History DorkAge / Music

16th Mar '17 9:30:07 AM Vorhias
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* Opinions differ on whether this applies to Music/TheyMightBeGiants and their move away from their classic backing tape sound into a full band during the mid-90s. After the critical and commercial success of the albums ''Flood'' and ''Apollo 18'' they recruited live backing musicians for the release of 94's ''John Henry'' and 96's ''Factory Showroom." Fan and critical opinions of the records were muted at the time of their release, and due to their label Elektra's inability to market the albums they were not commercial successes. (As time has gone by both albums have gained increased respect from TMBG's fanbase, with guitarist John Flansburgh going on record to state that ''Factory Showroom'' is his favorite band release.) By the early 00's the band had worked the kinks out of their new sound, and went on to new acclaim from critics and fans, culminating in their first Billboard Top 40-charting album, 2012's ''Join Us.''

to:

* Opinions differ on whether this applies to Music/TheyMightBeGiants and their move away from their classic backing tape sound into a full band during the mid-90s. After the critical and commercial success of the albums ''Flood'' and ''Apollo 18'' they recruited live backing musicians for the release of 94's ''John Henry'' and 96's ''Factory Showroom." '' Fan and critical opinions of the records were muted at the time of their release, and due to their label Elektra's inability to market the albums they were not commercial successes. (As time has gone by both albums have gained increased respect from TMBG's fanbase, with guitarist John Flansburgh going on record to state that ''Factory Showroom'' is his favorite band release.) By the early 00's the band had worked the kinks out of their new sound, and went on to new acclaim from critics and fans, culminating in their first Billboard Top 40-charting album, 2012's ''Join Us.''
16th Mar '17 9:29:43 AM Vorhias
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* Opinions differ on whether this applies to Music/TheyMightBeGiants and their move away from their classic backing tape sound into a full band during the mid-90s. After the critical and commercial success of the albums ''Flood'' and ''Apollo 18'' they recruited live backing musicians for the release of 94's ''John Henry'' and 96's ''Factory Showroom." Fan and critical opinions of the records were muted at the time of their release, and due to their label Elektra's inability to market the albums they were not commercial successes. (As time has gone by both albums have gained increased respect from TMBG's fanbase, with guitarist John Flansburgh going on record to state that ''Factory Showroom'' is his favorite band release.) By the early 00's the band had worked the kinks out of their new sound, and went on to new acclaim from critics and fans, culminating in their first Billboard Top 40-charting album, 2012's ''Join Us.''
16th Mar '17 9:13:53 AM Vorhias
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* Though its reviews were comparable to those of their earlier work, Music/LinkinPark's fans trashed their 2007 album ''Minutes to Midnight'', which almost fully abandoned [[RapMetal their use of rapping and turntables]]. 2010's ''A Thousand Suns'' proved even more polarizing with the experimental direction it took in both its sound and its themes. The genre shift is known by fans as a Dork Age, though few of those remaining since those albums' release have left since, mainly due to the band [[WinBackTheCrowd returning to familiar territory]] with ''Living Things'' in 2012 and especially ''The Hunting Party'' in 2014.

