History FantasyGunControl / TableTopGames

6th Apr '16 7:43:01 PM intastiel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Ultimate Combat supplement for Pathfinder spends some time discussing various levels of FantasyGunControl, from 'there aren't even cannons around' to 'Showdown at the Orctown Corral', and noting how they can affect the tenor of the game.

to:

** The Ultimate Combat supplement for Pathfinder spends some time discussing various levels of FantasyGunControl, from 'there aren't even cannons around' to 'Showdown at the Orctown Corral', and noting how they can affect the tenor of the game. The Gunslinger class assumes that early firearms are an emerging technology with the secret of their manufacture just starting to leak out.
1st Mar '16 12:34:00 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' is a notable aversion:

to:

* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' is a has some notable aversion:aversions:
1st Mar '16 12:33:38 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'':
** The Empire and the Dwarfs (''especially'' the Dwarfs) make extensive use of handguns, pistols, cannons, mortars, volley guns, and recently, rockets. Oh, and steam-powered tanks and ''helicopters''. Let's not forget the Skaven, who wield sniper rifles, flamethrowers, [[strike:Gatling]] [[IncrediblyLamePun Ratling]] guns, laser cannons and... a ''nuke''. A lot of which hilariously backfires. However the Knights of Bretonnia have Fantasy Gun Control in their own kingdom. The whole nobility = lancing people down in 5th edition, in 6th seems to just be pique. In fact, they have Fantasy Gun Control in Bretonnia so hard some knights have magical protection from guns just because they hate them so much.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'':
''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' is a notable aversion:
** The Empire and the Dwarfs (''especially'' the Dwarfs) make extensive use of handguns, pistols, cannons, mortars, volley guns, and recently, rockets. Oh, and steam-powered tanks and ''helicopters''. Let's not forget
** Even more notable are
the Skaven, who wield sniper rifles, flamethrowers, [[strike:Gatling]] [[IncrediblyLamePun Ratling]] guns, laser cannons and... a ''nuke''. A lot of which hilariously backfires. However
** However,
the Knights of Bretonnia have are a straight example, since they ''deliberately'' enforce Fantasy Gun Control in their own kingdom. The whole nobility = lancing people down in 5th edition, in 6th seems to just be pique.kingdom. In fact, they have Fantasy Gun Control in Bretonnia so hard some knights have magical protection from guns just because they hate them so much.



** In Warhammer Fantasy Role Play, rules are provided for gunpowder weapons but their use is discouraged by all the limitations put on them - they are extremely rare, extremely expensive both to purchase and to maintain, they are prone to misfires (capable of actually killing the wielder, with a bad roll) and they don't do any more damage than the cheaper and more reliable bow and arrow.
** Amusingly, the Bretonnian supplement for WarhammerFantasyRolePlay gave us a look at the statute decreeing Fantasy Gun Control. [[LoopholeAbuse A strict reading doesn't support a ban on firearms]]. It bans [[ExactWords crossbows]], but it hasn't been updated since the introduction of black powder weaponry, although including black powder weapons in the ban is generally considered within the spirit of the law. However there is a movement in the port city of L'Anguille calling for either a stricter reading or an explicit amendment of the law, so they can openly upgrade the harbour defences with cannon.

to:

