History Fanon / ComicBooks

7th Aug '16 10:11:31 AM nombretomado
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* A TabletopGames tie-in for TheDCU placed [[Franchise/{{Batman}} Gotham City]] in New Jersey and [[{{Superman}} Metropolis]] in Delaware, but these details are never mentioned in any comic books despite numerous fans accepting it as fact. Metropolis has also been described (if only in our world) as New York in the day and Gotham City as New York at night, but that's for poetic reasons; New York exists as a separate entity.

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* A TabletopGames tie-in for TheDCU Franchise/TheDCU placed [[Franchise/{{Batman}} Gotham City]] in New Jersey and [[{{Superman}} Metropolis]] in Delaware, but these details are never mentioned in any comic books despite numerous fans accepting it as fact. Metropolis has also been described (if only in our world) as New York in the day and Gotham City as New York at night, but that's for poetic reasons; New York exists as a separate entity.
25th Mar '16 8:18:56 PM Tholomyes
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** Based on the art (and/or tone) of the first two, they have either a subtext or implication of rape. In Uncanny X-men 236, Rogue is in a Genoshan Cell, depowered and crying, where the guard explains to her superior "I'm afraid some of my officers took a few... liberties when she was being processed. What they thought was fun, she evidently felt was something else. Those responsible have been disciplined. It won't happen again." It is very heavily implied to have been some form of sexual assault, and while the rape implication is unclear, it is not outside the textual basis. Likewise, while The Killing Joke's textual implications of rape are not as overt, the tone of the writing and art are very evocative of how rape is often portrayed in media. So while it is clearer from the text that she was probably not raped, the tone of her appearance in the story was very much one of rape. While [[WordOfGod]] confirms that they were not raped, there is still textual evidence to support that theory, with the possible explanation that the ambiguity made it easier for the writers to turn the implication of rape into something else (though sexual assault and/or traumatic violence is still implied or overt).

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** Based on the art (and/or tone) of the first two, they have either a subtext or implication of rape. In Uncanny X-men 236, Rogue is in a Genoshan Cell, depowered and crying, where the guard explains to her superior "I'm afraid some of my officers took a few... liberties when she was being processed. What they thought was fun, she evidently felt was something else. Those responsible have been disciplined. It won't happen again." It is very heavily implied to have been some form of sexual assault, and while the rape implication is unclear, it is not outside the textual basis. Likewise, while The Killing Joke's textual implications of rape are not as overt, the tone of the writing and art are very evocative of how rape is often portrayed in media. So while it is clearer from the text that she was probably not raped, the tone of her appearance in the story was very much one of rape. While [[WordOfGod]] WordOfGod confirms that they were not raped, there is still textual evidence to support that theory, with the possible explanation that the ambiguity made it easier for the writers to turn the implication of rape into something else (though sexual assault and/or traumatic violence is still implied or overt).
25th Mar '16 8:18:16 PM Tholomyes
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** Based on the art (and/or tone) of the first two, they have either a subtext or implication of rape. In Uncanny X-men 236, Rogue is in a Genoshan Cell, depowered and crying, where the guard explains to her superior "I'm afraid some of my officers took a few... liberties when she was being processed. What they thought was fun, she evidently felt was something else. Those responsible have been disciplined. It won't happen again." It is very heavily implied to have been some form of sexual assault, and while the rape implication is unclear, it is not outside the textual basis. Likewise, while The Killing Joke's textual implications of rape are not as overt, the tone of the writing and art are very evocative of how rape is often portrayed in media. So while it is clearer from the text that she was probably not raped, the tone of her appearance in the story was very much one of rape. While [[Word of God]] confirms that they were not raped, there is still textual evidence to support that theory, with the possible explanation that the ambiguity made it easier for the writers to turn the implication of rape into something else (though sexual assault and/or traumatic violence is still implied or overt).

to:

** Based on the art (and/or tone) of the first two, they have either a subtext or implication of rape. In Uncanny X-men 236, Rogue is in a Genoshan Cell, depowered and crying, where the guard explains to her superior "I'm afraid some of my officers took a few... liberties when she was being processed. What they thought was fun, she evidently felt was something else. Those responsible have been disciplined. It won't happen again." It is very heavily implied to have been some form of sexual assault, and while the rape implication is unclear, it is not outside the textual basis. Likewise, while The Killing Joke's textual implications of rape are not as overt, the tone of the writing and art are very evocative of how rape is often portrayed in media. So while it is clearer from the text that she was probably not raped, the tone of her appearance in the story was very much one of rape. While [[Word of God]] [[WordOfGod]] confirms that they were not raped, there is still textual evidence to support that theory, with the possible explanation that the ambiguity made it easier for the writers to turn the implication of rape into something else (though sexual assault and/or traumatic violence is still implied or overt).
25th Mar '16 8:17:09 PM Tholomyes
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Added DiffLines:

**Based on the art (and/or tone) of the first two, they have either a subtext or implication of rape. In Uncanny X-men 236, Rogue is in a Genoshan Cell, depowered and crying, where the guard explains to her superior "I'm afraid some of my officers took a few... liberties when she was being processed. What they thought was fun, she evidently felt was something else. Those responsible have been disciplined. It won't happen again." It is very heavily implied to have been some form of sexual assault, and while the rape implication is unclear, it is not outside the textual basis. Likewise, while The Killing Joke's textual implications of rape are not as overt, the tone of the writing and art are very evocative of how rape is often portrayed in media. So while it is clearer from the text that she was probably not raped, the tone of her appearance in the story was very much one of rape. While [[Word of God]] confirms that they were not raped, there is still textual evidence to support that theory, with the possible explanation that the ambiguity made it easier for the writers to turn the implication of rape into something else (though sexual assault and/or traumatic violence is still implied or overt).
15th Mar '16 4:06:08 AM Pichu-kun
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* Female characters that were savagely beaten and hurt in canon will have been raped according to fanon. Perhaps this is because RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil or people do not understand why a hero being hurt is such a big deal. Some examples of this include Rogue when she was depowered in Genosha, ComicBook/{{Batgirl}} (Barbara Gordon) when she was attacked and crippled by the Joker in ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', and ComicBook/BlackCanary being beaten by a gang in ''TheLongbowHunters'' (this is often due to fans being confused why she ended up infertile). Word of God has confirmed none of them were raped.

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* Female characters that were savagely beaten and hurt in canon will have been raped according to fanon. Perhaps this is because RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil or people do not understand why a hero being hurt is such a big deal. Some examples of this include Rogue when she was depowered in Genosha, ComicBook/{{Batgirl}} (Barbara Gordon) when she was attacked and crippled by the Joker in ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', and ComicBook/BlackCanary being beaten by a gang in ''TheLongbowHunters'' ''The Longbow Hunters'' (this is often due to fans being confused why she ended up infertile). Word of God has confirmed none of them were raped.
15th Mar '16 4:05:16 AM Pichu-kun
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** A particularly odd example is the belief that in ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', Barbara Gordon was shot in the vagina. Despite the art clearly showing her being shot in the stomach, and the fact that being shot any lower than that wouldn't have caused her the spinal damage that resulted from the attack.
*** One result of Babs's disability, is that she could not have children anymore; perhaps that had something to do with it? It probably doesn't help that the whole attack is presented much like a rape.

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** A particularly odd example is the belief that in ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', Barbara Gordon was shot in the vagina. Despite the art clearly showing her being shot in the stomach, and the fact that being shot any lower than that wouldn't have caused her the spinal damage that resulted from the attack.
***
attack. One result of Babs's disability, is that she could not have children anymore; perhaps that had something to do with it? It probably doesn't help that the whole attack is presented much like a rape.rape.
** Despite WordOfGod insisting otherwise, Barbara being raped in ''The Killing Joke'' is a common fanon.
** Batman killed the Joker at the end of ''The Killing Joke''. This is an explanation for the odd ending where the two are laughing together. Supporter believe Batman strangled him in rage. Originally the comic was an out-of-continuity comic but it was made canon, and obviously the Joker didn't die, so the theory isn't canon but it still pops up frequently.



* Female characters that were savagely beaten and hurt in canon will have been raped according to fanon. Perhaps this is because RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil or people do not understand why a hero being hurt is such a big deal. Some examples of this include Rogue when she was depowered in Genosha, Batgirl (Barbara Gordon) when she was attacked and crippled by the Joker in ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', and Black Canary being beaten by a gang in ''TheLongbowHunters''. Word of God has confirmed none of them were raped.
** Gwen Stacy is an interesting example because canon wise she was a short tempered {{Tsundere}} that ReallyGetsAround and was continually trying to seduce Peter because he was not interested in her, despite the fact that during that time she was dating Flash Thompson and later Harry Osborn. After she began dating Peter she developed into a truly caring girlfriend. After she was killed by the Green Goblin Fanon disregarded her history and turned her into a PuritySue Virgin and claimed that it was impossible that she would ever sleep with a man despite the fact she had early on claimed to have slept with every man she knew.

to:

* Female characters that were savagely beaten and hurt in canon will have been raped according to fanon. Perhaps this is because RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil or people do not understand why a hero being hurt is such a big deal. Some examples of this include Rogue when she was depowered in Genosha, Batgirl ComicBook/{{Batgirl}} (Barbara Gordon) when she was attacked and crippled by the Joker in ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', and Black Canary ComicBook/BlackCanary being beaten by a gang in ''TheLongbowHunters''.''TheLongbowHunters'' (this is often due to fans being confused why she ended up infertile). Word of God has confirmed none of them were raped.
** * Gwen Stacy is an interesting example because canon wise she was a short tempered {{Tsundere}} that ReallyGetsAround and was continually trying to seduce Peter because he was not interested in her, despite the fact that during that time she was dating Flash Thompson and later Harry Osborn. After she began dating Peter she developed into a truly caring girlfriend. After she was killed by the Green Goblin Fanon disregarded her history and turned her into a PuritySue Virgin and claimed that it was impossible that she would ever sleep with a man despite the fact she had early on claimed to have slept with every man she knew.




