History DorkAge / Sports

26th Apr '16 9:24:56 PM KYCubbie
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** Liverpool is currently experiencing one: Having been a Top 4 team in England (considered by many to have the best league in the world; that is saying something) for a long while, they finished 7th in the 2009 - 10 season and needed a late surge under new manager (and club legend) Kenny Danglish to finish sixth the following year. That and awful cup performances just made the club's 2005 Champions League victory seem like a distant memory for a lot of supporters; however, the club's second place finish in 2014, just two points behind champion Manchester City, may be a sign that the Dork Age is at an end.

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** Liverpool is currently experiencing one: Having been a Top 4 team in England (considered by many to have the best league in the world; that is saying something) for a long while, they finished 7th in the 2009 - 10 season and needed a late surge under new manager (and club legend) Kenny Danglish Dalglish to finish sixth the following year. That and awful cup performances just made the club's 2005 Champions League victory seem like a distant memory for a lot of supporters; however, the club's second place finish in 2014, just two points behind champion Manchester City, may be a sign that the Dork Age is at an end.



*** First, in 1960, Charlie Finley bought the then-UsefulNotes/KansasCity Athletics from the estate of Arnold Johnson, who had moved the team from UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} after the 1954 season. Johnson was widely accused of operating the A's as an effective Yankees farm club, allegedly allowing the Yankees to develop their young talent in a major-league environment before getting the players back in sweetheart deals.[[note]]Historic evidence for this is sketchy, but it is known that under MLB rules of that day, the Yankees held the major-league rights to Kansas City, since their top farm club had been based in that city. The Yankees moved the minor-league team to UsefulNotes/{{Denver}}, and didn't ask for one cent of the large indemnity they could have demanded.[[/note]] Finley immediately stopped the "special relationship" between the A's and Yankees.

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*** First, in 1960, Charlie Finley bought the then-UsefulNotes/KansasCity Athletics from the estate of Arnold Johnson, who had moved the team from UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} after the 1954 season. Johnson was widely accused of operating the A's as an effective Yankees farm club, allegedly allowing the Yankees to develop their young talent in a major-league environment before getting the players back in sweetheart deals.[[note]]Historic evidence for this is sketchy, but it is known that under MLB rules of that day, the Yankees held the major-league rights to Kansas City, since their top farm club had been based in that city. The Yankees moved the minor-league team to UsefulNotes/{{Denver}}, and didn't ask for one cent of the large indemnity they could have demanded.[[/note]] Finley immediately stopped ended the "special relationship" between the A's and Yankees.
26th Apr '16 9:23:13 PM KYCubbie
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* American UsefulNotes/{{baseball}} in general went through a DorkAge in TheFifties, as the only place where the sport ''wasn't'' in a sorry state was UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity. The minor leagues were collapsing due to the availability of major league games on television, old stadiums were growing increasingly decrepit, the dominance of New York teams (particularly the Yankees)[[note]]Of the ten World Series held in the '50s, eight were won by teams from New York, and only the last one of these, in 1959, did not feature at least one NYC team. The only years when this wasn't the case were 1957, when the UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} Braves beat the Yankees, and 1959, when the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers beat the UsefulNotes/Chicago White Sox -- and just two years earlier, the L.A. team had been the ''Brooklyn'' Dodgers.[[/note]] was causing fans outside New York to tune out, some teams were still refusing to integrate long after UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson had broken down the color barrier, and the sport had no real presence (other than the aforementioned minor leagues) in the fast-growing "Sun Belt" of the South and the West Coast. All of this gave [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]], both professional and [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball college-level]], enough room to build itself up as a serious rival to baseball's status as "America's pastime." This ended in TheSixties once teams (led by the Giants and the Dodgers) started moving to the South and West and giving the sport a real nationwide presence, along with the Yankees' own DorkAge meaning that other teams (especially in the American League) now stood a chance.\\

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* American UsefulNotes/{{baseball}} in general went through a DorkAge in TheFifties, as the only place where the sport ''wasn't'' in a sorry state was UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity. The minor leagues were collapsing due to the availability of major league games on television, old stadiums were growing increasingly decrepit, the dominance of New York teams (particularly the Yankees)[[note]]Of the ten World Series held in the '50s, eight were won by teams from New York, and only the last one of these, in 1959, did not feature at least one NYC team. The only years when this wasn't the case were 1957, when the UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} Braves beat the Yankees, and 1959, when the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers beat the UsefulNotes/Chicago UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} White Sox -- and just two years earlier, the L.A. team had been the ''Brooklyn'' Dodgers.[[/note]] was causing fans outside New York to tune out, some teams were still refusing to integrate long after UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson had broken down the color barrier, and the sport had no real presence (other than the aforementioned minor leagues) in the fast-growing "Sun Belt" of the South and the West Coast. All of this gave [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]], both professional and [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball college-level]], enough room to build itself up as a serious rival to baseball's status as "America's pastime." This ended in TheSixties once teams (led by the Giants and the Dodgers) started moving to the South and West and giving the sport a real nationwide presence, along with the Yankees' own DorkAge meaning that other teams (especially in the American League) now stood a chance.\\
26th Apr '16 9:22:32 PM KYCubbie
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* The 1990 FIFAWorldCup, filled with ties, underperforming teams (both [[UsefulNotes/EuroFooty European champions]] Netherlands and perpetual favorites Brazil fell in the first round of the playoffs) and low goalscoring. Rule changes were imposed afterwards to improve the game (forbidding the keeper from handling the ball, preventing time-wasting and defensiveness; 3 points for win instead of 2 to disencourage ties).
* The Domenech era (post-2006) is considered like this for the French national soccer team. France fell during the pool phase both in 2008 and 2010 ; the 2010 World Cup was marked by many scandals (players' strike, insults, match against Ireland...) which greatly affected the team's reputation.

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* The 1990 FIFAWorldCup, [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup FIFA World Cup]], filled with ties, underperforming teams (both [[UsefulNotes/EuroFooty European champions]] Netherlands and perpetual favorites Brazil fell in the first round of the playoffs) and low goalscoring. Rule changes were imposed afterwards to improve the game (forbidding the keeper from handling the ball, preventing time-wasting and defensiveness; 3 points for a win instead of 2 to disencourage ties).
discourage draws).
* The Domenech era (post-2006) (2006–2010) is considered like this for the French national soccer team. France fell during the pool phase both in 2008 and 2010 ; 2010; the 2010 World Cup was marked by many scandals (players' strike, insults, match against Ireland...) which greatly affected the team's reputation.



