History DorkAge / Sports

23rd Jul '16 4:17:52 AM 3rdStringPG
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** There's the '70s Dork Age, which featured past-their-prime [=QBs=] Craig Morton and Norm Snead, and mediocre youngster Joe Pisarcik at quarterback. From 1973 to 1980, the Giants finished either fourth or fifth (and last) in their division, though by 1979, they'd made one big move to end this Dork Age, drafting Phil Simms as their quarterback of the future.

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** There's the '70s Dork Age, which featured past-their-prime [=QBs=] Craig Morton and Norm Snead, and mediocre youngster Joe Pisarcik (he of the infamous fumble that led to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_at_the_Meadowlands Miracle at the Meadowlands]]) at quarterback. From 1973 to 1980, the Giants finished either fourth or fifth (and last) in their division, though by 1979, they'd made one big move to end this Dork Age, drafting Phil Simms as their quarterback of the future.
22nd Jul '16 5:21:54 AM 3rdStringPG
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** There's the '70s Dork Age, which featured past-their-prime QBs Craig Morton and Norm Snead, and mediocre youngster Joe Pisarcik at quarterback. From 1973 to 1980, the Giants finished either fourth or fifth (and last) in their division, though by 1979, they'd made one big move to end this Dork Age, drafting Phil Simms as their quarterback of the future.
** After winning Super Bowl XXV, the rough, gruff, yet brilliant and successful Bill Parcells retired from football, with his head coaching job going to Ray Handley. One of his first moves was to have a gimpy, yet still capable Simms battle it out for starting QB with Super Bowl XXV hero Jeff Hostetler, who was a capable fill-in, but not franchise QB material. And while he seemed at first to be a nicer guy than Parcells, media, and ultimately players, didn't see him that way, as he refused to take accountability for the Giants' descent "from the Super Bowl to the toilet bowl". Handley was gone after going 14-18 in two seasons (1991-92), and while Dan Reeves led the Giants to an 11-5 record in 1993, the team turned over the QB reins to the disappointing Dave Brown in 1994. And Danny Kanell in 1997 when Brown wasn't cutting it. And while their record under those two QBs (a combined 38-41-1) isn't ''that'' bad, it can be said that the Giants achieved such a record despite of, and not because of their quarterbacks.

to:

** There's the '70s Dork Age, which featured past-their-prime QBs [=QBs=] Craig Morton and Norm Snead, and mediocre youngster Joe Pisarcik at quarterback. From 1973 to 1980, the Giants finished either fourth or fifth (and last) in their division, though by 1979, they'd made one big move to end this Dork Age, drafting Phil Simms as their quarterback of the future.
** After winning Super Bowl XXV, the rough, gruff, yet brilliant and successful Bill Parcells retired from football, with his head coaching job going to Ray Handley. One of his first moves was to have a gimpy, yet still capable Simms battle it out for starting QB with Super Bowl XXV hero Jeff Hostetler, who was a capable fill-in, but not franchise QB material. And while he seemed at first to be a nicer guy than Parcells, media, and ultimately players, didn't see him that way, as he refused to take accountability for the Giants' descent "from the Super Bowl to the toilet bowl". Handley was gone after going 14-18 in two seasons (1991-92), and while Dan Reeves led the Giants to an 11-5 record in 1993, the team turned over the QB reins to the disappointing Dave Brown in 1994. And Danny Kanell in 1997 when Brown wasn't cutting it. And while their record under those two QBs [=QBs=] (a combined 38-41-1) isn't ''that'' bad, it can be said that the Giants achieved such a record despite of, and not because of their quarterbacks.
22nd Jul '16 5:20:57 AM 3rdStringPG
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** The quarterback position has been a particularly sore spot for the new Browns, as they've either had draft busts (Tim Couch, and, unless he sorts his life out, Johnny Manziel), nondescript journeymen (Kelly Holcomb, Josh and Luke [=McCown=]), or past-their-prime former studs (Jeff Garcia, Jake Delhomme) leading the team. As of the 2016 offseason, the team has had 24 starting quarterbacks in 17 seasons. Compare that to the New England Patriots, who have only had ''three'' starting [=QBs=] -- Drew Bledsoe, Creator/TomBrady, and Matt Cassel -- over the same period of time.

