History DorkAge / Music

28th Nov '16 11:14:36 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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* Music/{{Eminem}} on the albums ''Encore'' and ''Relapse''. His career peaked around 2002-03 with his fourth album ''Music/TheEminemShow'' and his film debut in ''Film/EightMile'' (a [[BasedOnATrueStory loose biopic]] of his upbringing), but by the time he began writing and recording ''Encore'', his drug problems had begun to overwhelm him. The resulting album, released in 2004, was seen as a critical misstep filled with juvenile lyrics, shallow pop-culture references, and a {{Flanderization}} of his persona. His follow-up ''Relapse'' in 2009 was intended as a comeback, but most critics thought it was just dull, going too far in the opposite direction. Eminem's actual comeback would come with ''Recovery'' in 2010 and ''The Marshall Mathers LP 2'' in 2013, and as of now he's restored much of his former popularity, putting his mid-late '00s Dork Age firmly behind him.

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* Music/{{Eminem}} on the albums ''Encore'' and ''Relapse''. His career peaked around 2002-03 with his fourth album ''Music/TheEminemShow'' and his film debut in ''Film/EightMile'' (a [[BasedOnATrueStory loose biopic]] of his upbringing), but by the time he began writing and recording ''Encore'', his drug problems had begun to overwhelm him. The resulting album, released in 2004, was seen as a critical misstep filled with juvenile lyrics, shallow (and [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece quickly dated]]) pop-culture references, and a {{Flanderization}} of his "Slim Shady" persona. His follow-up ''Relapse'' in 2009 was intended as a comeback, but most critics thought it was just dull, going too far in the opposite direction.direction and losing the sense of humor that set his best material apart. Eminem's actual comeback would come with ''Recovery'' in 2010 and ''The Marshall Mathers LP 2'' in 2013, and as of now he's restored much of his former popularity, putting his mid-late '00s Dork Age firmly behind him.
26th Nov '16 7:39:40 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* In the mid-'00s, Music/{{Powerman 5000}} decided to abandon their IndustrialMetal sound and their sci-fi fashion sense and image with the punk-influenced albums ''Transform'' in 2003 and ''Destroy What You Enjoy'' in 2006. While ''Transform'' has its fans, few will defend ''Destroy What You Enjoy'', which, tellingly, is the only one of their albums that is not carried on iTunes. That thankfully short-lived period ended with ''Somewhere on the Other Side of Nowhere'' in 2009.
18th Nov '16 7:38:19 PM RevolutionStone
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* Music/XJapan has been in one since 2008, with the possible exception of the 2010 Yokohama show, according to the part of the fandom that believes they stopped being good in 1992 or 1996.

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* Music/XJapan has been in one since 2008, with the possible exception of the 2010 Yokohama show, 2008 according to the part of the fandom that believes they stopped being good in 1992 or 1996.1996. Other fans think they were in a short one that ended around the 2010 Yokohama show or Lollapalooza, and others don't think they were ever in one.
28th Oct '16 6:27:28 PM Twentington
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* The output of Music/RascalFlatts after switching producers from Mark Bright to Dann Huff, covering the albums ''Me and My Gang'', ''Still Feels Good'', and ''Unstoppable''. While the PowerBallad "What Hurts the Most" was a critical darling and one of the few #1 country hits also to hit #1 on AC, the majority of their output for the next few years was very poorly received almost across the board. Pretty much all of their singles were bombastic, overproduced, over-sung power ballads with whiny, over-the-top vocals and lightweight lyrics, while at the same time, anything that ''wasn't'' in that mold ("Me and My Gang", "Bob That Head", "Why") inexplicably flopped. (However, at least ''Me and My Gang'' had a few truly good songs that many fans thought ''should'' be singles instead of what was actually released.) Even when they did score another chart-topper, it was quickly forgotten and never heard again even "Take Me There", which spent four weeks atop the country charts in an era where spending more than two weeks at #1 is a rarity on that chart. They didn't start to break out of their doldrums until their label (Lyric Street Records) closed in 2010 and they moved to Big Machine. Their first two Big Machine albums, while still produced by Huff, seemed to have the bombast dialed down a bit even if the hits aren't coming quite as strongly. The end of the Dork Age may have fully come with 2014's ''Rewind'', which has some tracks produced entirely by the band itself, a few by pop producer Howard Benson, and only one by Huff; many fans feel that this album is mostly free of the problems that most of their Huff albums had.