** In Warhammer Fantasy Role Play, ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyRoleplay'', rules are provided for gunpowder weapons but their use is discouraged by all the limitations put on them - they are extremely rare, extremely expensive both to purchase and to maintain, they are prone to misfires (capable of actually killing the wielder, with a bad roll) and they don't do any more damage than the cheaper and more reliable bow and arrow.
** *** Amusingly, the Bretonnian supplement for WarhammerFantasyRolePlay gave us a look at the statute decreeing Fantasy Gun Control. [[LoopholeAbuse A strict reading doesn't support a ban on firearms]]. It bans [[ExactWords crossbows]], but it hasn't been updated since the introduction of black powder weaponry, although including black powder weapons in the ban is generally considered within the spirit of the law. However there is a movement in the port city of L'Anguille calling for either a stricter reading or an explicit amendment of the law, so they can openly upgrade the harbour defences with cannon.
6th Feb '16 5:53:10 PM Discar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Played with in ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}''. There's a magical gunpowder equivalent which is used in guns... But there's no projectile. The "guns" just shoot a stream of fire like a miniature flamethrower. The in-canon explanation is that the guns originated during the Primordial War, when the tech-advancement of the Solars would've gone from crossbows to lasers in only a few years.
** In First Edition, there's even a martial art dedicated to the use of these weapons. Second Edition has ''two''. This means you could be badass [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot super-ninja dual-wielding flamethrower-pistols]]. This is standard fare for ''Exalted''.
*** And let's not forget the {{BFG}} of the setting, a shoulder-mounted version that can fire molten-hot pearls covered in magical napalm.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'':
**
Played with in ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}''.with. There's a magical gunpowder equivalent which is used in guns... But there's no projectile. The "guns" just shoot a stream of fire like a miniature flamethrower. The in-canon explanation is that the guns originated during the Primordial War, when the tech-advancement of the Solars would've gone from crossbows to lasers in only a few years.
** In First Edition, there's even a martial art dedicated to the use of these weapons. Second Edition has ''two''. This means you could be badass [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot super-ninja dual-wielding flamethrower-pistols]]. This is standard fare for ''Exalted''.
***
''Exalted''. And let's not forget the {{BFG}} of the setting, a shoulder-mounted version that can fire molten-hot pearls covered in magical napalm.



* Averted in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'': The Empire and the Dwarfs (''especially'' the Dwarfs) make extensive use of handguns, pistols, cannons, mortars, volley guns, and recently, rockets. Oh, and steam-powered tanks and ''helicopters''. Let's not forget the Skaven, who wield sniper rifles, flamethrowers, [[strike:Gatling]] [[IncrediblyLamePun Ratling]] guns, laser cannons and... a ''nuke''. A lot of which hilariously backfires. However the Knights of Bretonnia have Fantasy Gun Control in their own kingdom. The whole nobility = lancing people down in 5th edition, in 6th seems to just be pique. In fact, they have Fantasy Gun Control in Bretonnia so hard some knights have magical protection from guns just because they hate them so much.

to:

* Averted in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'': ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'':
**
The Empire and the Dwarfs (''especially'' the Dwarfs) make extensive use of handguns, pistols, cannons, mortars, volley guns, and recently, rockets. Oh, and steam-powered tanks and ''helicopters''. Let's not forget the Skaven, who wield sniper rifles, flamethrowers, [[strike:Gatling]] [[IncrediblyLamePun Ratling]] guns, laser cannons and... a ''nuke''. A lot of which hilariously backfires. However the Knights of Bretonnia have Fantasy Gun Control in their own kingdom. The whole nobility = lancing people down in 5th edition, in 6th seems to just be pique. In fact, they have Fantasy Gun Control in Bretonnia so hard some knights have magical protection from guns just because they hate them so much.



* The makers of ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' have stated this trope explicitly a number of times, but apparently [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=6499 muskets]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201149 do]] exist in some planes. Also, the [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=33695 Goblin Sharpshooter]] appears to be using some sort of [[GatlingGood Gatling gun]]. And sometimes they go straight to magic ray guns. Guns, nothing. This game has [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=1133 rocket launchers]].

to:

* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'':
**
The makers of ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' have stated this trope explicitly a number of times, but apparently [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=6499 muskets]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201149 do]] exist in some planes. Also, the [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=33695 Goblin Sharpshooter]] appears to be using some sort of [[GatlingGood Gatling gun]]. And sometimes they go straight to magic ray guns. Guns, nothing. This game has [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=1133 rocket launchers]].



*** This became one of the founding pillars of the style of Scars of Mirrodin, where combining with the Machine-ideology of Phyrexia on a wholly metallic plane obviously had the implication that high-tech robots would be running amok, the designers specifically said that while things like armor, gears, levers and pistons can appear, they are to be used so that they are in no way mechanically sound, and must appear as though they're being powered by magic. The result is that most of the inhabitants had high-tech apparatuses used solely to swing around giant blades, and very little way of guns appear.
* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' itself, the 1st edition ''Dungeon Master's Guide'' included in-game statistics for firearms, Gatling guns, dynamite, and other [[TheWildWest Wild West-era]] weapons in the context of a crossover campaign with ''Boot Hill'' (a now out-of-print Old West-themed [=RPG=] sold by [=TSR=] at the time), but it was "strongly urged" that they be limited to specific adventures or areas. ''AD&D'' 2nd edition had the arquebus (an early European musket) available for players to use at the DM's discretion. The 3rd edition Dungeon Master's Guide provided rules for certain "Renaissance" gunpowder weapons, modern and even futuristic firearms and explosives if they are to be included in the setting. Normally they are highly expensive or not buyable at all, however. 5th Edition has again provided stats in the DMG for guns ranging from flintlocks to antimatter rifles.
** The ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' explicitly states that gunpowder does not work due to the divine will of Gond, god of invention and creativity. Instead, Gond allows an alchemical substitute called "smokepowder" to exist in the hands of his church, so that its use is easily controlled. There's also a Thayan variant -- very clumsy bombards using some liquid propellant, not scalable down to portable guns. Also, ''pneumatic'' needle guns were mentioned as a typical trick of drow commoners (''The Drow of the Underdark''): it's easier to conceal than a crossbow. Ed Greenwood even wrote a few articles on this issue (the first being named "Firearms: First guns were [[CoolButInefficient not much fun]]") for DragonMagazine.