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** The quarterback position has been a particularly sore spot for the new Browns, as they've either had draft busts (Tim Couch, and, unless he sorts his life out, Johnny Manziel), nondescript journeymen (Kelly Holcomb, Josh and Luke [=McCown=]), or past-their-prime former studs (Jeff Garcia, Jake Delhomme) leading the team. As of the 2016 offseason, the team has had 24 starting quarterbacks in 17 seasons. Compare that to the New England Patriots, who have only had ''three'' starting [=QBs=] -- Drew Bledsoe, Creator/TomBrady, and Brady fill-in Matt Cassel -- over the same period of time.


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* The New York Giants have had great success in multiple eras -- the late-'50s and early-'60s with Y.A. Tittle, Frank Gifford, and Sam Huff, the mid-'80s to early-'90s with Phil Simms and Lawrence Taylor, and, in more recent years, their two Eli Manning-led Super Bowl teams. But they've also had about just as many Dork Ages.
** The first Dork Age of Giants football came in 1946, when star quarterback Frank Filchock and fullback Merle Hapes were banned from the NFL for their roles in a betting scandal, where a gambler allegedly paid them off to fix the 1946 championship against the Chicago Bears. Post-betting scandal, the Giants dropped from 7-3-1 in 1946 to 2-8-2 in 1947, and didn't recover until QB Charlie Conerly's rise to stardom in the early-'50s.
** There's the '70s Dork Age, which featured past-their-prime QBs Craig Morton and Norm Snead, and mediocre youngster Joe Pisarcik at quarterback. From 1973 to 1980, the Giants finished either fourth or fifth (and last) in their division, though by 1979, they'd made one big move to end this Dork Age, drafting Phil Simms as their quarterback of the future.
** After winning Super Bowl XXV, the rough, gruff, yet brilliant and successful Bill Parcells retired from football, with his head coaching job going to Ray Handley. One of his first moves was to have a gimpy, yet still capable Simms battle it out for starting QB with Super Bowl XXV hero Jeff Hostetler, who was a capable fill-in, but not franchise QB material. And while he seemed at first to be a nicer guy than Parcells, media, and ultimately players, didn't see him that way, as he refused to take accountability for the Giants' descent "from the Super Bowl to the toilet bowl". Handley was gone after going 14-18 in two seasons (1991-92), and while Dan Reeves led the Giants to an 11-5 record in 1993, the team turned over the QB reins to the disappointing Dave Brown in 1994. And Danny Kanell in 1997 when Brown wasn't cutting it. And while their record under those two QBs (a combined 38-41-1) isn't ''that'' bad, it can be said that the Giants achieved such a record despite of, and not because of their quarterbacks.
18th Jul '16 4:38:18 AM Freezer
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*** Even worse: A clearly diminished MJ was ''clearly still'' the best player on the Wizard's roster.
18th Jul '16 4:35:59 AM Freezer
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** Nor did it help when Ricky Williams walked, ten years later when Wannstedt was the coach of the Miami Dolphins. Still, his popularity among Miami Dolphins fans is likewise rather low. To be fair, Jimmy Johnson's attempts to trade Dan Marino, the Dolphins' one bankable asset (trying to recreate the Hershel Walker trade) and find a franchise running back resulted in several wasted drafts, and left the team's offensive talent level thin. (He had much better luck on the defensive side, his true strength, bringing in players like Jason Taylor, Zach Thomas and Sam Madison)

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** Nor did it help when Ricky Williams walked, ten years later when Wannstedt was the coach of the Miami Dolphins. Still, his popularity among Miami Dolphins fans is likewise rather low. To be fair, Jimmy Johnson's attempts to trade Dan Marino, the Dolphins' one bankable asset (trying to recreate the Hershel Walker trade) and find a franchise running back resulted in several wasted drafts, and left the team's offensive talent level thin. (He had much better luck on the defensive side, his true strength, bringing in players like Jason Taylor, Zach Thomas and Sam Madison)



* After years of success in Oakland and Los Angeles, the Oakland Raiders entered a Dork Age after their 2003 curb-stomping by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII (Who were led by Jon Gruden, the head coach Al Davis practically gave away with contempt). In the ten seasons since, they haven't returned to the playoffs and only finished better than 5-11 three times, in 2010 and 2011 with 88 records, and 2015 at 79. All but the most apologetic NFL fans point to Al Davis' waning health and mental capabilities late in life, and his stubborn refusal step down as General Manager. Some fans think it actually started with Davis' falling out and eventual acrimonious split with running back Marcus Allen in 1993 (Allen left as a free agent and signed with the Raiders' bitter rival, Kansas City). Things have started turn around with Davis' son, Mark Davis, in control.

to:

* After years of success in Oakland and Los Angeles, the Oakland Raiders entered a Dork Age after their 2003 curb-stomping by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII (Who were led by Jon Gruden, the head coach Al Davis practically gave away with contempt). In the ten seasons since, they haven't returned to the playoffs and only finished better than 5-11 three times, in 2010 and 2011 with 88 records, and 2015 at 79. All but the most apologetic NFL fans point to Al Davis' waning health and mental capabilities late in life, and his stubborn refusal step down as General Manager. Manager. Some fans think it actually started with Davis' falling out and eventual acrimonious split with running back Marcus Allen in 1993 (Allen left as a free agent and signed with the Raiders' bitter rival, Kansas City). City). Things have started turn around with Davis' son, Mark Davis, in control.



* Deflategate killed any chance of Roger Goodell being considered a successful NFL commissioner; as of the 2016 season, many who heard about Tom Brady's surrender now see the NFL as little more than an autocracy in which anything the commissioner says goes, which is bound to not bode well for the unlucky man who ends up having to fill Goodell's shoes later on, as Goodell's victory ended up setting in stone a very dangerous precedent, to put it lightly, and perhaps even foreshadowing darker times to come for anyone hoping to play in the NFL.
* Nine of the ten American Football League teams have points of pride they can point to from the league's ten-year history. Six of the original eight won championships, Boston (now New England) had a Championship appearance in 1963 and sported several future Hall-of-Famers, Miami was the first AFL expansion team and brought pro football to Florida, and Cincinnati brought Paul Brown back to pro football. And then there's the Denver Broncos, who were the league's perennial doormat. The only team of the original eight to never post a winning season, they also had the additional stigma of sporting one of the [[http://blog.heritagesportsart.com/2010/08/denver-broncos-uniform-and-team-history.html all-time ugliest uniforms in all of pro sports]] for their first three years. Broncos fans tend not to EVER bring up their AFL years.

to:

* Deflategate killed any chance of Roger Goodell being considered a successful NFL commissioner; as of the 2016 season, many who heard about Tom Brady's surrender now see the NFL as little more than an autocracy in which anything the commissioner says goes, which is bound to not bode well for the unlucky man who ends up having to fill Goodell's shoes later on, as Goodell's victory ended up setting in stone a very dangerous precedent, to put it lightly, and perhaps even foreshadowing darker times to come for anyone hoping to play in the NFL.
* Nine of the ten American Football League teams have points of pride they can point to from the league's ten-year history. Six of the original eight won championships, Boston (now New England) had a Championship appearance in 1963 and sported several future Hall-of-Famers, Miami was the first AFL expansion team and brought pro football to Florida, and Cincinnati brought Paul Brown back to pro football. football. And then there's the Denver Broncos, who were the league's perennial doormat. doormat. The only team of the original eight to never post a winning season, they also had the additional stigma of sporting one of the [[http://blog.heritagesportsart.com/2010/08/denver-broncos-uniform-and-team-history.html all-time ugliest uniforms in all of pro sports]] for their first three years. Broncos fans tend not to EVER bring up their AFL years.
18th Jul '16 4:32:53 AM Freezer
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** Nor did it help when Ricky Williams walked, ten years later when Wannstedt was the coach of the Miami Dolphins. Still, his popularity among Miami Dolphins fans is likewise rather low. To be fair, Jimmy Johnson's desperate attempts to destroy Dan Marino and find a franchise running back resulted in several wasted drafts, and left the team's talent level thin.
*** If anything, the entire Jimmy Johnson era and legacy could be considered a dork age for the Dolphins. Johnson's popularity resulted in legendary coach Don Shula's "stepping down" ''cough cough''. Johnson's insistence that it would be his team, built his way, meant neutralizing Marino, the team's best player; and Johnson repeatedly wasted high picks on unworthy running backs such as John Avery and James Johnson (no relation). Not to mention, he brought in Cecil "the Diesel" Collins, who went to prison for probation violations before even playing a season. Then Johnson quit on the team, and hand-selected Wannstedt as his successor, and the Dolphins have been ordinary (at best) ever since.

to:

** Nor did it help when Ricky Williams walked, ten years later when Wannstedt was the coach of the Miami Dolphins. Still, his popularity among Miami Dolphins fans is likewise rather low. To be fair, Jimmy Johnson's desperate attempts to destroy trade Dan Marino Marino, the Dolphins' one bankable asset (trying to recreate the Hershel Walker trade) and find a franchise running back resulted in several wasted drafts, and left the team's offensive talent level thin.
thin. (He had much better luck on the defensive side, his true strength, bringing in players like Jason Taylor, Zach Thomas and Sam Madison)
*** If anything, the entire Jimmy Johnson era and legacy could be considered a dork age for the Dolphins. Johnson's popularity resulted in legendary coach Don Shula's "stepping down" ''cough cough''. Johnson's insistence that it would be his team, built his way, meant neutralizing Marino, clashes with Marino (particularly over Johnson's attempts to trade him), the team's best player; and Johnson repeatedly wasted used high picks on unworthy running backs such as John Avery and James Johnson (no relation). relation), who ended up as role players at best. Not to mention, he brought in Cecil "the Diesel" Collins, who went to prison for probation violations before even playing a season. Then season (he was only a fifth-round pick, but the embarrassment was still strong). Johnson quit on the team, resigned in 1999, and hand-selected Wannstedt as his successor, and the Dolphins have been ordinary (at best) ever since.



* The Oakland Raiders are worth mentioning. From 198294, the team played in Los Angeles. While it was no less successful during its Los Angeles days as it was during its time in Oakland, in hindsight it could easily be considered a DorkAge.
** They've been in one since 2003, after a curb-stomping by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII. In the ten seasons since, they haven't returned to the playoffs and only finished better than 5-11 three times, in 2010 and 2011 with 88 records, and 2015 at 79.

to:

* The After years of success in Oakland and Los Angeles, the Oakland Raiders are worth mentioning. From 198294, the team played in Los Angeles. While it was no less successful during its Los Angeles days as it was during its time in Oakland, in hindsight it could easily be considered entered a DorkAge.
** They've been in one since 2003,
Dork Age after a their 2003 curb-stomping by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII.XXXVII (Who were led by Jon Gruden, the head coach Al Davis practically gave away with contempt). In the ten seasons since, they haven't returned to the playoffs and only finished better than 5-11 three times, in 2010 and 2011 with 88 records, and 2015 at 79. All but the most apologetic NFL fans point to Al Davis' waning health and mental capabilities late in life, and his stubborn refusal step down as General Manager. Some fans think it actually started with Davis' falling out and eventual acrimonious split with running back Marcus Allen in 1993 (Allen left as a free agent and signed with the Raiders' bitter rival, Kansas City). Things have started turn around with Davis' son, Mark Davis, in control.


Added DiffLines:

* Nine of the ten American Football League teams have points of pride they can point to from the league's ten-year history. Six of the original eight won championships, Boston (now New England) had a Championship appearance in 1963 and sported several future Hall-of-Famers, Miami was the first AFL expansion team and brought pro football to Florida, and Cincinnati brought Paul Brown back to pro football. And then there's the Denver Broncos, who were the league's perennial doormat. The only team of the original eight to never post a winning season, they also had the additional stigma of sporting one of the [[http://blog.heritagesportsart.com/2010/08/denver-broncos-uniform-and-team-history.html all-time ugliest uniforms in all of pro sports]] for their first three years. Broncos fans tend not to EVER bring up their AFL years.
17th Jul '16 5:29:18 PM ryanasaurus0077
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Added DiffLines:

* Deflategate killed any chance of Roger Goodell being considered a successful NFL commissioner; as of the 2016 season, many who heard about Tom Brady's surrender now see the NFL as little more than an autocracy in which anything the commissioner says goes, which is bound to not bode well for the unlucky man who ends up having to fill Goodell's shoes later on, as Goodell's victory ended up setting in stone a very dangerous precedent, to put it lightly, and perhaps even foreshadowing darker times to come for anyone hoping to play in the NFL.
10th Jul '16 7:35:31 PM Rowdycmoore
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** Steve [=McClaren's=] tenure as England manager from 200607. A few good results in the first few Euro 2008 qualifiers soon gave way to failures to beat sides that they were easily beating under Eriksson, and what was widely regarded as England's worst-ever result when they needed a late goal to defeat ''Andorra'', the second-smallest country in UEFA. A couple of late wins and some freak results elsewhere gave England going into their final game... which instead resulted in the image of [=McClaren=] standing forlorn on the pitchside, holding a comically oversized umbrella and watching haplessly as his team was taken apart by Croatia. England failed to qualify, and [=McClaren=] was sacked the next morning, with a near-universal reputation as the single worst England manager ever.

to:

** Steve [=McClaren's=] tenure as England manager from 200607. A few good results in the first few Euro 2008 qualifiers soon gave way to failures to beat sides that they were easily beating under Eriksson, and what was widely regarded as England's worst-ever result when they needed a late goal to defeat ''Andorra'', the second-smallest country in UEFA. A couple of late wins and some freak results elsewhere gave England going into their final game... which instead resulted in the image of [=McClaren=] standing forlorn on the pitchside, holding a comically oversized umbrella and watching haplessly as his team was taken apart by Croatia. England failed to qualify, and [=McClaren=] was sacked the next morning, with a near-universal reputation as the single worst England manager ever.ever...
** And then came Roy Hodgson. Under him, England failed to make it out of the group stage at the 2014 World Cup, managing only one point in three games. And if the Brits thought ''that'' was an embarrassment - then came the 2016 Euros, where they were eliminated in the Round of 16 by ICELAND, a country that 1. has a population roughly the same size as Leicester, England's ELEVENTH largest city, 2. does not have a top-flight pro football league, and 3. their national team's assistant coach still worked full time as a dentist. Hodgson wrote up his resignation in the locker room immediately following that loss and announced it during the post-game press conference.
3rd Jul '16 3:16:24 AM 3rdStringPG
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** While some of the younger inaugural Bucs had potential (brothers Lee Roy and Dewey Selmon, both rookie defensive linemen out of Oklahoma) and some of the veterans (quarterback Steve Spurrier, defensive end Pat Toomay) had decent, if not stellar NFL careers beforehand, the team also had its share of players who'd be out of a job if not for the Bucs, and were often out of the NFL after their run with the Bucs ended. These included giant left tackle Steve Young (no, not THAT [[NamesTheSame Steve Young]] who replaced Joe Montana on the 49ers), 190-pound linebacker James "Psycho" Sims, who originally played defensive back at USC, and several ex-USC standouts coached by [=McKay=], including his slow, undersized wide receiver of a son, John [=McKay=] Jr., who, unsurprisingly, [[{{Nepotism}} was a starter]].

to:

** While some of the younger inaugural Bucs had potential (brothers Lee Roy and Dewey Selmon, both rookie defensive linemen out of Oklahoma) and some of the veterans (quarterback Steve Spurrier, defensive end Pat Toomay) had decent, if not stellar NFL careers beforehand, the team also had its share of players who'd be out of a job if not for the Bucs, and were often out of the NFL after their run with the Bucs ended. These included giant left tackle Steve Young (no, not THAT [[NamesTheSame Steve Young]] who replaced Joe Montana on the 49ers), 190-pound linebacker James "Psycho" Sims, who originally played defensive back at USC, and several other ex-USC standouts players coached by [=McKay=], including his slow, undersized wide receiver of a son, John [=McKay=] Jr., who, unsurprisingly, [[{{Nepotism}} was a starter]].
3rd Jul '16 3:13:54 AM 3rdStringPG
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** While some of the younger inaugural Bucs had potential (defensive linemen Lee Roy and Dewey Selmon) and some of the veterans (quarterback Steve Spurrier, defensive end Pat Toomay) had decent, if not stellar NFL careers beforehand, the team also had its share of players who'd be out of a job if not for the Bucs, and were often out of the NFL after their run with the Bucs ended. These included giant left tackle Steve Young (no, not THAT [[NamesTheSame Steve Young]] who replaced Joe Montana on the 49ers), 190-pound linebacker James "Psycho" Sims, who originally played defensive back at USC, and several ex-USC standouts coached by [=McKay=], including his slow, undersized wide receiver of a son, John [=McKay=] Jr., who, unsurprisingly, [[{{Nepotism}} was a starter]].

to:

** While some of the younger inaugural Bucs had potential (defensive linemen (brothers Lee Roy and Dewey Selmon) Selmon, both rookie defensive linemen out of Oklahoma) and some of the veterans (quarterback Steve Spurrier, defensive end Pat Toomay) had decent, if not stellar NFL careers beforehand, the team also had its share of players who'd be out of a job if not for the Bucs, and were often out of the NFL after their run with the Bucs ended. These included giant left tackle Steve Young (no, not THAT [[NamesTheSame Steve Young]] who replaced Joe Montana on the 49ers), 190-pound linebacker James "Psycho" Sims, who originally played defensive back at USC, and several ex-USC standouts coached by [=McKay=], including his slow, undersized wide receiver of a son, John [=McKay=] Jr., who, unsurprisingly, [[{{Nepotism}} was a starter]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DorkAge.Sports