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* The output of Music/RascalFlatts entered one after switching producers from Mark Bright to Dann Huff, covering the albums ''Me and My Gang'', ''Still Feels Good'', and ''Unstoppable''. While Pretty much the PowerBallad only single off any of them that is almost universally seen as good is "What Hurts the Most" Most", the lead single to ''Me and My Gang'', which was a critical darling and one of the few #1 country hits also massive crossover to hit #1 on AC, the majority of their output for the next few years was very poorly received almost across the board. boot. Pretty much all of their other singles were bombastic, overproduced, over-sung power ballads with whiny, over-the-top vocals derided as either [[LoudnessWar bombastic and lightweight lyrics, while at the same time, anything that ''wasn't'' in that mold ("Me hideously overproduced]] {{power ballad}}s or extremely forced up-tempos like "Me and My Gang", "Summer Nights", or "Bob That Head", "Why") inexplicably flopped. (However, at least ''Me and My Gang'' had a few truly good songs that many fans thought ''should'' be singles instead of what Head" (which was actually released.) Even when they did score another chart-topper, it was quickly forgotten and never heard again even "Take Me There", which spent four weeks atop the country charts in an era where spending more than two weeks at #1 is a rarity on that chart. They didn't start to break out of their doldrums until first single not to hit Top 10, and is widely considered their label (Lyric Street Records) absolute worst overall). In addition, lead singer Gary [=LeVox=] was panned because of his extreme VocalEvolution into a [[CarefulWithThatAxe ridiculously high-pitched and loud]] style with hideous amounts of {{melisma|ticvocals}}. They started to reverse course when their label, Lyric Street, closed in 2010 and they moved to Big Machine. Their first two Big Machine albums, while ''Nothing Like This'' and ''Changed'', were generally seen as improvements even though Huff was still produced by Huff, seemed producing them. ''Rewind'' seems to have the bombast dialed down a bit even if the hits aren't coming quite as strongly. The end finally taken them out of the Dork Age may have fully come with 2014's ''Rewind'', which has some tracks produced entirely by Age, as the band itself, a few alternated between producing by pop themselves and with rock producer Howard Benson, and relegating Huff to only one by Huff; many fans feel that this album is mostly free of the problems that most of their Huff albums had.track.
28th Oct '16 6:09:18 PM Twentington
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* Whether Music/WeirdAlYankovic has ever had one of these is up to the individual fan (many fans like to joke that his losing the glasses, growing out his hair, and shaving his mustache is the closest he's come), but there are a sizable number who are seriously willing to dismiss everything from between ''Poodle Hat'' to ''Mandatory Fun Time'', when the parody songs became increasingly built around flash-in-the-pan singles ("Another Tattoo", for example, is a parody of the almost-unknown B.O.B./Bruno Mars "Nothing on You"). Not that this wasn't a problem before, but by ''MFT'', Al himself admitted he couldn't keep up with modern music on an album-recording schedule and abandoned albums entirely.

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* Whether Music/WeirdAlYankovic has ever had one of these is up to the individual fan (many fans like to joke that his losing the glasses, growing out his hair, and shaving his mustache is the closest he's come), but there are a sizable number who are seriously willing to dismiss everything from between ''Poodle Hat'' to ''Mandatory Fun Time'', Fun'', when the parody songs became increasingly built around flash-in-the-pan singles ("Another Tattoo", for example, is a parody of the almost-unknown B.O.B./Bruno Mars "Nothing on You"). Not that this wasn't a problem before, but by ''MFT'', Al himself admitted he couldn't keep up with modern music on an album-recording schedule and abandoned albums entirely.
30th Sep '16 4:58:31 PM MyFinalEdits
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** Again, all phases of the band's career have their fans; including the late-'70s period, "Blackmore Sabbath", and the Black Sabbath InNameOnly late '80s Tony Iommi solo albums.