to:

*** ** This became one of the founding pillars of the style of Scars of Mirrodin, where combining with the Machine-ideology of Phyrexia on a wholly metallic plane obviously had the implication that high-tech robots would be running amok, the designers specifically said that while things like armor, gears, levers and pistons can appear, they are to be used so that they are in no way mechanically sound, and must appear as though they're being powered by magic. The result is that most of the inhabitants had high-tech apparatuses used solely to swing around giant blades, and very little way of guns appear.
* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' itself, the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
** The
1st edition ''Dungeon Master's Guide'' included in-game statistics for firearms, Gatling guns, dynamite, and other [[TheWildWest Wild West-era]] weapons in the context of a crossover campaign with ''Boot Hill'' (a now out-of-print Old West-themed [=RPG=] sold by [=TSR=] at the time), but it was "strongly urged" that they be limited to specific adventures or areas. ''AD&D'' 2nd edition had the arquebus (an early European musket) available for players to use at the DM's discretion. The 3rd edition Dungeon Master's Guide provided rules for certain "Renaissance" gunpowder weapons, modern and even futuristic firearms and explosives if they are to be included in the setting. Normally they are highly expensive or not buyable at all, however. 5th Edition has again provided stats in the DMG for guns ranging from flintlocks to antimatter rifles.
** ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'':
***
The ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' series explicitly states that gunpowder does not work due to the divine will of Gond, god of invention and creativity. Instead, Gond allows an alchemical substitute called "smokepowder" to exist in the hands of his church, so that its use is easily controlled. There's also a Thayan variant -- very clumsy bombards using some liquid propellant, not scalable down to portable guns. Also, ''pneumatic'' needle guns were mentioned as a typical trick of drow commoners (''The Drow of the Underdark''): it's easier to conceal than a crossbow. Ed Greenwood even wrote a few articles on this issue (the first being named "Firearms: First guns were [[CoolButInefficient not much fun]]") for DragonMagazine.



**** When Cadderly, the central character of Salvatore's ''Cleric Quintet'', invented a crossbow with an exploding bolt (created using the magical substance, oil of impact), he eventually ended up horrified of it. When a villain ended up with it, he became wracked with guilt and was almost convinced it must be destroyed for the good of the world. Particularly jarring as another character points out that said villain is a wizard capable of shooting explosive fireballs from his hands, and that Cadderly's crossbow was terribly weak in comparison. However, he uses it again in ''The Ghost King'', which takes place several years later, against shadowy monsters invading Spirit Soaring, without showing any reservations about it. And later, Jarlaxle, a drow mercenary, gives him the idea to create a much larger explosive bolt using a hollowed out log filled with an explosive substance in order to help them fight an undead dragon.
**** In ''The Thousand Orcs'', Nanfoodle, a gnome alchemist (and follower of Gond) engineered an explosion that proved to be useful against invading frost giants, and, in a later book, it was said to be more powerful than any fireball that even Elminster could have conjured up.
**** In ''The Stowaway'', a novel that he contributed to along with his son, Geno Salvatore, the protagonist notices an arquebus mounted on a wall in the captain's cabin on a ship that he'd just boarded. Later, during a raid the ship, a couple of pirates enter the cabin, grab a hold of the gun, load it with smokepowder, and play around with it (with one pirate taking aim at the other and pulling the trigger), causing a blast that they both manage to survive.

to:

**** *** When Cadderly, the central character of Salvatore's ''Cleric Quintet'', invented a crossbow with an exploding bolt (created using the magical substance, oil of impact), he eventually ended up horrified of it. When a villain ended up with it, he became wracked with guilt and was almost convinced it must be destroyed for the good of the world. Particularly jarring as another character points out that said villain is a wizard capable of shooting explosive fireballs from his hands, and that Cadderly's crossbow was terribly weak in comparison. However, he uses it again in ''The Ghost King'', which takes place several years later, against shadowy monsters invading Spirit Soaring, without showing any reservations about it. And later, Jarlaxle, a drow mercenary, gives him the idea to create a much larger explosive bolt using a hollowed out log filled with an explosive substance in order to help them fight an undead dragon.
**** *** In ''The Thousand Orcs'', Nanfoodle, a gnome alchemist (and follower of Gond) engineered an explosion that proved to be useful against invading frost giants, and, in a later book, it was said to be more powerful than any fireball that even Elminster could have conjured up.
**** *** In ''The Stowaway'', a novel that he contributed to along with his son, Geno Salvatore, the protagonist notices an arquebus mounted on a wall in the captain's cabin on a ship that he'd just boarded. Later, during a raid the ship, a couple of pirates enter the cabin, grab a hold of the gun, load it with smokepowder, and play around with it (with one pirate taking aim at the other and pulling the trigger), causing a blast that they both manage to survive.



**** A couple of anthology stories touch on the subject of smokepowder, both of them making the point that smuggling smokepowder can be more trouble than it's worth. In ''Smoke Powder And Mirrors'' by Jeff Grubb, Khelben himself stands next to exploding barrels of smokepowder and isn't even singed or disheveled. In another Waterdhavian story, one of the contraband-hunting characters receives a ''point-blank [[ShotgunsAreJustBetter blunderbuss shot]] in the face''. He recovers from its flash and thunder in as much time as it takes to say "[[DeflectorShields Protection from Normal Missiles]]".

to:

**** *** A couple of anthology stories touch on the subject of smokepowder, both of them making the point that smuggling smokepowder can be more trouble than it's worth. In ''Smoke Powder And Mirrors'' by Jeff Grubb, Khelben himself stands next to exploding barrels of smokepowder and isn't even singed or disheveled. In another Waterdhavian story, one of the contraband-hunting characters receives a ''point-blank [[ShotgunsAreJustBetter blunderbuss shot]] in the face''. He recovers from its flash and thunder in as much time as it takes to say "[[DeflectorShields Protection from Normal Missiles]]".



* Averted in ''TableTopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'''s official campaign setting. A magically-unstable region is home to blackpowder firearm technology, and maybe some early rifles, revolvers, and shotguns. Another region is a ''ConanTheBarbarian''-style land where an alien spaceship crashed. There you can find androids (available as player characters) and machinegun-toting {{Spider Tank}}s. Other planets in Golarion's solar system have even higher levels of technology, such as cybernetics and more spaceships.

to:

* Averted in ''TableTopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'''s official campaign setting. ''TableTopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'':
**
A magically-unstable region is home to blackpowder firearm technology, and maybe some early rifles, revolvers, and shotguns. Another region is a ''ConanTheBarbarian''-style land where an alien spaceship crashed. There you can find androids (available as player characters) and machinegun-toting {{Spider Tank}}s. Other planets in Golarion's solar system have even higher levels of technology, such as cybernetics and more spaceships.



*** Then the "Reign of Winter" Adventure Path added several WWI-era Russian guns (and a British tank). A later AP, "Iron Gods", takes place in the land with the crashed ship, and necessitated a brand-new sourcebook with technology up to laser weapons.
* Averted in ''TableTopGame/RuneQuest'', to some extent -- although most of the world has approximately Bronze Age technology, the Mostali (Dwarfs) have high-tech superweapons called "guns", which they guard jealously.
** On the other hand this is partially played straight thanks to the dwarves, themselves, as they send ClockworkCreature gremlins to sabotage any human-made technology they deem too dangerous (not to mention automatically assume it has been stolen from them -- and are admittedly right fairly often), ensuring that it will either work badly, or not at all.

to:

*** ** Then the "Reign of Winter" Adventure Path added several WWI-era Russian guns (and a British tank). A later AP, "Iron Gods", takes place in the land with the crashed ship, and necessitated a brand-new sourcebook with technology up to laser weapons.
* Averted in ''TableTopGame/RuneQuest'', to some extent -- although ''TableTopGame/RuneQuest'': Although most of the world has approximately Bronze Age technology, the Mostali (Dwarfs) have high-tech superweapons called "guns", which they guard jealously.
**
jealously. On the other hand this is partially played straight thanks to the dwarves, themselves, as they send ClockworkCreature gremlins to sabotage any human-made technology they deem too dangerous (not to mention automatically assume it has been stolen from them -- and are admittedly right fairly often), ensuring that it will either work badly, or not at all.