** 1972--1978, comprising the latter two years of World Cup-winning manager Sir Alf Ramsey's tenure as manager, and the entirety of Don Revie's term. The team failed to qualify for ''any'' tournament during this period, resulting in Ramsey being sacked, and Revie's tenure ending in disgrace when he agreed to take over as manager of the United Arab Emirates' national team while still contracted to England, earning him a lifetime ban from football in his home country. On top of that, hooliganism started to become a major problem at England internationals.

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** 1972--1978, 1972–1978, comprising the latter two years of World Cup-winning manager Sir Alf Ramsey's tenure as manager, and the entirety of Don Revie's term. The team failed to qualify for ''any'' tournament during this period, resulting in Ramsey being sacked, and Revie's tenure ending in disgrace when he agreed to take over as manager of the United Arab Emirates' national team while still contracted to England, earning him a lifetime ban from football in his home country. On top of that, hooliganism started to become a major problem at England internationals.



** Steve [=McClaren's=] tenure as England manager from 2006--07. A few good results in the first few Euro 2008 qualifiers soon gave way to failures to beat sides that they were easily beating under Eriksson, and what was widely regarded as England's worst-ever result when they needed a late goal to defeat ''Andorra'', the second-smallest country in UEFA. A couple of late wins and some freak results elsewhere gave England going into their final game... which instead resulted in the image of [=McClaren=] standing forlorn on the pitchside, holding a comically oversized umbrella and watching haplessly as his team was taken apart by Croatia. England failed to qualify, and [=McClaren=] was sacked the next morning, with a near-universal reputation as the single worst England manager ever.
* If the Cleveland Browns were European and played soccer, they might be the 1.FC Nürnberg. One of the finest teams of the 1920s and still pretty damn good up to the 1968 championship (their ninth), they managed to do what no team had done before or done since - they were relegated as reigning champions. The years after that were painful attempts to get back into the first division, which they only managed once they had given up on it - only to get relegated promptly thereafter. They proceeded to buy players that - as 1968 coach Max Merkel observed - would not be worth the price a butcher would ask for them and proceeded to humiliate and embarrass their fans in every way possible, despite a brief respite in the 1980s when a young team made it to the Uefa Cup and the DFB-Cup final (which they lost to Bayern München). However, in 2007 the team seemed to have finally caught a break. Lead by beloved coach Hans Meyer, they made it to the Cup Final and won it this time. With a bright future ahead, a team was assembled that could tackle the European games to come.... Only to manage something which has ''also'' not been done by any other German team before or since: They were relegated as reigning cup champions. Solid works boys, solid work. Basically everything since (and including) 1969 has been a giant dork age and unlike other examples, their seems to be just no end in sight. Fans have taken to the phrase "Der Glubb is a Debb - Aber ich mooch nan" [[note]]dialect for: The Club (Nuremberg is often referred to as simply "Der Club" which in Franconia is prononuced with a G) is an idiot - but I still love it[[/note]]

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** Steve [=McClaren's=] tenure as England manager from 2006--07.2006–07. A few good results in the first few Euro 2008 qualifiers soon gave way to failures to beat sides that they were easily beating under Eriksson, and what was widely regarded as England's worst-ever result when they needed a late goal to defeat ''Andorra'', the second-smallest country in UEFA. A couple of late wins and some freak results elsewhere gave England going into their final game... which instead resulted in the image of [=McClaren=] standing forlorn on the pitchside, holding a comically oversized umbrella and watching haplessly as his team was taken apart by Croatia. England failed to qualify, and [=McClaren=] was sacked the next morning, with a near-universal reputation as the single worst England manager ever.
* If the Cleveland Browns were European and played soccer, they might be the 1.FC Nürnberg. One of the finest teams of the 1920s and still pretty damn good up to the 1968 championship (their ninth), they managed to do what no team had done before or done since - they were relegated as reigning champions. The years after that were painful attempts to get back into the first division, which they only managed once they had given up on it - only to get relegated promptly thereafter. They proceeded to buy players that - as 1968 coach Max Merkel observed - would not be worth the price a butcher would ask for them and proceeded to humiliate and embarrass their fans in every way possible, despite a brief respite in the 1980s when a young team made it to the Uefa UEFA Cup and the DFB-Cup final (which they lost to Bayern München). However, in 2007 the team seemed to have finally caught a break. Lead by beloved coach Hans Meyer, they made it to the Cup Final and won it this time. With a bright future ahead, a team was assembled that could tackle the European games to come.... Only to manage something which has ''also'' not been done by any other German team before or since: They were relegated as reigning cup champions. Solid works work boys, solid work. Basically everything since (and including) 1969 has been a giant dork age and unlike other examples, their there seems to be just no end in sight. Fans have taken to the phrase "Der Glubb is a Debb - Aber ich mooch nan" [[note]]dialect for: The Club (Nuremberg is often referred to as simply "Der Club" which in Franconia is prononuced with a G) is an idiot - but I still love it[[/note]]



* American UsefulNotes/{{baseball}} in general went through a DorkAge in TheFifties, as the only place where the sport ''wasn't'' in a sorry state was UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity. The minor leagues were collapsing due to the availability of major league games on television, old stadiums were growing increasingly decrepit, the dominance of New York teams (particularly the Yankees)[[note]]Of the ten World Series held in the '50s, eight were won by teams from New York. The only years when this wasn't the case were 1957, when the UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} Braves pulled it off, and 1959, when the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers won -- and just two years earlier, they had been the ''Brooklyn'' Dodgers.[[/note]] was causing fans outside New York to tune out, some teams were still refusing to integrate long after Jackie Robinson had broken down the color barrier, and the sport had no real presence (other than the aforementioned minor leagues) in the fast-growing "Sun Belt" of the South and the West Coast. All of this gave [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]], both professional and [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball college-level]], enough room to build itself up as a serious rival to baseball's status as "America's pastime." This ended in TheSixties once teams (led by the Giants and the Dodgers) started moving to the South and West and giving the sport a real nationwide presence, along with the Yankees' own DorkAge meaning that other teams (especially in the American League) now stood a chance.\\

to:

* American UsefulNotes/{{baseball}} in general went through a DorkAge in TheFifties, as the only place where the sport ''wasn't'' in a sorry state was UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity. The minor leagues were collapsing due to the availability of major league games on television, old stadiums were growing increasingly decrepit, the dominance of New York teams (particularly the Yankees)[[note]]Of the ten World Series held in the '50s, eight were won by teams from New York. York, and only the last one of these, in 1959, did not feature at least one NYC team. The only years when this wasn't the case were 1957, when the UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} Braves pulled it off, beat the Yankees, and 1959, when the UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers won beat the UsefulNotes/Chicago White Sox -- and just two years earlier, they the L.A. team had been the ''Brooklyn'' Dodgers.[[/note]] was causing fans outside New York to tune out, some teams were still refusing to integrate long after Jackie Robinson UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson had broken down the color barrier, and the sport had no real presence (other than the aforementioned minor leagues) in the fast-growing "Sun Belt" of the South and the West Coast. All of this gave [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]], both professional and [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball college-level]], enough room to build itself up as a serious rival to baseball's status as "America's pastime." This ended in TheSixties once teams (led by the Giants and the Dodgers) started moving to the South and West and giving the sport a real nationwide presence, along with the Yankees' own DorkAge meaning that other teams (especially in the American League) now stood a chance.\\



** Starting in 1964, the Yankees' long-running '50s dynasty quickly collapsed. While some have blamed Creator/{{CBS}} [[ScapegoatCreator buying a controlling stake in the team]], the biggest factor in their decline was the introduction of the MLB draft in 1965, making it much harder for the Yankees to replace their aging '50s superstars by [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney simply buying up every hot young talent]]. The Yankees finished 1965 in the second division (i.e. in the bottom half of the standings), and the following year they finished dead last in the American League. Longtime announcer and "Voice of the Yankees" Mel Allen was also fired in 1964 to save money. Things got slightly better in the ensuing years, but it was only when George Steinbrenner took over the team in 1973 that it became a contender again.

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** Starting in 1964, the Yankees' long-running '50s dynasty quickly collapsed. While some have blamed Creator/{{CBS}} [[ScapegoatCreator buying a controlling stake in the team]], the biggest factor there were two major factors in their decline decline.
*** First, in 1960, Charlie Finley bought the then-UsefulNotes/KansasCity Athletics from the estate of Arnold Johnson, who had moved the team from UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} after the 1954 season. Johnson
was widely accused of operating the A's as an effective Yankees farm club, allegedly allowing the Yankees to develop their young talent in a major-league environment before getting the players back in sweetheart deals.[[note]]Historic evidence for this is sketchy, but it is known that under MLB rules of that day, the Yankees held the major-league rights to Kansas City, since their top farm club had been based in that city. The Yankees moved the minor-league team to UsefulNotes/{{Denver}}, and didn't ask for one cent of the large indemnity they could have demanded.[[/note]] Finley immediately stopped the "special relationship" between the A's and Yankees.
*** The ''coup de grace'' was delivered in 1965 with
the introduction of the MLB draft in 1965, draft, making it much even harder for the Yankees to replace their aging '50s superstars by [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney simply buying up every hot young talent]]. The Yankees finished 1965 in the second division (i.e. in the bottom half of the standings), and the following year they finished dead last in the American League. Longtime announcer and "Voice of the Yankees" Mel Allen was also fired in 1964 to save money. Things got slightly better in the ensuing years, but it was only when George Steinbrenner took over the team in 1973 that it became a contender again.



** 1990 started off with a lockout that cut into much of Spring Training. Fay Vincent, who became the commissioner after the sudden death of A. Bartlett Giamatti in September 1989 and oversaw the lockout, was forced out of office by the owners (among them, Milwaukee Brewers owner Bud Selig, who would subsequently replace Vincent as commissioner, albeit on an "acting basis" at first) two years later.

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** 1990 started off with a lockout that cut into much of Spring Training. Fay Vincent, who became the commissioner after the sudden death of A. Bartlett Giamatti Giamatti[[note]]father of actors Creator/{{Paul|Giamatti}} and Marcus Giamatti[[/note]] in September 1989 and oversaw the lockout, was forced out of office by the owners (among them, Milwaukee Brewers owner Bud Selig, who would subsequently replace Vincent as commissioner, albeit on an "acting basis" at first) two years later.



** For what it's worth, though, it was under Disney's ownership that the Angels built the team that won the World Series in 2002. While many fans cheered the Mouse-Ears selling to Arte Moreno that year, Moreno has since wrecked the team by trying to make them the Yankees of the West Coast, giving the front office the edict to always sign the best player in free agency each year (in addition to the debacle over the city of Anaheim suing the team to keep their name with the team, forcing them to now be called the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim). This has led to them dumping proven veterans like Vlad Guererro and Torri Hunter in order to eventually sign expensive contracts with declining superstars like Albert Pujols and Josh Hamilton. After two injury-plagued years that saw the latter fail to produce close to the numbers he had in Texas and admitting to a drug relapse, Moreno basically shunned Hamilton completely in the 2015 pre-season, and the Angels eventually handed him back to the Rangers, getting ''nothing'' in return ''and'' agreeing to still pay more than 80 percent of his remaining contract, which still had three years to go. With the financial strain of that and the six more years on Pujols' deal and a depleted farm system, the Angels could very well be in for another longer Dork Age, despite them also having baseball's current best player, Mike Trout.

