shootout with police in St. Paul on April 1st; Paul; and a visit to Hamilton's sister Anna Steve a few days before Little Bohemia.
** Purvis and his men are pursuing Dillinger in the first half of the film. In reality, the most the FBI did insofar as get involved in the Dillinger manhunt was attend a number of conferences and offer to help in fingerprinting; following the death of Lima, Ohio's sheriff during the liberation of Dillinger from that jail, Hoover actually ignored pleas from Indiana governor Governor Paul [=McNutt=] for the FBI's help. So in this time period, responsibility for pursuing the Dillinger gang fell to the Indiana State Police.



** First is Baby Face Nelson's death: Purvis fires a single shot with his pistol and another agent, Madala, fires a shotgun at the same time. Both bullets hit Nelson in the chest. He falls over, but gets back up on his knees and manages to fire a wild burst with his submachine gun despite being badly wounded and more bullets entering his body. Purvis fires at least twelve more rounds with his pistol before Nelson dies permanently (which has something to do with actual police procedure).

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** First is Baby Face Nelson's death: Purvis fires a single shot with his pistol and another agent, Madala, fires a shotgun at the same time. Both bullets hit Nelson in the chest. He falls over, but gets back up on his knees and manages to fire a wild burst with his submachine gun despite being badly wounded and more bullets entering his body. Purvis fires at least twelve more rounds with his pistol before Nelson dies permanently (which has something to do is in line with actual police procedure).training: continue to shoot the target until it falls).



*** However, it is worth noting that Tommy Carroll had not ever been tortured for information. He really died on June 7, when he was shot by a Waterloo police detective acting on a filling station attendant's tip about a "tough customer". In fact, a different Dillinger gang member, Eddie Green, received the gunshot wound that Carroll receives in the movie (bullet entering the back of his head and coming to a rest above the right eye) when he was ambushed by police in St. Paul in early April.

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*** However, it is worth noting that the real Tommy Carroll had not ever been was never tortured for information. He really died on June 7, when he was shot by a Waterloo police detective acting on a filling station attendant's tip about a "tough customer". In fact, a different Dillinger gang member, Eddie Green, received the gunshot wound that Carroll receives in the movie (bullet entering the back of his head and coming to a rest above the right eye) when he was ambushed by police in St. Paul in early April.



** And Dillinger was actually responsible for the passing of a number of bills. Nelson's shooting of Agent Carter Baum at Little Bohemia made killing a federal agent a federal offense, something Hoover had been lobbying for years to get passed.

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** And Dillinger was actually responsible for the passing of a number of important crime legislation bills. Nelson's shooting of Agent Carter Baum at Little Bohemia made killing a federal agent a federal offense, something Hoover had been lobbying for years to get passed.



** TruthInTelevision - The "College Boys" (as they were sarcastically nicknamed by local police departments) sucked when it came to engaging or capturing fugitives - as evidenced by the fact that four times in as many weeks in April 1934, agents came within feet of Dillinger but he managed to escape from them. To elaborate:
*** The first was in St. Paul on April 1, when FBI Agents Rufus Coulter and Rusty Nalls, and St. Paul Police Detective Henry Cummings stopped by an apartent Billie and Dillinger were living in, responding to a suspicious persons complaint. Billie woke Dillinger up, and Dillinger quickly started assembling his gun. Van Meter also showed up and spotted the detectives. After heading downstairs to his car, Agent Coulter followed him. When he got to the basement stairs, Van Meter opened fire on him and he ran for the car. Dillinger fired a burst at Cummings upstairs. Once the police were incapacitated, Dillinger, Billie and Van Meter escaped out an unguarded door.
*** A week later, near Dillinger's father's farm in Mooresville, Indiana, an FBI car drove right by Dillinger and neither agent in the car recognized him.
*** The third time was Billie Frechette's capture, where agents walked mere feet from Dillinger as he sat in the car. He ultimately drove away without being seen. It was much like shown in the movie, except that Purvis was also present and actually realized too late that Dillinger had been in the car that Billie arrived in.
*** Little Bohemia was the fourth encounter, and the last straw. These incidents were the reason Hoover ordered men like Charles Winstead, Jerry Campbell, Clarence Hurt, and Herman Hollis to Chicago, for their marksmanship.

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** TruthInTelevision - **TruthInTelevision: The "College Boys" (as they were sarcastically nicknamed by local police departments) sucked when it came to engaging or capturing fugitives - as evidenced by the fact fugitives, with their incompetency being such that four times in as many weeks in April 1934, agents came within feet spitting distance of Dillinger but he managed to escape from them. To elaborate:
*** The
them.[[labelnote:First attempt]]The first was in St. Paul on April 1, when FBI Agents Rufus Coulter and Rusty Nalls, and St. Paul Police Detective Henry Cummings stopped by an apartent apartment Billie and Dillinger were living in, responding to a suspicious persons complaint. Billie woke Dillinger up, and Dillinger quickly started assembling his gun. Van Meter also showed up and spotted the detectives. After heading downstairs to his car, Agent Coulter followed him. When he got to the basement stairs, Van Meter opened fire on him and he ran for the car. Dillinger fired a burst at Cummings upstairs. Once the police were incapacitated, Dillinger, Billie and Van Meter escaped out an unguarded door.
*** A
door.[[/labelnote]] [[labelnote:Second attempt]]A week later, near Dillinger's father's Dillinger returned to his family's farm in Mooresville, Indiana, an which the FBI had under surveillance. At one point, FBI car drove right by [ast Dillinger and neither agent in the car recognized him.
*** The
him.[[/labelnote]] [[labelnote:Third attempt]]The third time was Billie Frechette's capture, where agents walked mere feet from Dillinger as he sat in the car. He ultimately drove away without being seen. It was much like shown in the movie, except that Purvis was also present and actually realized too late that Dillinger had been in the car that Billie arrived in.
*** Little
in.[[/labelnote]] [[labelnote]]Little Bohemia was the fourth encounter, and the last straw. These incidents were the reason Hoover ordered men like Charles Winstead, Jerry Campbell, Clarence Hurt, and Herman Hollis to Chicago, for their marksmanship.[[/labelnote]]