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* ''Franchise/ArchieComics'':
** Jughead is either gay (and possibly in love with Archie) or {{asexual}}. The latter is AscendedFanon as of ''ComicBook/ArchieComics2015''.
** Fans lean heavily towards Betty/Archie being the OfficialCouple. Veronica is rarely treated as too seriously a love interest.
15th Jan '16 4:48:57 PM nombretomado
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*** The first two things can be explained by the fact that most of Russian fans of X-Men first got acquainted with them via ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'', where in dub Gambit indeed was called Creole quite often and constantly tried to charm some casual girls. {{Wolverine}}'s not getting the same treatment may be connected to the fact that his [[GirlOfTheWeek Girls Of The Week]] usually played a significant part in the episode's plot and he didn't play up his "ladies' man" image. Two latter seem to be a result of the huge influence of the first generation fans.
* People have noted that SquirrelGirl's [[LethalJokeCharacter victories against villains]] [[DidYouJustFlipOffCthulhu far stronger]] [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu than her]] is due to her PlotArmor only working in proportion in how strong her foes are, thus she'd lose if she met regular mooks. However, if you'd ask the Bug-Eyed Voice and examined [[GroinAttack the nuts]] of one of the mooks which were defeated by her in GLA Issue #2 you'd notice that she is still overpowered against normal mooks who run screaming from "the bringer of Anti-Life!".

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*** The first two things can be explained by the fact that most of Russian fans of X-Men first got acquainted with them via ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'', ''WesternAnimation/XMen'', where in dub Gambit indeed was called Creole quite often and constantly tried to charm some casual girls. {{Wolverine}}'s not getting the same treatment may be connected to the fact that his [[GirlOfTheWeek Girls Of The Week]] usually played a significant part in the episode's plot and he didn't play up his "ladies' man" image. Two latter seem to be a result of the huge influence of the first generation fans.
* People have noted that SquirrelGirl's ComicBook/SquirrelGirl's [[LethalJokeCharacter victories against villains]] [[DidYouJustFlipOffCthulhu far stronger]] [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu than her]] is due to her PlotArmor only working in proportion in how strong her foes are, thus she'd lose if she met regular mooks. However, if you'd ask the Bug-Eyed Voice and examined [[GroinAttack the nuts]] of one of the mooks which were defeated by her in GLA Issue #2 you'd notice that she is still overpowered against normal mooks who run screaming from "the bringer of Anti-Life!".
15th Sep '15 8:45:30 PM nombretomado
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** [[CrisisOnInfiniteEarths Pre-Crisis]], Metropolis was sometimes stated to be on the East Coast, sometimes in the Midwest, and sometimes even on the West Coast.

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** [[CrisisOnInfiniteEarths [[ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths Pre-Crisis]], Metropolis was sometimes stated to be on the East Coast, sometimes in the Midwest, and sometimes even on the West Coast.
12th May '15 2:14:19 PM nombretomado
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* Many recent revivals of [[TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] public domain comic book superheroes wind up incorporating [[AscendedFanon fanon into canon]] because, well, Golden Age comic books are hard to find, leaving writers no choice but to rely on character profiles found throughout the Internet. Many of those profiles have at least some fanon. In fairness, [[TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] comics were never big on continuity, so lots of this fanon comes from attempts to reconcile contradictory details and justify things that just plain didn't make sense.

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* Many recent revivals of [[TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] public domain comic book superheroes wind up incorporating [[AscendedFanon fanon into canon]] because, well, Golden Age comic books are hard to find, leaving writers no choice but to rely on character profiles found throughout the Internet. Many of those profiles have at least some fanon. In fairness, [[TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] comics were never big on continuity, so lots of this fanon comes from attempts to reconcile contradictory details and justify things that just plain didn't make sense.
23rd Mar '15 12:18:27 PM nombretomado
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* Much like River from ''{{Firefly}}'', Gambit often refers to himself in the [[ThirdPersonPerson third person]] in fanfiction. This happened rarely if at all in the comics. This might, however, have stemmed from the ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' cartoon of the '90s, in which Gambit did this quite often.

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* Much like River from ''{{Firefly}}'', ''{{Series/Firefly}}'', Gambit often refers to himself in the [[ThirdPersonPerson third person]] in fanfiction. This happened rarely if at all in the comics. This might, however, have stemmed from the ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' cartoon of the '90s, in which Gambit did this quite often.
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