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** For what it's worth, though, it was under Disney's ownership that the Angels built the team that won the World Series in 2002. While many fans cheered the Mouse-Ears selling to Arte Moreno that year, Moreno has since wrecked the team by trying to make them the Yankees of the West Coast, giving the front office the edict to always sign the best player in free agency each year (in addition to the debacle over the city of Anaheim suing the team to keep their name with the team, forcing them to now be called the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim). This has led to them dumping proven veterans like Vlad Guererro and Torri Torii Hunter in order to eventually sign expensive contracts with declining superstars like Albert Pujols and Josh Hamilton. After two injury-plagued years that saw the latter fail to produce close to the numbers he had in Texas and admitting to a drug relapse, Moreno basically shunned Hamilton completely in the 2015 pre-season, and the Angels eventually handed him back to the Rangers, getting ''nothing'' in return ''and'' agreeing to still pay more than 80 percent of his remaining contract, which still had three years to go. With the financial strain of that and the six more years on Pujols' deal and a depleted farm system, the Angels could very well be in for another longer Dork Age, despite them also having baseball's current best player, Mike Trout.[[note]]Though as of 2016, Washington Nationals fans may beg to differ, with the rise of Bryce Harper to become Trout's main [[TheRival rival]] for that crown.[[/note]]



** Trading away face-of-the-franchise Mike Piazza, who continued his career as arguably the greatest offensive catcher in baseball history with the New York Mets and will undoubtedly be elected to the Hall of Fame as a Met.

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** Trading away face-of-the-franchise Mike Piazza, who continued his career as arguably the greatest offensive catcher in baseball history with the New York Mets and will undoubtedly be was elected to the Hall of Fame as a Met.



* The Minnesota Twins have had a succession of dark ages interspersed with periods of true brilliance. Their pre-move incarnation, the Washington Senators, were so legendarily bad through much of their existence (with the exception of TheRoaringTwenties, in which the franchise won its first - and for six decades ''only'' - World Series championship), that San Francisco sports writer Charley Dryden once quipped, "Washington: First in war, First in peace, and Last in the American League." The novel ''The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant'' was written riffing on the team's legendary badness, and made into the musical ''DamnYankees''. After their move to Minnesota at the end of the 1960 season, the team rapidly rose to prominence, winning the American League Pennant in 1965 before losing the WorldSeries in seven games to the LosAngelesDodgers. They won the newly-formed AL West twice before this period of prominence came to an end, but end it did, and the team's longest dork age in Minnesota (and the worst uniform in its history) lasted from 1971 until 1984, a period in which arose the team's lasting nickname, the ''Twinkies''. This era marked some of the most shamefully bad play in the franchise's history and ended when the notoriously stingy Griffith family sold the team to local banking magnate Carl Pohlad. 1993 marked the beginning of its second dork age, which lasted until 2000, which was denoted by a number of fading stars with origins in the Twin Cities (which wasn't all bad - Hall of Famers Dave Winfield and Paul Molitor each had reasonably productive years in Minnesota and bagged their 3000th hits wearing Twins pinstripes, but it also brought several infamous loads to the Metrodome), forcing it to rely for the majority of its pitching and run production on players who really should have spent a lot more time developing in the minors, and the third - the shortest one yet - began in 2011 and lasted until the beginning of 2015.

to:

* The Minnesota Twins have had a succession of dark ages interspersed with periods of true brilliance. Their pre-move incarnation, the Washington Senators, were so legendarily bad through much of their existence (with the exception of TheRoaringTwenties, in which the franchise won its first - and for six decades ''only'' - World Series championship), that San Francisco sports writer Charley Dryden once quipped, "Washington: First in war, First in peace, and Last in the American League." The novel ''The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant'' was written riffing on the team's legendary badness, and made into the musical ''DamnYankees''.''Theatre/DamnYankees''. After their move to Minnesota at the end of the 1960 season, the team rapidly rose to prominence, winning the American League Pennant in 1965 before losing the WorldSeries in seven games to the LosAngelesDodgers. They won the newly-formed AL West twice before this period of prominence came to an end, but end it did, and the team's longest dork age in Minnesota (and the worst uniform in its history) lasted from 1971 until 1984, a period in which arose the team's lasting nickname, the ''Twinkies''. This era marked some of the most shamefully bad play in the franchise's history and ended when the notoriously stingy Griffith family sold the team to local banking magnate Carl Pohlad. 1993 marked the beginning of its second dork age, which lasted until 2000, which was denoted by a number of fading stars with origins in the Twin Cities (which wasn't all bad - Hall of Famers Dave Winfield and Paul Molitor each had reasonably productive years in Minnesota and bagged their 3000th hits wearing Twins pinstripes, but it also brought several infamous loads to the Metrodome), forcing it to rely for the majority of its pitching and run production on players who really should have spent a lot more time developing in the minors, and the third - the shortest one yet - began in 2011 and lasted until the beginning of 2015.



* Entire Japanese MMA scene is a shadow of what it was before PRIDE disbanded. Rumors of Yakuza involvement and match fixing kept UFC from its original plan of running PRIDE as a separate organisation, most of the international fighters moved to the American organisations (UFC and Strikeforce) and none of the smaller Japanese promotions (DREAM, DEEP, Shooto, Pancrase) reached similar level of popularity and prestige as PRIDE.

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* Entire The entire Japanese MMA scene is a shadow of what it was before PRIDE disbanded. Rumors of Yakuza involvement and match fixing kept UFC from its original plan of running PRIDE as a separate organisation, most of the international fighters moved to the American organisations (UFC and Strikeforce) and none of the smaller Japanese promotions (DREAM, DEEP, Shooto, Pancrase) reached similar level of popularity and prestige as PRIDE.



*** The dominance of Jimmie Johnson. Jeff Gordon has been a polarizing figure for his career for being a California transplant coming in and winning, but at least he would occasionally crack a smile, show charisma and make it look like he might actually have some good ol’ boy in him. Johnson (whose car is owned by Gordon) has pretty much been a politically correct milquetoast personality that Madison Avenue loves but has never been popular with racing fans that prefer characters. Add that to him taking advantage of the aforementioned Chase format to win five consecutive championships (breaking Cale Yarborough’s record of three straight) and holding six as of 2015 to put him just one behind legends Richard Petty and Dale Earnhardt, and he made racing boring for quite a few old guard fans.
*** Several rules changes, with the biggest perhaps being the “freeze the field” rule that immediately halts racing the instant a caution flag comes out rather than allowing drivers to race back to the line first. This led to NASCAR having to make even more changes to try and avoid a race ending under yellow, finally agreeing to add the “green-white-checkered” rule (the race is extended past the scheduled # of laps to allow two last laps of racing if needed). While this has been the best possible option to ensure fans got to see an actual race finish, it still irked some fans who felt such conditions “cheapened a race win coming longer than the actual # of miles ran.
*** The "Car of Tomorrow," which was introduced in 2007 with its splitter replacing the front bumper and rear wing replacing the spoiler; the new car was among several new safety mandates NASCAR introduced after Dale Earnhardt's fatal crash on the last lap of the 2001 Daytona 500 (which sadly may have been the incident that spiked NASCAR's popularity in the early 2000s). Despite doing its job as far as safety - no one has died in a crash after four died from 2000-01 - drivers complained about its handling and fans complained about boring racing as a result. The car was announced to be discontinued as of 2013.