* ShoutOut: Dillinger says to a bank customer, [[Film/{{Heat}} "You can put it away. I'm not here for your money, I'm here for the bank's money."]] But as good a ShoutOut to ''Heat'' as it may be, Dillinger actually said these words during his January 15, 1934 robbery of the First National Bank in East Chicago, Indiana. For whatever reason, some misattribute this line to BonnieAndClyde (as Clyde was quoted as having said a similar line during a late February bank job). Some thing that Clyde was intentionally modeling himself on Dillinger and attempting to [[VillainWithGoodPublicity clean up his act.]]

to:

* ShoutOut: Dillinger says to a bank customer, [[Film/{{Heat}} "You can put it away. I'm not here for your money, I'm here for the bank's money."]] But as good a ShoutOut to ''Heat'' as While it may be, be a reference to Michael Mann's earlier work, Dillinger actually said these words during his January 15, 1934 robbery of the First National Bank in East Chicago, Indiana. For whatever reason, some misattribute this line to BonnieAndClyde (as Clyde was quoted as having said a similar line during a late February bank job). Some thing that Clyde was intentionally modeling himself on Dillinger and attempting to [[VillainWithGoodPublicity clean up his act.]]



*** However, the dialogue is not always consistent with when it actually happened: in the Racine bank robbery (the first one, and the only one we see in full (as we only see the start of the second robbery and join the third robbery midway through its execution)), Dillinger says to the bank manager, "You can be a dead hero or a live coward," after PistolWhipping him. The source book shows that Dillinger actually said it during the escape from Crown Point.

to:

*** However, the dialogue is not always consistent with when it actually happened: in the Racine bank robbery (the first one, and the only one we see in full (as we only see the start of the second robbery and join the third robbery midway through its execution)), Dillinger says to the bank manager, "You can be a dead hero or a live coward," after PistolWhipping him. The source book shows police files show that Dillinger actually said it during the escape from Crown Point.



* VehicularSabotage: When Dillinger escapes from Crown Point, he pulls the distributor and spark cables from a car with an open hood. He is then told it is the sherrif's personal vehicle.

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* VehicularSabotage: When Dillinger escapes from Crown Point, he pulls the distributor and spark cables from a car with an open hood. He is then told it is the sherrif's sheriff's personal vehicle.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Herbert Youngblood, the black inmate who assists Dillinger in his escape from Crown Point, is never seen again after they are shown driving through the open fields. He is never mentioned again, so the conclusion of his story is explained from a number of other books on Dillinger: Youngblood ended up in Huron, Michigan. Two weeks later, he caused a disturbance at a downtown store. Police responded. Reportedly, Youngblood managed to shoot one officer dead and wound another before being shot seven times. He died a few days after that. There were some racial tensions and allegations that a white man present at the scene may have been responsible for some of the shootings.
** Likewise, we never see Pierpont and Makley after they and Dillinger are seen being arrested. In fact, no mention is made about them. In real life, after being arrested, Pierpont, Makley and Russell Clark were packed off to stand trial in Lima, Ohio for the murder of Sheriff Jess Sarber. When put on trial in mid-March 1934 (around the time of Dillinger's escape and his Sioux Falls and Mason City robberies), they were all convicted. Pierpont and Makley attempted to escape death row on September 22, 1934, two months after Dillinger's death, using fake guns carved from soap cakes and painted black with shoe polish. The attempt failed: Makley was killed and Pierpont was executed weeks later.

to:

* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Herbert Youngblood, the black inmate who assists Dillinger in his escape from Crown Point, is never seen again after they are shown driving through the open fields. He is never mentioned again, so the conclusion of his story is explained from a number of other books on Dillinger: Dillinger.[[labelnote:To elaborate]] Youngblood ended up in Huron, Michigan. Two weeks later, he caused a disturbance at a downtown store. Police responded. Reportedly, Youngblood managed to shoot kill one police officer dead and wound another before being shot seven times. He died a few days after that. There were some racial tensions and allegations that a white man present at the scene may have been responsible for some of the shootings.
shootings.[[/labelnote]]
** Likewise, we never see Pierpont and Makley after they and Dillinger are seen being arrested. In fact, no mention is made about them. In [[labelnote:What happened in real life, after life]]After being arrested, Pierpont, Makley and Russell Clark were packed off to stand trial in Lima, Ohio for the murder of Sheriff Jess Sarber. When put on trial in mid-March 1934 (around the time of Dillinger's escape and his Sioux Falls and Mason City robberies), they were all convicted. Pierpont and Makley were given the death penalty. They attempted to escape death row on September 22, 1934, two months after Dillinger's death, using fake guns carved from soap cakes and painted black with shoe polish. The attempt failed: Makley was killed and Pierpont was executed weeks later.[[/labelnote]]
2nd Feb '16 10:44:58 AM gallium
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Compare 1973 film ''Film/{{Dillinger}}''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.PublicEnemies