* Hey, remember Music/{{KISS}}? When they first started they were regarded on the same level as the other two pioneering metal groups, Music/BlackSabbath and Music/LedZeppelin. They realized the potential for [[CashCowFranchise making a profit]], but overplayed their hand with a video game, a comic book series, and a universally-panned film. The whole thing culminated in the group attempting to cash in on the disco craze of the late 1970s, and they are today blamed for the downfall of the first generation of metal, leading to the rise of punk, hip-hop, and disco.

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* Hey, remember Music/{{KISS}}? When they first started they were regarded on the same level as the other two pioneering metal groups, Music/BlackSabbath and Music/LedZeppelin. They Music/{{KISS}}:
** The band
realized the potential for [[CashCowFranchise making a profit]], but overplayed their hand with a video game, a comic book series, and a universally-panned film. The whole thing culminated in the group attempting to cash in on the disco craze of the late 1970s, and they are today blamed for the downfall of the first generation of metal, leading to the rise of punk, hip-hop, and disco.



** Likewise, their attempt at a ConceptAlbum / RockOpera.

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** Likewise, their Their attempt at a ConceptAlbum / RockOpera.RockOpera was poorly received as well.



* Let's put this simple: the post-''Black Album'' period of Music/{{Metallica}} (''Load'', ''Reload'', ''St. Anger'') doesn't exist for [[BrokenBase many fans]]. Well, maybe ''Death Magnetic'' can be RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap (if you pirate the ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'' rip instead of getting the [[LoudnessWar atrociously-mastered]] CD), but anyways...

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* Let's put this simple: the The post-''Black Album'' period of Music/{{Metallica}} (''Load'', ''Reload'', ''St. Anger'') doesn't exist for [[BrokenBase many fans]]. Well, maybe ''Death Magnetic'' can be RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap (if you pirate the ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'' rip instead of getting the [[LoudnessWar atrociously-mastered]] CD), but anyways...



* Hell, even ''Music/{{Slayer}}'' wasn't immune to the crippling power that TheNineties had on metal. They lost [[TheAce their drummer Dave Lombardo]], and experimented with NuMetal for a while (something [[OldShame Kerry King himself openly wishes to forget]]). The horror! However, since the mid-[[TheNoughties Noughties]], Lombardo is back, and Slayer is making straight ThrashMetal again.
** Thought to be happening again. Jeff Hanneman (who was regarded as the best songwriter in the band) is dead and Lombardo's replacement, Paul Bostaph (who is a very good drummer himself, the hatred just comes from [[ToughActToFollow being compared to the man who pretty much wrote the metaphorical book on that style of drumming]]) has returned once again. The alleged circumstances behind Lombardo's departure have not helped matters.

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* Hell, even Even ''Music/{{Slayer}}'' wasn't immune to the crippling power that TheNineties had on metal. They lost [[TheAce their drummer Dave Lombardo]], and experimented with NuMetal for a while (something [[OldShame Kerry King himself openly wishes to forget]]). The horror! However, since the mid-[[TheNoughties Noughties]], Lombardo is back, and Slayer is making straight ThrashMetal again.
** Thought to be happening
again. Then, Jeff Hanneman (who was regarded as the best songwriter in the band) is dead passed away and Lombardo's replacement, Paul Bostaph (who is a very good drummer himself, the hatred just comes from [[ToughActToFollow being compared to the man who pretty much wrote the metaphorical book on that style of drumming]]) has returned once again. The alleged circumstances behind Lombardo's departure have not helped matters.