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*** The dominance of Jimmie Johnson. Jeff Gordon has been a polarizing figure for his career for being a California transplant coming in and winning, but at least he would occasionally crack a smile, show charisma and make it look like he might actually have some good ol’ boy in him. Johnson (whose car is owned by Gordon) has pretty much been a politically correct milquetoast personality that Madison Avenue loves but has never been popular with racing fans that prefer characters. Add that to him taking advantage of the aforementioned Chase format to win five consecutive championships (breaking Cale Yarborough’s record of three straight) and holding six as of 2015 to put him just one behind legends Richard Petty and Dale Earnhardt, Creator/DaleEarnhardt, and he made racing boring for quite a few old guard fans.
*** Several rules changes, with the biggest perhaps being the “freeze the field” rule that immediately halts racing the instant a caution flag comes out rather than allowing drivers to race back to the line first. This led to NASCAR having to make even more changes to try and avoid a race ending under yellow, finally agreeing to add the “green-white-checkered” “green-white-checker” rule (the race is extended past the scheduled # of laps to allow two last laps of racing if needed). While this has been the best possible option to ensure fans got to see an actual race finish, it still irked some fans who felt such conditions “cheapened a race win coming longer than the actual # of miles ran.
*** The "Car of Tomorrow," which was introduced in 2007 with its splitter replacing the front bumper and rear wing replacing the spoiler; the new car was among several new safety mandates NASCAR introduced after Dale Earnhardt's Creator/DaleEarnhardt's fatal crash on the last lap of the 2001 Daytona 500 (which sadly may have been the incident that spiked NASCAR's popularity in the early 2000s). Despite doing its job as far as safety - no one has died in a crash after four died from 2000-01 - drivers complained about its handling and fans complained about boring racing as a result. The car was announced to be discontinued as of 2013.



* UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan, the famed basketball player, playing professional baseball. Even he admits he wasn't that good and that it was mostly a chance to clear his head after his father's death, a process not fully completed until [[Film/SpaceJam he helped classic Looney Toon characters triumph over the diabolical Mon-Stars]]. Tin-foil heads have a great conspiracy theory that states he was secretly suspended for a year for a gambling problem. There's no proof, but man, few people would be surprised.

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* UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan, the famed basketball player, playing professional baseball. Even he admits he wasn't that good and that it was mostly a chance to clear his head after his father's death, a process not fully completed until [[Film/SpaceJam he helped classic Looney Toon Tunes characters triumph over the diabolical Mon-Stars]]. Tin-foil heads have a great conspiracy theory that states he was secretly suspended for a year for a gambling problem. There's no proof, but man, few people would be surprised.



* One could claim the New York Knicks have been in a Dork Age since 1973, the last year they won the championship, especially since they have only made the NBA Finals twice in the more than 40 years since then. But the years following that last Finals trip in 1999 have been especially lean. The Knicks have only made it past the first round of the playoffs once since 2001, missing the playoffs entirely 10 times in that span. They have brought in the likes of Lenny Wilkens, Larry Brown, Isaiah Thomas and even Phil Jackson to turn things around, and yet things just seem to get worse and worse. Jackson’s first year as team president saw them hit rock bottom, as their 17 wins in 2014-15 were the fewest in franchise history - for a team that dates back to the NBA’s founding, including the early years where they played at least 20 games fewer in a season than they do now.

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* One could claim the New York Knicks have been in a Dork Age since 1973, the last year they won the championship, especially since they have only made the NBA Finals twice in the more than 40 years since then. But the years following that last Finals trip in 1999 have been especially lean. The Knicks have only made it past the first round of the playoffs once since 2001, missing the playoffs entirely 10 times in that span. They have brought in the likes of Lenny Wilkens, Larry Brown, Isaiah Isiah Thomas and even Phil Jackson to turn things around, and yet things just seem to get worse and worse. Jackson’s first year as team president saw them hit rock bottom, as their 17 wins in 2014-15 were the fewest in franchise history - for a team that dates back to the NBA’s founding, including the early years where they played at least 20 games fewer in a season than they do now.



* It can be argued that the mighty Los Angeles Lakers are currently in a Dork Age. After winning 2 Championships with the Kobe Bryant-Pau Gasol-Phil Jackson core, the Lakers underwent several misfortunes (Early playoff exits, A blocked trade for Chris Paul, Aging players, Phil Jackson retiring) that brought them from a contender to a playoff disappointment. To solve these problems and compete in the rough Western Conference, the Lakers brought in superstars Dwight Howard and Steve Nash through trades in 2012. While the Lakers were expected to dominate and win the Championship with that roster, they ended up doing the opposite: they struggled throughout the season (due to injuries, underperforming players, incompetent coaching, and lack of team chemistry) and ended up barely (with a 42-40 record) making the playoffs, where they were SWEPT by the San Antonio Spurs ([[KickTheDog To make it worse]], longtime owner Jerry Buss died that season). The next season was a lot harsher, as Dwight Howard left for Houston, [[WorfHadTheFlu Kobe and Steve Nash were out for almost the entire season thanks to injuries]], and the Lakers ended up missing the playoffs for the first time since 2005. The [[HumiliationConga pain train]] just kept chugging on for the Lakers during the most recent season, as several players (Steve Nash, Pau Gasol etc.) left thru free agency or retirement, Kobe continued playing despite being injured and WAY past his prime, and LA had to put on the floor mediocre players such as Ed Davis, Wesley Johnson, and Ronnie Price. The result? A 21-61 record; the Lakers' worst season since they moved to Los Angeles. Not helping the Lakers right now is their less-than-stellar front office and ownership (Current VP of Basketball Operations, Jim Buss (Jerry's son), is commonly seen as the scapegoat of these problems), and their inability to attract top tier free agents. However, there seems to be a light at the end of the tunnel, as the Lakers have young and promising players (and possible all-stars) such as Julius Randle, Jordan Clarkson and D'Angelo Russell, and Kobe's retirement will free up a large portion of the team's budget. However, the 2015-16 Lakers ended posting their [[FromBadToWorse worst record in franchise history,]] 17-65.

