History Film / Intolerance

22nd Sep '16 9:21:04 PM nombretomado
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It was made in direct response to D.W. Griffith's previous film, ''Film/TheBirthOfANation''. Some stories hold that Griffith was TheAtoner after the backlash to that horrifically racist film. The truth, however, is that Griffith thought the outrage was an example of Main/PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad, and felt the "intolerance" had been directed at him. Regardless of what sparked its creation, the film itself is not specifically about race relations.

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It was made in direct response to D.W. Griffith's previous film, ''Film/TheBirthOfANation''.''Film/{{The Birth of a Nation|1915}}''. Some stories hold that Griffith was TheAtoner after the backlash to that horrifically racist film. The truth, however, is that Griffith thought the outrage was an example of Main/PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad, and felt the "intolerance" had been directed at him. Regardless of what sparked its creation, the film itself is not specifically about race relations.
7th Sep '16 10:17:26 PM jamespolk
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It was made in direct response to D.W. Griffith's previous film, ''Film/TheBirthOfANation''. Some reports hold that Griffith had no idea that ''The Birth Of A Nation'' was based off a racist retelling of history until it was pointed out to him, and was horrified at what he had presented and how he was now perceived; others (including Website/TheOtherWiki) claim that the movie was conceived in a harsher response to those who were outraged by the aforementioned movie, and that Griffith thought the outrage was an example of Main/PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad. Regardless of what sparked its creation, the film itself is not specifically about race relations.

to:

It was made in direct response to D.W. Griffith's previous film, ''Film/TheBirthOfANation''. Some reports stories hold that Griffith had no idea was TheAtoner after the backlash to that ''The Birth Of A Nation'' was based off a horrifically racist retelling of history until it was pointed out to him, and was horrified at what he had presented and how he was now perceived; others (including Website/TheOtherWiki) claim that the movie was conceived in a harsher response to those who were outraged by the aforementioned movie, and film. The truth, however, is that Griffith thought the outrage was an example of Main/PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad.Main/PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad, and felt the "intolerance" had been directed at him. Regardless of what sparked its creation, the film itself is not specifically about race relations.



* "The Fall of Babylon", 539 BC, depicting a holy war between worshipers of different gods.
* The Crucifixion of Jesus, 27 AD
* The St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, 1572 AD
* "The Mother and the Law", 1914 AD, depicting crime, moral puritanism, and conflicts between capitalists and striking workers in America, causing hardship and suffering to those caught in the crossfire

The original concept was to give equal time to all four stories, but that would have made for an even longer film that the massive product Griffith eventually released. The St. Bartholomew's Day story was cut shorter and the Jesus story was cut even more than that; the finished film gives considerably more attention to the modern-day "Mother and the Law" story and the Babylon story than the other two.

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* "The Fall of Babylon", 539 BC, depicting a holy war between worshipers the destruction of different gods.
Babylon by the Persians. Starring Constance Talmadge as the Mountain Girl.
* The "The Crucifixion of Jesus, Jesus", 27 AD
AD, starring Howard Gaye as {{Jesus}}.
* The "The St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, Massacre", 1572 AD
AD, starring Margery Wilson as Brown Eyes and Eugene Palette as Prosper.
* "The Mother and the Law", 1914 AD, depicting crime, moral puritanism, and conflicts between capitalists and striking workers in America, causing hardship and suffering to those caught in the crossfire

crossfire. Starring Mae Marsh as the Dear One, Robert Harron as the Boy, and Miriam Cooper as the Friendless One.

The original concept was to give equal time to all four stories, but that would have made for an even longer film that the massive product Griffith eventually released. The St. Bartholomew's Day story was cut shorter and the Jesus story was cut even more than that; that, being reduced to a few scattered scenes; the finished film gives considerably more attention to the modern-day "Mother and the Law" story and the Babylon story than the other two.



* {{Fanservice}} / FanserviceExtra: The Love Temple in Babylon contains the prince's harem girls, who lounge around in see-through gowns. A nude woman is shown splashing about in a pool. And the 2013 Cohen Blu-Ray shows what appears to be a woman spreading her knees apart and [[CountryMatters exposing herself]] for the camera. This was in 1916.

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* {{Fanservice}} / FanserviceExtra: The Love Temple in Babylon contains the prince's harem girls, who lounge around in see-through gowns. A nude woman is shown splashing about in a pool. And the 2013 Cohen Blu-Ray shows what appears to be a woman can be seen spreading her knees apart and [[CountryMatters exposing herself]] for the camera. This was in 1916.



* ForDoomTheBellTolls: The tolling of church bells is the signal to start the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre.