* Pat Boone, icon of whitebread, mocked this trope once by appearing at an event with Music/OzzyOsbourne's family in leather and with pierced nipples and temporary tattoos.
** He even released an album of metal covers, called ''In a Metal Mood: No More Mister Nice Guy'', performed in his signature whitebread style. His take of "Crazy Train" was used as the theme for ''Series/TheOsbournes'' (He and Ozzy were next door neighbors for many years until Ozzy and company moved shortly before the series' run). He's since claimed that his fanbase views that album as not just a DorkAge, but a ''Devil'' Age, and it actually resulted in him getting kicked out of his church for a while.
* Music/DuranDuran, contrary to myth, did continue its popularity in the wake of its "Fab Five" lineup being whittled down to Simon, Nick, and John, but the one album where their future was in serious jeopardy was with 1990's ''Liberty'', which while containing such fan-beloved songs as "Serious" and "My Antarctica", was the one moment when the band were at the brink of falling apart. Then they came back with 1993's ''The Wedding Album''. More recently, the period after the short-lived "Fab Five" reunion period brought forth a ''loathed'' element of Dork Age with ''Red Carpet Massacre'', which not only contained no songs of any musical merit but had Timbaland and Music/JustinTimberlake getting involved with the production of the album, which many die-hard fans simply could not stomach. Thankfully, they've gotten back their mojo with 2010's ''All You Need is Now'', produced by the much more appropriate Mark Ronson.

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* Pat Boone, icon of whitebread, mocked this trope once by appearing at an event with Music/OzzyOsbourne's family in leather and with pierced nipples and temporary tattoos.
**
tattoos. He even released an album of metal covers, called ''In a Metal Mood: No More Mister Nice Guy'', performed in his signature whitebread style. His take of "Crazy Train" was used as the theme for ''Series/TheOsbournes'' (He and Ozzy were next door neighbors for many years until Ozzy and company moved shortly before the series' run). He's since claimed that his fanbase views that album as not just a DorkAge, but a ''Devil'' Age, and it actually resulted in him getting kicked out of his church for a while.
* Music/DuranDuran, contrary to myth, did continue its popularity in the wake of its "Fab Five" lineup being whittled down to Simon, Nick, and John, but the one album where their future was in serious jeopardy was with 1990's ''Liberty'', which while containing such fan-beloved songs as "Serious" and "My Antarctica", was the one moment when the band were at the brink of falling apart. Then they came back with 1993's ''The Wedding Album''. More recently, Later on, the period after the short-lived "Fab Five" reunion period brought forth a ''loathed'' element of Dork Age with ''Red Carpet Massacre'', which not only contained no songs of any musical merit but had Timbaland and Music/JustinTimberlake getting involved with the production of the album, which many die-hard fans simply could not stomach. Thankfully, they've gotten back their mojo with 2010's ''All You Need is Now'', produced by the much more appropriate Mark Ronson.



* Music/{{Prince}}'s phase of replacing his name with a symbol and insistence on being called "[[TheTropeFormerlyKnownAsX the artist formerly known as Prince]]" resulted in his being labeled as a {{Cloudcuckoolander}}.
** The era following his split from long-time record label Warner Bros. (1996-2003) definitely counts. To recap, Prince started to release his album on his own "NPG Records" imprint with various distributors, his tours mainly catered to a small but dedicated hardcore crowd, and he started to experiment with different styles of music, mainly Jazz in the latter half. To top it all off, Prince converted to Jehovah's Witnesses near the end of the 90s and decided to stray away from the vulgar, sexual image he initially became known for. The age ended in 2004, first with a high profile appearance Opening the 2004 Grammys with Music/{{Beyonce}}, and second with his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. His 2004 album ''Musicology'' and its corresponding tour marked his return to the main stream and becoming an in-demand live act.