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* It can be argued that the mighty Los Angeles Lakers are currently in a Dork Age. After winning 2 Championships championships with the Kobe Bryant-Pau Gasol-Phil Jackson core, the Lakers underwent several misfortunes (Early playoff exits, A blocked trade for Chris Paul, Aging aging players, Phil Jackson retiring) that brought them from a contender to a playoff disappointment. To solve these problems and compete in the rough Western Conference, the Lakers brought in superstars Dwight Howard and Steve Nash through trades in 2012. While the Lakers were expected to dominate and win the Championship with that roster, they ended up doing the opposite: they struggled throughout the season (due to injuries, underperforming players, incompetent coaching, and lack of team chemistry) and ended up barely (with a 42-40 record) making the playoffs, where they were SWEPT by the San Antonio Spurs ([[KickTheDog To make it worse]], longtime owner Jerry Buss died that season). The next season was a lot harsher, as Dwight Howard left for Houston, [[WorfHadTheFlu Kobe and Steve Nash were out for almost the entire season thanks to injuries]], and the Lakers ended up missing the playoffs for the first time since 2005. The [[HumiliationConga pain train]] just kept chugging on for the Lakers during the most recent season, as several players (Steve Nash, Pau Gasol etc.) left thru free agency or retirement, Kobe continued playing despite being injured and WAY past his prime, and LA had to put on the floor mediocre players such as Ed Davis, Wesley Johnson, and Ronnie Price. The result? A 21-61 record; the Lakers' worst season since they moved to Los Angeles. Not helping the Lakers right now is their less-than-stellar front office and ownership (Current (current VP of Basketball Operations, Jim Buss (Jerry's son), is commonly seen as the scapegoat of these problems), and their inability to attract top tier free agents. However, there seems to be a light at the end of the tunnel, as the Lakers have young and promising players (and possible all-stars) such as Julius Randle, Jordan Clarkson and D'Angelo Russell, and Kobe's retirement will free up a large portion of the team's budget. However, the 2015-16 Lakers ended posting their [[FromBadToWorse worst record in franchise history,]] 17-65. And, even though Kobe's retirement did give the Lakers a huge amount of cap room, his salary comes off the books at the exact time that the league's huge new TV deal kicks in, giving about ''half the league'' cap room at least as large as that of the Lakers.



* After receiving the NCAA's first-ever "death penalty" (banned from playing games for two years) in 1987, Southern Methodist University would have only one winning season and no bowl games in the 20 years after that, until June Jones took over as coach for the 2008 season and ended the drought the next year.

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* After receiving the NCAA's first-ever "death penalty" (banned from playing games for two years) in 1987, 1987,[[note]]Technically, SMU was banned only for the 1987 season, but would have been limited to only road games in 1988; the school decided to sit out 1988 as well since they saw no chance of being competitive.[[/note]] Southern Methodist University would have only one winning season and no bowl games in the 20 years after that, until June Jones took over as coach for the 2008 season and ended the drought the next year.



** A regression in starting quarterback Jeff Driskel. Once considered to be the best recruit of the 2010 class, he performed worse and worse to the point where NFL and College Football Hall of Famer and former Florida runningback Emmitt Smith publicly called for Driskel to be benched on Twitter.

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** A regression in starting quarterback Jeff Driskel. Once considered to be the best recruit of the 2010 class, he performed worse and worse to the point where NFL and College Football Hall of Famer and former Florida runningback running back Emmitt Smith publicly called for Driskel to be benched on Twitter.



* The Tennessee Volunteers have been hit with this ever since Phillip Fullmer left in 2008, and these are just the coaches responsible:

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* The Tennessee Volunteers have been hit with this ever since Phillip Fullmer Fulmer left in 2008, and these are just the coaches responsible:



* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980 and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl loss in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1984 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than tarnish his reputation. Pitt rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've managed eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]

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* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill Sherrill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980 and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl loss in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1984 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than tarnish his reputation. Pitt rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've managed eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]



** It didn't help Wannstedt when Jim Harbaugh walked after the 1993 season. Also, a series of poor draft picks (John Thierry, Curtis Enis, Cade McNown, David Terrell) ensured that the Bears would stay in that DorkAge for some time.

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** It didn't help Wannstedt when Jim Harbaugh walked after the 1993 season. Also, a series of poor draft picks (John Thierry, Curtis Enis, Cade McNown, [=McNown=], David Terrell) ensured that the Bears would stay in that DorkAge for some time.



* The NFL's St. Louis Rams' downward spiral can be seen as a DorkAge for some. 2005 started the decline with a 6-10 season. After Mike Martz was fired following the 2005 season, the Rams hired [[TheScrappy Scott Linehan]] to be their head coach. They quickly jumped to a 4-1 start, only to finish with an 8-8 record. However, things went sour. They finished the next two seasons with 3-13 and 2-14; with the defence ranked dead last both seasons. During the 2008 season, the Rams fired Linehan and replaced him with Jim Haslett after an 0-4 start. The architect of part of the Rams' Dork Age, Jay Zygmunt, resigned before the 2008 season was over and Billy Devaney took over and eventually became GM. Steve Spagnuolo, hyped as being the next best head coach ever, was hired. Despite a dreadful 1-15, they kept Spags and drafted Sam Bradford to replace Marc Bulger (who was released on April 5, 2010). They struggled early on in the 2010 season, going 0-2, then going 7-7 afterwards. However, they lost a key game against Seattle on the road, finishing 2010 with a 7-9 record and losing the division to the Seahawks ''on a tiebreaker''. Offencive coordinator Pat Shurmur was hired by the Cleveland Browns and then replaced by [[ReplacementScrappy Josh McDaniels]] (but only after their original hire of Gregg Williams was banned indefinitely [in the end, for a year] due to the New Orleans Saints "bounty scandal"). Fast forward to the 2011 season, when the Rams lost their first six games despite being favorites to win the NFC West. they're picked to win the NFC West. Fans blamed the team's dead-last offensive ranking on Bradford, [[MisBlamed but failed to note that the weak O-line hardly did anything to protect him.]] They neglected to pick up any wide receivers, except for signing a washed-up Mike Sims-Walker (who they recently waived). Seems they built the team ''around'' Steven Jackson instead of Sam Bradford.