* SissyVillain: The prince in the French story.

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* SissyVillain: The prince in the French story.story, who is described as "feminine" and is fully on board with the massacre of Protestants.
7th Sep '16 10:04:10 PM jamespolk
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Added DiffLines:

* DualWielding: One of Prince Belshazzar's best soldiers is known for fighting with two swords at once. He lops off a few Persian heads atop the walls of Babylon.


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* FollowThatCab: Well, it's a silent movie, but the Friendless One grabs a cabbie's attention and points at another cab that is trundling away with the Dear One and the Kindly Officer inside.
6th Sep '16 11:31:49 PM jamespolk
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* TheCameo: Creator/LillianGish, Griffith's regular heroine, appears here only as The Woman Rocking The Cradle in the bits linking the stories.

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* TheCameo: TheCameo:
**
Creator/LillianGish, Griffith's regular heroine, appears here only as The Woman Rocking The Cradle in the bits linking the stories.stories.
** Besides starring as the Mountain Girl, Constance Talmadge appears briefly as Marguerite de Valois in the French story.
6th Sep '16 11:26:31 PM jamespolk
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Added DiffLines:

* GoodSmokingEvilSmoking: The Boy has a cigarette clamped in his mouth when he's working for the Musketeer of the Slums as a hoodlum. He doesn't have one before that, and he never has one after, once the love of the Dear One has redeemed him.


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* ResignationsNotAccepted: The Musketeer will not have it when the Boy tries to quit the criminal life.
16th Aug '16 12:19:31 PM jonnyjames3
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It was made in direct response to D.W. Griffith's previous film, ''Film/TheBirthOfANation''. Reportedly, Griffith had no idea that ''The Birth Of A Nation'' was based off a racist retelling of history until it was pointed out to him, and was horrified at what he had presented and how he was now perceived. However, the film itself is not specifically about race relations.

to:

It was made in direct response to D.W. Griffith's previous film, ''Film/TheBirthOfANation''. Reportedly, Some reports hold that Griffith had no idea that ''The Birth Of A Nation'' was based off a racist retelling of history until it was pointed out to him, and was horrified at what he had presented and how he was now perceived. However, perceived; others (including Website/TheOtherWiki) claim that the movie was conceived in a harsher response to those who were outraged by the aforementioned movie, and that Griffith thought the outrage was an example of Main/PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad. Regardless of what sparked its creation, the film itself is not specifically about race relations.
31st Jul '16 12:57:41 PM jamespolk
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* TheAtoner: Meta-example in Griffith himself. Or so some critics have said, anyway. Others, including silent film historian Kevin Brownlow, have debunked this theory. It is worth noting that the film portrays religious intolerance and class tensions and does not deal with racial intolerance (of the sort on ugly display in ''Film/TheBirthOfANation'') at all. The sole scene with any black people in the film, showing savage "Ethiopians" in the Persian army, suggests that Griffith had not learned any kind of lesson.
12th Jul '16 12:48:46 PM WillKeaton
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''Intolerance'' is a 1916 film, directed by [[Creator/DWGriffith D.W. Griffith]], with four stories about mankind's intolerance. Each story takes place in a separate time and place in world history. Rather than being told sequentially, the film constantly cuts from one story to another, establishing moral and psychological links between all of them -- effectively telling all four stories in parallel.

to:

''Intolerance'' is a 1916 silent film, directed by [[Creator/DWGriffith D.W. Griffith]], with four stories about mankind's intolerance. Each story takes place in a separate time and place in world history. Rather than being told sequentially, the film constantly cuts from one story to another, establishing moral and psychological links between all of them -- effectively telling all four stories in parallel.
11th Mar '16 5:00:52 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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'''''Intolerance''''' is a 1916 film, directed by [[Creator/DWGriffith D.W. Griffith]], with four stories about mankind's intolerance. Each story takes place in a separate time and place in world history. Rather than being told sequentially, the film constantly cuts from one story to another, establishing moral and psychological links between all of them -- effectively telling all four stories in parallel.

to:

'''''Intolerance''''' ''Intolerance'' is a 1916 film, directed by [[Creator/DWGriffith D.W. Griffith]], with four stories about mankind's intolerance. Each story takes place in a separate time and place in world history. Rather than being told sequentially, the film constantly cuts from one story to another, establishing moral and psychological links between all of them -- effectively telling all four stories in parallel.
29th Nov '15 6:37:42 AM gallium
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Added DiffLines:

* FollowTheLeader: The Fall of Babylon story, especially in set design and overall look, bears an obvious debt to 1914 Italian AncientRome EpicMovie ''Film/{{Cabiria}}''.
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