* Averted in Swedish tabletop RPG ''Drakar & Demoner'': the ''TabletopGame/{{Chronopia}}'' module mentions large siege cannons made by the dwarves.
** ...but in previous editions of the game, it was specifically noted that using out of character knowledge of the correct proportions of charcoal, nitrate and sulfur would only produce a slow burning fire, as the laws of physics in the game world was different than on earth.

to:

* Averted in Swedish tabletop RPG ''Drakar & Demoner'': the ''TabletopGame/{{Chronopia}}'' module mentions large siege cannons made by the dwarves.
** ...
dwarves. ...but in previous editions of the game, it was specifically noted that using out of character knowledge of the correct proportions of charcoal, nitrate and sulfur would only produce a slow burning fire, as the laws of physics in the game world was different than on earth.
30th Jan '16 11:27:19 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Played with in ''{{Exalted}}''. There's a magical gunpowder equivalent which is used in guns... But there's no projectile. The "guns" just shoot a stream of fire like a miniature flamethrower. The in-canon explanation is that the guns originated during the Primordial War, when the tech-advancement of the Solars would've gone from crossbows to lasers in only a few years.

to:

* Played with in ''{{Exalted}}''.''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}''. There's a magical gunpowder equivalent which is used in guns... But there's no projectile. The "guns" just shoot a stream of fire like a miniature flamethrower. The in-canon explanation is that the guns originated during the Primordial War, when the tech-advancement of the Solars would've gone from crossbows to lasers in only a few years.



* Aversion: The furry Tabletop Game ''{{Ironclaw}}'', which features a Renaissance-era technology level, features guns. They're portrayed with all the limitations guns of that era had: they have a chance to misfire, they're expensive, they have a very long reload time, they can't work well in rain, etc. On the other hand they do twice the damage that other weapons in the system do.

to:

* Aversion: The furry Tabletop Game ''{{Ironclaw}}'', ''TabletopGame/{{Ironclaw}}'', which features a Renaissance-era technology level, features guns. They're portrayed with all the limitations guns of that era had: they have a chance to misfire, they're expensive, they have a very long reload time, they can't work well in rain, etc. On the other hand they do twice the damage that other weapons in the system do.



* Averted in ''IronKingdoms'' the setting makes use of guns for nearly every faction in the ''Warmachine'' game.
* The makers of ''MagicTheGathering'' have stated this trope explicitly a number of times, but apparently [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=6499 muskets]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201149 do]] exist in some planes. Also, the [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=33695 Goblin Sharpshooter]] appears to be using some sort of [[GatlingGood Gatling gun]]. And sometimes they go straight to magic ray guns. Guns, nothing. This game has [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=1133 rocket launchers]].

to:

* Averted in ''IronKingdoms'' ''TabletopGame/IronKingdoms'' the setting makes use of guns for nearly every faction in the ''Warmachine'' game.
* The makers of ''MagicTheGathering'' ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' have stated this trope explicitly a number of times, but apparently [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=6499 muskets]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=201149 do]] exist in some planes. Also, the [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=33695 Goblin Sharpshooter]] appears to be using some sort of [[GatlingGood Gatling gun]]. And sometimes they go straight to magic ray guns. Guns, nothing. This game has [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=1133 rocket launchers]].
15th Jan '16 2:49:46 PM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' setting of ''GURPS Banestorm'' has very literal Fantasy Gun Control, in the form of a conspiracy of wizards who keep the technology suppressed, both through flagrant destruction of stores of gunpowder whenever they're found, and by wiping the minds of anyone with the knowledge of making it.

to:

* The ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' setting of ''GURPS Banestorm'' ''TabletopGame/{{Banestorm}}'' has very literal Fantasy Gun Control, in the form of a conspiracy of wizards who keep the technology suppressed, both through flagrant destruction of stores of gunpowder whenever they're found, and by wiping the minds of anyone with the knowledge of making it.
15th Jan '16 6:13:13 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''{{GURPS}}'' setting of ''GURPS Banestorm'' has very literal Fantasy Gun Control, in the form of a conspiracy of wizards who keep the technology suppressed, both through flagrant destruction of stores of gunpowder whenever they're found, and by wiping the minds of anyone with the knowledge of making it.
* TheFantasyTrip book "In The Labyrinth" includes descriptions of several types of primitive gunpowder weapons. Some of them can deal a lot of damage. However, gunpowder is expensive and unreliable, and guns are unwieldy in combat, meaning most characters stick with muscle-powered weapons (or magic).

to:

* The ''{{GURPS}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' setting of ''GURPS Banestorm'' has very literal Fantasy Gun Control, in the form of a conspiracy of wizards who keep the technology suppressed, both through flagrant destruction of stores of gunpowder whenever they're found, and by wiping the minds of anyone with the knowledge of making it.
* TheFantasyTrip TabletopGame/TheFantasyTrip book "In The Labyrinth" includes descriptions of several types of primitive gunpowder weapons. Some of them can deal a lot of damage. However, gunpowder is expensive and unreliable, and guns are unwieldy in combat, meaning most characters stick with muscle-powered weapons (or magic).
8th Nov '15 5:43:36 PM MattStriker
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* So far in ''TabletopGame/KingsOfWar'' the only factions that use gun powder weapons are the Dwarfs and Abyssal Dwarfs. The Dwarfs possess rifles and cannons as common weapons, while the Abyssal Dwarfs combine alchemy and dark magic with their weapons.

to:

* So far in ''TabletopGame/KingsOfWar'' the only factions that use gun powder weapons are the Dwarfs and Abyssal Dwarfs. The Dwarfs possess rifles and cannons as common weapons, while the Abyssal Dwarfs combine alchemy and dark magic with their weapons.weapons.
* In ''TabletopGame/TheDarkEye'' black powder is known and used for fireworks. Military use is made impossible by the fact that larger concentrations of the stuff attract mischievous fire spirits, although the dwarves are rumored to have found a way around that problem and may be stockpiling firearms for their version of Ragnarok.
20th Aug '15 10:55:34 PM direguy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Averted in Swedish tabletop RPG ''Drakar & Demoner'': the ''Chronopia'' module mentions large siege cannons made by the dwarves.
** ...but in previous editions of the game, it was specifically noted that using out of character knowlege of the correct proportions of charcoal, nitrate and sulphur would only produce a slow burning fire, as the laws of physics in the game world was different than on earth.

to:

* Averted in Swedish tabletop RPG ''Drakar & Demoner'': the ''Chronopia'' ''TabletopGame/{{Chronopia}}'' module mentions large siege cannons made by the dwarves.
** ...but in previous editions of the game, it was specifically noted that using out of character knowlege knowledge of the correct proportions of charcoal, nitrate and sulphur sulfur would only produce a slow burning fire, as the laws of physics in the game world was different than on earth.
3rd Aug '15 5:16:15 AM Divra
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Amusingly, the Bretonnian supplement for WarhammerFantasyRolePlay gave us a look at the statute decreeing Fantasy Gun Control. [[LoopholeAbuse A strict reading doesn't support a ban on firearms]]. It bans [[ExactWords crossbows]], but it hadn't been updated since the introduction of black powder weaponry, although such a ban would be within the spirit of the law. There is, in fact, a movement in the port city of L'Anguille laying the groundwork for a call for either a stricter reading, or explicit amendment of the law, so they can openly upgrade the harbour defences with cannon.

to:

** Amusingly, the Bretonnian supplement for WarhammerFantasyRolePlay gave us a look at the statute decreeing Fantasy Gun Control. [[LoopholeAbuse A strict reading doesn't support a ban on firearms]]. It bans [[ExactWords crossbows]], but it hadn't hasn't been updated since the introduction of black powder weaponry, although such a including black powder weapons in the ban would be is generally considered within the spirit of the law. There is, in fact, However there is a movement in the port city of L'Anguille laying the groundwork for a call calling for either a stricter reading, reading or an explicit amendment of the law, so they can openly upgrade the harbour defences with cannon.
This list shows the last 10 events of 37. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=FantasyGunControl.TableTopGames