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* The NFL's St. Louis Rams' downward spiral can be seen as a DorkAge for some. 2005 started the decline with a 6-10 season. After Mike Martz was fired following the 2005 season, the Rams hired [[TheScrappy Scott Linehan]] to be their head coach. They quickly jumped to a 4-1 start, only to finish with an 8-8 record. However, things went sour. They finished the next two seasons with 3-13 and 2-14; with the defence ranked dead last both seasons. During the 2008 season, the Rams fired Linehan and replaced him with Jim Haslett after an 0-4 start. The architect of part of the Rams' Dork Age, Jay Zygmunt, resigned before the 2008 season was over and Billy Devaney took over and eventually became GM. Steve Spagnuolo, hyped as being the next best head coach ever, was hired. Despite a dreadful 1-15, they kept Spags and drafted Sam Bradford to replace Marc Bulger (who was released on April 5, 2010). They struggled early on in the 2010 season, going 0-2, then going 7-7 afterwards. However, they lost a key game against Seattle on the road, finishing 2010 with a 7-9 record and losing the division to the Seahawks ''on a tiebreaker''. Offencive Offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur was hired by the Cleveland Browns and then replaced by [[ReplacementScrappy Josh McDaniels]] (but only after their original hire of Gregg Williams was banned indefinitely [in the end, for a year] due to the New Orleans Saints "bounty scandal"). Fast forward to the 2011 season, when the Rams lost their first six games despite being favorites to win the NFC West. they're picked to win the NFC West. Fans blamed the team's dead-last offensive ranking on Bradford, [[MisBlamed but failed to note that the weak O-line hardly did anything to protect him.]] They neglected to pick up any wide receivers, except for signing a washed-up Mike Sims-Walker (who they recently waived). Seems they built the team ''around'' Steven Jackson instead of Sam Bradford.



* When it comes to the Dork Age of Sports, Who Dey! Who Dey! Who Dey think gonna beat dem Cincinnati Bengals?! Twenty-five years without a playoff win. Seven playoff games = seven embarassing losses; the last five, in a franchise-record playoffs streak from 2011-15, resulted in an NFL record for consecutive first round losses, including two squandered division titles (2013, 2015). A Who's Who List of Draft Busts and Questionable-at-Best Free Agent Pickups. A scouting department and coaching staffs full of [[YesMan Yes Men]]. A tortured fanbase ''foaming at the mouth'' for a better team. And the one constant string-puller in the last two decades of debacles? Mike Brown.

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* When it comes to the Dork Age of Sports, Who Dey! Who Dey! Who Dey think gonna beat dem Cincinnati Bengals?! Twenty-five years without a playoff win. Seven playoff games = seven embarassing embarrassing losses; the last five, in a franchise-record playoffs streak from 2011-15, resulted in an NFL record for consecutive first round losses, including two squandered division titles (2013, 2015). A Who's Who List of Draft Busts and Questionable-at-Best Free Agent Pickups. A scouting department and coaching staffs full of [[YesMan Yes Men]]. A tortured fanbase ''foaming at the mouth'' for a better team. And the one constant string-puller in the last two decades of debacles? Mike Brown.



* The "new" Cleveland Browns. A once-successful franchise that was the home of legendary running back Jim Brown and a long history that included four NFL championships, and three championships when they were part of the All-American Football Conference before that league folded and the Browns jumped to the NFL itself. Though they never won a championship in the "Super Bowl" era (1967 to present) they did have 14 playoff appearances and were, at worst, a respectable team. Then, in 1995, owner Art Modell controversially uprooted the franchise and moved them to Baltimore. The city of Cleveland filed a lawsuit and were allowed to hold on to the Browns name and history, in hopes of one day returning to play under a new franchise, which they were eventually awarded, and after a three-year hiatus, the Browns returned to the NFL as an expansion team in 1999. Since then, they've been a disaster, posting a 84–172 record through the 2014 season. They have had only two winning seasons:(2002, 2007), and only made the playoffs once as a wild card team. The reason for the continued ineptitude are multiple, and include a revolving-door at both the head coach and Quarterback positions they can never seem to fix, years of bad draft picks, injuries, and embarrassing legal problems with the ownership. Playing in a tough division opposite Baltimore, Cincinnati and Pittsburgh hasn't helped, either. To add salt to the wound, the "old" Cleveland Browns (now Baltimore Ravens) have since won two Super Bowls, while the "new" Browns are widely viewed as the league's ButtMonkey franchise.
** The quarterback position has been a particularly sore spot for the new Browns, as they've either had draft busts (Tim Couch, and, unless he sorts his life out, Johhny Manziel), nondescript journeymen (Kelly Holcomb, Josh and Luke [=McCown=]), or past-their-prime former studs (Jeff Garcia, Jake Delhomme) leading the team. As of the 2016 offseason, the team has had 24 starting quarterbacks in 17 seasons. Compare that to the New England Patriots, who have only had three starting [=QBs=] -- Drew Bledsoe, Sports/TomBrady, and Matt Cassel -- over the same period of time.