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* Though its reviews were comparable to those of their earlier work, Music/LinkinPark's fans trashed their 2007 album ''Minutes to Midnight'', which almost fully abandoned [[RapMetal their use of rapping and turntables]]. 2010's ''A Thousand Suns'' proved even more polarizing with the experimental direction it took in both its sound and its themes. The genre shift is known by fans as a Dork Age, though few of those remaining since those albums' release have left since, mainly due to the band [[WinBackTheCrowd returning to familiar territory]] with ''Living Things'' in 2012 and especially ''The Hunting Party'' in 2014. (Some would argue this period is itself a Dork Age for the band's increased incorporation of mainstream-EDM influences.)
19th Dec '16 7:05:46 PM Twentington
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* Music/GarthBrooks' ''Music/InTheLifeOfChrisGaines'', an experimental alt-rock album and pre-release soundtrack for a movie that never was, did not go over well with his fandom. Not only was the OutOfGenreExperience unwelcome to his country fans, but taking on a new look and the identity of the title character just made it worse. Even still, while the album bombed, failure is relative. The album itself peaked at #2 on the U.S. charts, went double platinum, and had a top 5 single.
* Music/BrooksAndDunn have their 1999 ''Tight Rope'' album. Following their biggest flop to date with "South of Santa Fe" (their only single not to enter the Top 40 at all, reportedly because program directors were saying they didn't want another song with Kix Brooks singing lead instead of Ronnie Dunn), they led off ''Tight Rope'' with a lukewarm cover of John Waite's "Missing You" (obviously trying to re-capture the magic of their extremely successful cover of B. W. Stevenson's "My Maria") and the honky-tonk "Beer Thirty". Both failed to make Top 10, while "You'll Always Be Loved by Me" very, very slowly climbed to Top 5 in 2000. The album was their worst-selling, and was critically panned for sounding tired and weak overall. It was their last album under original producer Don Cook (and one of his last production gigs period), although he only produced half of it; the other half, including all three singles, was produced by Music/TimMcGraw's producer Byron Gallimore, with whom the duo never worked again. The fall was so great that Montgomery Gentry snagged the Duo of the Year awards that year despite being brand-new on the scene. Fortunately for B & D, they caught a second wind with ''Steers & Stripes'' in 2001 (their first album with producer Mark Wright), which accounted for their biggest hit in "Ain't Nothing 'Bout You" and was generally lauded for its more energetic sound and tight songwriting. ''Red Dirt Road'' two years later was also hailed as one of their best. When B & D released their second GreatestHitsAlbum in 2004, ''none'' of the singles from ''Tight Rope'' were included, even though they ''did'' include "South of Santa Fe"!

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* Music/GarthBrooks' ''Music/InTheLifeOfChrisGaines'', an experimental alt-rock album and pre-release soundtrack for a movie that never was, did not go over well with his fandom. Not only was the OutOfGenreExperience unwelcome to his country fans, but taking on a new look and the identity of the title character just made it worse. Even still, while the album bombed, failure is relative. The album itself peaked at #2 on the U.S. charts, went double platinum, and had a top 5 single.
most bizarrely of all, produced Garth's ''only'' trip to the Top 40 of the Hot 100.
* Music/BrooksAndDunn have their 1999 ''Tight Rope'' album. Following their biggest flop to date with "South of Santa Fe" (their only single not to enter the Top 40 at all, reportedly because program directors were saying they didn't want another song with Kix Brooks singing lead instead of Ronnie Dunn), they led off ''Tight Rope'' with a lukewarm cover of John Waite's "Missing You" (obviously trying to re-capture the magic of their extremely successful cover of B. W. Stevenson's "My Maria") and the honky-tonk "Beer Thirty". Both failed to make Top 10, while "You'll Always Be Loved by Me" very, very slowly climbed crawled to Top 5 in 2000. The album was their worst-selling, and was critically panned for sounding tired and weak overall. It was their last album under original producer Don Cook (and one of his last production gigs period), although he only produced half of it; the other half, including all three singles, was produced by Music/TimMcGraw's producer Byron Gallimore, with whom the duo never worked again. The fall was so great that Montgomery Gentry snagged the Duo of the Year awards that year despite being brand-new on the scene. Even the members themselves admitted they were close to breaking up because they felt they had run their course. Fortunately for B & D, they caught a second wind with "Ain't Nothing 'bout You" in 2001, which became their biggest hit to date. Its corresponding album ''Steers & Stripes'' in 2001 (their first album with producer Mark Wright), which accounted for their biggest hit in "Ain't Nothing 'Bout You" and was generally lauded for its more energetic sound and tight songwriting. followup ''Red Dirt Road'' two years later was also hailed as one of were huge successes commercially and critically, putting them back on track until their best.2011 retirement. When B & D released their second GreatestHitsAlbum in 2004, ''none'' of the singles from ''Tight Rope'' were included, even though they ''did'' include "South of Santa Fe"!