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* Music/{{Prince}}'s phase of replacing his name with a symbol and insistence on being called "[[TheTropeFormerlyKnownAsX the artist formerly known as Prince]]" resulted in his being labeled as a {{Cloudcuckoolander}}.
**
{{Cloudcuckoolander}}. The era following his split from long-time record label Warner Bros. (1996-2003) definitely counts. To recap, Prince started to release his album on his own "NPG Records" imprint with various distributors, his tours mainly catered to a small but dedicated hardcore crowd, and he started to experiment with different styles of music, mainly Jazz in the latter half. To top it all off, Prince converted to Jehovah's Witnesses near the end of the 90s and decided to stray away from the vulgar, sexual image he initially became known for. The age ended in 2004, first with a high profile appearance Opening the 2004 Grammys with Music/{{Beyonce}}, and second with his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. His 2004 album ''Musicology'' and its corresponding tour marked his return to the main stream and becoming an in-demand live act.



* Music/{{Aerosmith}}: After becoming one of America's most successful bands in the '70s, Aerosmith went through one of music's most famous examples in the '80s after Joe Perry and Brad Whitford's departures in 1979 and 1981 respectively. Their two albums released during this period, ''Night In The Ruts'' and ''Rock In A Hard Place'', don't exist in any greatest hits compilations. When Joe and Brad returned, they had fallen so far it took a hip-hop collaboration with Music/RunDMC and 1987's ''Permanent Vacation'' to return them back to the spotlight. Their success since then has managed to be greater than their '70s heyday, and is considered the greatest comeback story in popular music history.

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* Music/{{Aerosmith}}: Music/{{Aerosmith}}:
**
After becoming one of America's most successful bands in the '70s, Aerosmith went through one of music's most famous examples in the '80s after Joe Perry and Brad Whitford's departures in 1979 and 1981 respectively. Their two albums released during this period, ''Night In The Ruts'' and ''Rock In A Hard Place'', don't exist in any greatest hits compilations. When Joe and Brad returned, they had fallen so far it took a hip-hop collaboration with Music/RunDMC and 1987's ''Permanent Vacation'' to return them back to the spotlight. Their success since then has managed to be greater than their '70s heyday, and is considered the greatest comeback story in popular music history.



* Music/BillyIdol went through one of these in the early '90s. Faced with waning popularity and flagging album sales, he attempted to reinvent his image (and cash in on the emergent hacker[=/=]{{cyberpunk}} subculture) in 1993 by replacing his [[EightiesHair bleached-blonde spiky haircut]] with bleached-blonde dreadlocks and releasing the album ''Cyberpunk'', a fusion of glam rock and electronic dance music. With the exception of the single "Shock to the System" (which was closer in style to his earlier work), the album's songs consisted of overwrought synthesizer riffs, pretentious monologues, and lines lifted directly from Creator/WilliamGibson novels. The album flopped hard: critics universally panned it, Billy's old fans were left feeling betrayed, and real cyberpunks saw him as a hopeless poser. Even though the album has managed to acquire a cult following in recent years, it's still universally agreed that the cover of the Music/VelvetUnderground's "Heroin" that appeared on this album is the absolute ''worst'' version of the song ever recorded.

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* Music/BillyIdol went through one of these in the early '90s. Faced with waning popularity and flagging album sales, he attempted to reinvent his image (and cash in on the emergent hacker[=/=]{{cyberpunk}} subculture) in 1993 by replacing his [[EightiesHair bleached-blonde spiky haircut]] with bleached-blonde dreadlocks and releasing the album ''Cyberpunk'', a fusion of glam rock and electronic dance music. With the exception of the single "Shock to the System" (which was closer in style to his earlier work), the album's songs consisted of overwrought synthesizer riffs, pretentious monologues, and lines lifted directly from Creator/WilliamGibson novels. The album flopped hard: critics universally panned it, Billy's old fans were left feeling betrayed, and real cyberpunks saw him as a hopeless poser. Even though the album has managed to acquire a cult following in recent the following years, it's still universally agreed that the cover of the Music/VelvetUnderground's "Heroin" that appeared on this album is the absolute ''worst'' version of the song ever recorded.