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* The "new" Cleveland Browns. A once-successful franchise that was the home of legendary running back Jim Brown and a long history that included four NFL championships, and three championships when they were part of the All-American Football Conference before that league folded and the Browns jumped to the NFL itself. Though they never won a championship in the "Super Bowl" era (1967 to present) they did have 14 playoff appearances and were, at worst, a respectable team. Then, in 1995, owner Art Modell controversially uprooted the franchise and moved them to Baltimore. The city of Cleveland filed a lawsuit and were allowed to hold on to the Browns name and history, in hopes of one day returning to play under a new franchise, which they were eventually awarded, and after a three-year hiatus, the Browns returned to the NFL as an expansion team in 1999. Since then, they've been a disaster, posting a 84–172 record through the 2014 season. They have had only two winning seasons:(2002, seasons (2002, 2007), and only made the playoffs once as a wild card team. The reason for the continued ineptitude are multiple, and include a revolving-door at both the head coach and Quarterback positions they can never seem to fix, years of bad draft picks, injuries, and embarrassing legal problems with the ownership. Playing in a tough division opposite Baltimore, Cincinnati and Pittsburgh hasn't helped, either. To add salt to the wound, the "old" Cleveland Browns (now Baltimore Ravens) have since won two Super Bowls, while the "new" Browns are widely viewed as the league's ButtMonkey franchise.
** The quarterback position has been a particularly sore spot for the new Browns, as they've either had draft busts (Tim Couch, and, unless he sorts his life out, Johhny Manziel), nondescript journeymen (Kelly Holcomb, Josh and Luke [=McCown=]), or past-their-prime former studs (Jeff Garcia, Jake Delhomme) leading the team. As of the 2016 offseason, the team has had 24 starting quarterbacks in 17 seasons. Compare that to the New England Patriots, who have only had three starting [=QBs=] -- Drew Bledsoe, Sports/TomBrady, Creator/TomBrady, and Matt Cassel -- over the same period of time.



* Due to its extremely small market, the Edmonton Oilers have had this trope invoked often. The rare aversion in their history came, oddly enough, when Wayne Gretzky was traded to the Los Angeles Kings in 1988. At first, it began as a textbook DorkAge when the Kings beat the Oilers in the 1989 playoffs, but Edmonton averted it by winning the Stanley Cup the following year with Mark Messier as the face of the franchise. The year following the Oilers' Cup win, Messier was traded to the New York Rangers, beginning one of two Dork Ages.

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* Due to its extremely small market, the Edmonton Oilers have had this trope invoked often. The rare aversion in their history came, oddly enough, when Wayne Gretzky UsefulNotes/WayneGretzky was traded to the Los Angeles Kings in 1988. At first, it began as a textbook DorkAge when the Kings beat the Oilers in the 1989 playoffs, but Edmonton averted it by winning the Stanley Cup the following year with Mark Messier as the face of the franchise. The year following the Oilers' Cup win, Messier was traded to the New York Rangers, beginning one of two Dork Ages.



** 4. Selling ESPN's television broadcast rights to the NHL to what was at the time, the nearly-unheard-of Outdoor Life Network, that later became Versus. Hockey fans [[SarcasmMode took pride]] that their sport was on the same network as APBR Bull Riding and Dirt Track racing. And even then the coverage of Hockey was notoriously bad. Only recently under the new name of NBC Sports Network has it gotten any better.

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** 4. Selling ESPN's television broadcast rights to the NHL to what was at the time, the nearly-unheard-of Outdoor Life Network, that later became Versus. Hockey fans [[SarcasmMode took pride]] that their sport was on the same network as APBR PBR Bull Riding and Dirt Track racing. And even then the coverage of Hockey was notoriously bad. Only recently under the new name of NBC Sports Network has it gotten any better.



** On the other hand, in men's doubles, the Bryan twins have been ridiculously dominant for most of this period, with 15 Grand Slam titles (four of them in succession, though not in the same calendar year), an Olympic gold, and too many tournament wins to count.

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** On the other hand, in men's doubles, the Bryan twins have been ridiculously dominant for most of this period, with 15 16 Grand Slam titles (four of them in succession, though not in the same calendar year), an Olympic gold, and too many tournament wins to count.
26th Apr '16 12:31:09 PM 3rdStringPG
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Added DiffLines:

** Some will argue that the PBA in the mid-2010s is also going through a new Dork Age. Arguably biased commissioner? Check. Lack of effort on defense? Check. High scores (Filipinos tend to love defensive basketball) as a result of said lack of defense? Check. No parity, what with two expansion teams making it a 12-team league in 2014? Check. Bullshit trades that benefit contenders and make also-rans look like farm teams? Check, check, and check.
19th Apr '16 5:48:46 PM AllenbysEyes88
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* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980 and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl loss in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. Pitt rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've managed eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]

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* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980 and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl loss in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 1984 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch tarnish his reputation. Pitt rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've managed eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]
19th Apr '16 3:55:10 PM AllenbysEyes88
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* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980 and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl loss in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. The team rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've managed eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]

to:

* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980 and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl loss in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. The team Pitt rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've managed eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]
19th Apr '16 3:54:10 PM AllenbysEyes88
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* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980, three Eastern Conference championships and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl loss in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. The team rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've made eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]

to:

* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980, three Eastern Conference championships 1980 and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl loss in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. The team rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've made managed eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]
19th Apr '16 3:52:35 PM AllenbysEyes88
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980, three Eastern Conference championships and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl win in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. The team rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've made eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]

to:

* The Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980, three Eastern Conference championships and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl win loss in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. The team rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've made eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]
19th Apr '16 3:51:35 PM AllenbysEyes88
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Pitt Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980, three Eastern Conference championships and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl win in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. The team rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've made eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]

to:

* The Pitt Pittsburgh Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980, three Eastern Conference championships and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl win in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. The team rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've made eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]
19th Apr '16 3:51:11 PM AllenbysEyes88
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[[/folder]]

to:

* The Pitt Panthers were once a major force in college football. Under coaches Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherill and Foge Fazio and quarterback Dan Marino, they won a national title in 1980, three Eastern Conference championships and consistently reached major bowls throughout the '70s and early '80s. After a Fiesta Bowl win in 1983, the team went 3-8 the following year, beginning a drastic downslide. The team made only two minor bowls between 1983 and 1997; even Majors' return in the mid-90s did little more than besmirch his reputation. The team rebuilt drastically under Walt Harris, reaching several bowls including a 2004 Fiesta Bowl (where [[CurbStompBattle they were crushed by Utah, 35-7]]). As of this writing, they've made eight consecutive bowl appearances, though still haven't matched their peak in the '70s and '80s.[[/folder]]
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