* The period between frontman Syd Barrett's leaving Music/PinkFloyd in 1968 and the band releasing either 1971's ''Meddle'' or 1973's ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon'' is sometimes considered one of these. Understandable, since Barrett was responsible for virtually all of the band's material before he left. There is also a vocal part of the fanbase that considers the two albums from after Roger Waters left to be a Dork Age, though again, opinions differ considerably (generally, somewhat more bile is spewed at ''A Momentary Lapse of Reason'' than at ''The Division Bell'').
** Waters himself described ''Momentary Lapse'' as a "pretty fair forgery." Then again, Waters accused pretty much anything Gilmour did with the Floyd post-1985 as a "forgery" (except ''The Division Bell'', which was instead upgraded to "rubbish" and "nonsense from beginning to end"), given the band's in-fighting and power struggles. Waters' "Radio KAOS" from 1987 was equally '80s synth-driven, and later the production values became an OldShame to him.
* Many Music/{{Queen}} fans hate the disco album ''Hot Space'' with a passion. Releasing a {{disco}} album in 1982 proved to be a very poor move, and indeed it rendered them DeaderThanDisco [[AmericansHateTingle in the US]] for quite some time. The only song from it that most people will defend is "Under Pressure", the famous duet with Music/DavidBowie.
** Not only Queen fans hate it: both John Deacon and Roger Taylor expressed their dislike for it several times. On the other hand, Freddie virtually wrote its sequel for his debut solo project, and Brian[[note]]who also dislikes the album but argues that "Put Out The Fire" was a great song[[/note]] still claims that without it, there'd have been no [[Music/MichaelJackson "Thriller"]] (ridiculous as it sounds).
** Moreover, while most people tend to acknowledge "The Cosmos Rocks", some of the other activities Taylor have been involved with (e.g. recording with Britney Spears and 5ive) are treated as if they'd never happened. If only...

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* The period between frontman Syd Barrett's leaving Music/PinkFloyd in 1968 and the band releasing either 1971's ''Meddle'' or 1973's ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon'' is sometimes considered one of these. Understandable, since Barrett was responsible for virtually all of the band's material before he left. There is also a vocal part of the fanbase that considers the two albums from after Roger Waters left to be a Dork Age, though again, opinions differ considerably (generally, somewhat more bile is spewed at ''A Momentary Lapse of Reason'' than at ''The Division Bell''). \n** Waters himself described ''Momentary Lapse'' as a "pretty fair forgery." Then again, Waters accused pretty much anything Gilmour did with the Floyd post-1985 as a "forgery" (except ''The Division Bell'', which was instead upgraded to "rubbish" and "nonsense from beginning to end"), given the band's in-fighting and power struggles. Waters' "Radio KAOS" from 1987 was equally '80s synth-driven, and later the production values became an OldShame to him.
* Many Music/{{Queen}} fans hate the disco album ''Hot Space'' with a passion. Releasing a {{disco}} album in 1982 proved to be a very poor move, and indeed it rendered them DeaderThanDisco [[AmericansHateTingle in the US]] for quite some time. The only song from it that most people will defend is "Under Pressure", the famous duet with Music/DavidBowie.
** Not only Queen fans hate it: both
Music/DavidBowie. Both John Deacon and Roger Taylor also expressed their dislike for it several times. On the other hand, Freddie virtually wrote its sequel for his debut solo project, and Brian[[note]]who also dislikes the album but argues that "Put Out The Fire" was a great song[[/note]] still claims that without it, there'd have been no [[Music/MichaelJackson "Thriller"]] (ridiculous as it sounds).
**
sounds). Moreover, while most people tend to acknowledge "The Cosmos Rocks", some of the other activities Taylor have been involved with (e.g. recording with Britney Spears and 5ive) are treated as if they'd never happened. If only...



* Most fans of Music/TheSmashingPumpkins, despite differences in opinion on the recent material, would like to pretend that ''Zeitgeist'' [[FanonDiscontinuity never happened]].
** Billy Corgan's assertion that the existing concept of a band releasing an album is a dead one leading to his current ''Teargarden by Kaleidyscope'' releases may well prove to be a Dork Age in progress. Time will tell.

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* Most fans of Music/TheSmashingPumpkins, despite differences in opinion on the recent later material, would like to pretend that ''Zeitgeist'' [[FanonDiscontinuity never happened]].
**
happened]]. Billy Corgan's assertion that the existing concept of a band releasing an album is a dead one leading to his current ''Teargarden by Kaleidyscope'' releases may well prove to be a Dork Age in progress. Time will tell.progress.



* To most fans of the British [[PostPunk post-punk]] outfit Music/{{Wire}}, their early '90s output almost certainly qualifies. ''The Drill'', made up entirely of variations on the band's revolutionary 1985 track "Drill", is interesting in concept but tedious in execution; ''Manscape'', on the other hand, is a continuation of the band's explorations in MIDI technology and programmed rhythm. The latter is notable for being the album that prompted long-standing drummer Robert Gotobed to leave the group, thinking that he had been rendered obsolete, which led to the band changing their name and not releasing another album as Wire until 2000. Both [=LPs=] have their defenders, and few will say that ''Manscape'' is completely devoid of good material "Torch It!", "Children Of Groceries", and "You Hung Your Lights In The Trees" are all fairly popular among fans of the band but likewise even fewer will call them flawless or deny that they are extremely dated (a rare quality in Wire's output).
** Depending upon who you ask, Wire's post-Gotobed tenure as Wir (roughly 1991-1996) may qualify, although most agree that ''The First Letter'' was a massive step up from ''Manscape''. (It even got them a minor hit with "So and Slow It Grows".) More controversially, some fans of the band's earlier and later work will dismiss their entire '80s/'90s output as this, citing the excess of digital synths and slicker production.

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* To most fans of the British [[PostPunk post-punk]] outfit Music/{{Wire}}, their early '90s output almost certainly qualifies. qualifies.
**
''The Drill'', made up entirely of variations on the band's revolutionary 1985 track "Drill", is interesting in concept but tedious in execution; ''Manscape'', on the other hand, is a continuation of the band's explorations in MIDI technology and programmed rhythm. The latter is notable for being the album that prompted long-standing drummer Robert Gotobed to leave the group, thinking that he had been rendered obsolete, which led to the band changing their name and not releasing another album as Wire until 2000. Both [=LPs=] have their defenders, and few will say that ''Manscape'' is completely devoid of good material "Torch It!", "Children Of Groceries", and "You Hung Your Lights In The Trees" are all fairly popular among fans of the band but likewise even fewer will call them flawless or deny that they are extremely dated (a rare quality in Wire's output).
** Depending upon who you ask, Wire's post-Gotobed tenure as Wir (roughly 1991-1996) may qualify, although most agree that ''The First Letter'' was a massive step up from ''Manscape''. (It even got them a minor hit with "So and Slow It Grows".) Grows"). More controversially, some fans of the band's earlier and later work will dismiss their entire '80s/'90s output as this, citing the excess of digital synths and slicker production.



* Most instances of TheBandMinusTheFace qualify.
13th Sep '16 9:04:04 PM ThatBitterTase
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* On a lighter note, some fans feel that Music/WeirdAlYankovic entered an aesthetic Dork Age after he got LASIK surgery, got rid of his glasses, grew out his hair, and ''shaved his mustache''. *GASP!*

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* On a lighter note, some fans feel that Whether Music/WeirdAlYankovic entered an aesthetic Dork Age after he got LASIK surgery, got rid has ever had one of these is up to the individual fan (many fans like to joke that his losing the glasses, grew growing out his hair, and ''shaved shaving his mustache''. *GASP!*mustache is the closest he's come), but there are a sizable number who are seriously willing to dismiss everything from between ''Poodle Hat'' to ''Mandatory Fun Time'', when the parody songs became increasingly built around flash-in-the-pan singles ("Another Tattoo", for example, is a parody of the almost-unknown B.O.B./Bruno Mars "Nothing on You"). Not that this wasn't a problem before, but by ''MFT'', Al himself admitted he couldn't keep up with modern music on an album-recording schedule and abandoned albums entirely.
12th Jul '16 4:01:10 AM Q4
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Added DiffLines:

* Music/{{Slade}}'s Dork Age started with the 1976 album "Nobody's Fools", a calculated attempt to appeal to American tastes (inspired by soul, blues rock and folk rock) which completely backfired, not only failing to find an audience in the States, but also all but destroying their career in the UK and Europe. The next four years would see a succession of desperate and often bizarre attempts at re-engaging the mainstream audience - Elvis covers, a football record, even notoriously the "Okey Cokey" - before their set at the 1980 Reading Festival brought them to a new hard rock / metal audience and a career resurrection that lasted into the mid-80s.
21st May '16 5:19:42 AM NiGHTS
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* Music/IronMaiden helmed by Blaze Bayley. The band continued to write good material during this time (some songs from those albums remained in the setlist after he left), and Blaze is a fine singer on his own. But, because of the difference in vocal range, he had a hard time performing the band's earlier material live. Blaze is a baritone, while Bruce Dickinson is a tenor, which is more usual for metal vocalists. A few fans add the two albums before as well, as they lacked guitarist Adrian Smith and had some subpar material and attempts on DarkerAndEdgier (such as raspier vocals) that didn't sit well with them.

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* Music/IronMaiden helmed by Blaze Bayley. The band continued to write good material during this time (some songs from those albums remained in the setlist after he left), and Blaze is a fine singer on his own. But, because of the difference in vocal range, range (Blaze is a baritone, whereas Bruce Dickinson is a tenor, which is more usual for metal vocalists), he had a hard time performing the band's earlier material live. Blaze is a baritone, while Bruce Dickinson is a tenor, which is more usual for metal vocalists.live. A few fans add the two albums before as well, as they lacked guitarist Adrian Smith and had some subpar material and attempts on DarkerAndEdgier (such as raspier vocals) that didn't sit well with them.
18th Apr '16 9:56:56 PM aye_amber
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* Poor, poor Music/MachineHead. In the mid '90s, they were one of the pioneers of the "post-thrash" sound that defined underground American metal during the decade along with Music/{{Pantera}}, Fear Factory, Music/{{Sepultura}}, Music/{{Biohazard}}, Music/LifeOfAgony, and many others. While other bands were emphasizing influences such as {{Industrial}}, {{Funk|Metal}}, {{Hardcore}}, and {{Grunge}}, Machine Head's sound was planted ''firmly'' in {{Thrash|Metal}}, yet still sounding both modern ''and'' timeless. Until 1999's ''The Burning Red'', which showcased a ''drastic'' shift into NuMetal on both an aural and [[ImportantHaircut visual]] level, and the quality of songwiting suffered greatly from the creative dissonance involved. [[FromBadToWorse To make matters even worse]], they/[[IAmTheBand Rob Flynn]] put out a followup up called ''Supercharger'' that was ''even worse'' on these accounts.\\\

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* Poor, poor Music/MachineHead. In the mid '90s, they were one of the pioneers of the "post-thrash" sound that defined underground American metal during the decade along with Music/{{Pantera}}, Fear Factory, Music/{{Sepultura}}, Music/{{Biohazard}}, Music/LifeOfAgony, ''Life of Agony,'' and many others. While other bands were emphasizing influences such as {{Industrial}}, {{Funk|Metal}}, {{Hardcore}}, and {{Grunge}}, Machine Head's sound was planted ''firmly'' in {{Thrash|Metal}}, yet still sounding both modern ''and'' timeless. Until 1999's ''The Burning Red'', which showcased a ''drastic'' shift into NuMetal on both an aural and [[ImportantHaircut visual]] level, and the quality of songwiting suffered greatly from the creative dissonance involved. [[FromBadToWorse To make matters even worse]], they/[[IAmTheBand Rob Flynn]] put out a followup up called ''Supercharger'' that was ''even worse'' on these accounts.\\\
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DorkAge.Music