* Music/RascalFlatts entered one after switching producers from Mark Bright to Dann Huff, covering the albums ''Me and My Gang'', ''Still Feels Good'', and ''Unstoppable''. Pretty much the only single off any of them that is almost universally seen as good is "What Hurts the Most", the lead single to ''Me and My Gang'', which was a massive crossover to boot. Pretty much all of their other singles were derided as either [[LoudnessWar bombastic and hideously overproduced]] {{power ballad}}s (not too dissimilar to what Huff had previously done with Lonestar a few years earlier) or extremely forced up-tempos like "Me and My Gang", "Summer Nights", or "Bob That Head" (which was their first single not to hit Top 10, and is widely considered their absolute worst overall). In addition, lead singer Gary [=LeVox=] was panned because of his extreme VocalEvolution into a [[CarefulWithThatAxe ridiculously high-pitched and loud]] style with hideous amounts of {{melisma|ticvocals}}. They started to reverse course when their label, Lyric Street, closed in 2010 and they moved to Big Machine. Their first two Big Machine albums, ''Nothing Like This'' and ''Changed'', were generally seen as improvements even though Huff was still producing them. ''Rewind'' seems to have finally taken them out of the Dork Age, as the band alternated between producing by themselves and with rock producer Howard Benson, relegating Huff to only one track.

to:

* Music/RascalFlatts entered one after switching producers from Mark Bright to Dann Huff, covering the albums ''Me and My Gang'', ''Still Feels Good'', and ''Unstoppable''. Pretty much the only single off any of them that is almost universally seen as good is "What Hurts the Most", the lead single to ''Me and My Gang'', which was a massive their biggest crossover to boot. hit. Pretty much all of their other singles were derided as either [[LoudnessWar bombastic and hideously overproduced]] {{power ballad}}s (not too dissimilar to what Huff had previously done with Lonestar a few years earlier) or extremely forced up-tempos like "Me and My Gang", "Summer Nights", or "Bob That Head" (which was their (their first single not to hit Top top 10, and is widely considered their absolute worst overall).overall due to both AccidentalInnuendo and an ear-splitting CarefulWithThatAxe intro). In addition, lead singer Gary [=LeVox=] was panned because of his extreme VocalEvolution into a [[CarefulWithThatAxe ridiculously high-pitched and loud]] style with hideous amounts of {{melisma|ticvocals}}. They started to reverse course when their label, Lyric Street, closed in 2010 and they moved to Big Machine. Their first two Big Machine albums, ''Nothing Like This'' and ''Changed'', were generally seen as improvements even though Huff was still producing them. ''Rewind'' seems to have finally taken them out of the Dork Age, as the band alternated between producing by themselves and with rock producer Howard Benson, relegating Huff to only one track.
19th Dec '16 7:00:30 PM Twentington
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* Music/RascalFlatts entered one after switching producers from Mark Bright to Dann Huff, covering the albums ''Me and My Gang'', ''Still Feels Good'', and ''Unstoppable''. Pretty much the only single off any of them that is almost universally seen as good is "What Hurts the Most", the lead single to ''Me and My Gang'', which was a massive crossover to boot. Pretty much all of their other singles were derided as either [[LoudnessWar bombastic and hideously overproduced]] {{power ballad}}s or extremely forced up-tempos like "Me and My Gang", "Summer Nights", or "Bob That Head" (which was their first single not to hit Top 10, and is widely considered their absolute worst overall). In addition, lead singer Gary [=LeVox=] was panned because of his extreme VocalEvolution into a [[CarefulWithThatAxe ridiculously high-pitched and loud]] style with hideous amounts of {{melisma|ticvocals}}. They started to reverse course when their label, Lyric Street, closed in 2010 and they moved to Big Machine. Their first two Big Machine albums, ''Nothing Like This'' and ''Changed'', were generally seen as improvements even though Huff was still producing them. ''Rewind'' seems to have finally taken them out of the Dork Age, as the band alternated between producing by themselves and with rock producer Howard Benson, relegating Huff to only one track.

to:

* Music/{{Lonestar}} went into one around the first decade of the 21st century. After their 1999 smash hit "Amazed" became the first song since 1983 to top both the country and Hot 100 charts, the label pushed for more bombastic ballads of its ilk, and more sentimental fare after 2001's "I'm Already There" was almost as big a hit. This resulted in what had formerly been a hot honky-tonk influenced country band getting pushed into theatrical, bombastic, TastesLikeDiabetes fare. Once such songs started producing diminishing returns, the band quit its label, and lead singer Richie [=McDonald=] went solo for a while. The DorkAge was only exacerbated by new lead singer Cody Collins simply not fitting in with the band, so Richie returned in 2011. While the band has long since stopped having hits, consensus is that their material since Richie's return has at least started getting better again.
* Music/RascalFlatts entered one after switching producers from Mark Bright to Dann Huff, covering the albums ''Me and My Gang'', ''Still Feels Good'', and ''Unstoppable''. Pretty much the only single off any of them that is almost universally seen as good is "What Hurts the Most", the lead single to ''Me and My Gang'', which was a massive crossover to boot. Pretty much all of their other singles were derided as either [[LoudnessWar bombastic and hideously overproduced]] {{power ballad}}s (not too dissimilar to what Huff had previously done with Lonestar a few years earlier) or extremely forced up-tempos like "Me and My Gang", "Summer Nights", or "Bob That Head" (which was their first single not to hit Top 10, and is widely considered their absolute worst overall). In addition, lead singer Gary [=LeVox=] was panned because of his extreme VocalEvolution into a [[CarefulWithThatAxe ridiculously high-pitched and loud]] style with hideous amounts of {{melisma|ticvocals}}. They started to reverse course when their label, Lyric Street, closed in 2010 and they moved to Big Machine. Their first two Big Machine albums, ''Nothing Like This'' and ''Changed'', were generally seen as improvements even though Huff was still producing them. ''Rewind'' seems to have finally taken them out of the Dork Age, as the band alternated between producing by themselves and with rock producer Howard Benson, relegating Huff to only one track.
18th Dec '16 9:51:53 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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* Music/GreenDay, a band that's been going strong for well over twenty years, has some albums that aren't as fondly remembered as others.
** Their 2000 album ''Music/{{Warning}}'' was considered to be this at the time of its release, its GenreShift into {{Folk|Music}}, SkaPunk, and SurfRock as opposed to the PopPunk that made them famous leaving longtime fans polarized and the band fading from mainstream popularity. However, it's since come to be VindicatedByHistory for its songwriting, with "Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)" seen as one of the band's signature ballads.
** Nowadays, fans generally view the ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' trilogy of albums in 2012 as Green Day's creative low point. Coming off of their CareerResurrection in the mid-late '00s with ''Music/AmericanIdiot'' and ''Music/TwentyFirstCenturyBreakdown'', the three albums marked the band's most ambitious undertaking to date, with each album a GenreThrowback to a different style of classic rock (PowerPop, GarageRock, and ArenaRock respectively). However, critics and fans alike saw the project as a regression from the themes of their two prior {{concept album}}s back into juvenilia and adolescent angst, which came off as far less convincing when all of the band's members were pushing forty. The staggered release schedule of the three albums (they were all released separately within weeks of one another, rather than as one triple-album) also prevented singles from gaining traction on the radio before a new bunch of Green Day songs came to push them off. Even Billie Joe Armstrong sees ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' as an OldShame, saying that the band was directionless and [[https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/green_days_armstrong_admits_it_uno_dos_tre_trilogy_is_crap.html "prolific for the sake of it"]] and arguing that his drug abuse at the time affected the albums' quality. Their 2016 follow-up ''Revolution Radio'' wasn't particularly acclaimed, but it was still seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]], and they and their fans haven't looked back.



* Music/GreenDay, a band that's been going strong for well over twenty years, has some albums that aren't as fondly remembered as others.
** Their 2000 album ''Music/{{Warning}}'' was considered to be this at the time of its release, its GenreShift into {{Folk|Music}}, SkaPunk, and SurfRock as opposed to the PopPunk that made them famous leaving longtime fans polarized and the band fading from mainstream popularity. However, it's since come to be VindicatedByHistory for its songwriting, with "Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)" seen as one of the band's signature ballads.
** Nowadays, fans generally view the ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' trilogy of albums in 2012 as Green Day's creative low point. Coming off of their CareerResurrection in the mid-late '00s with ''Music/AmericanIdiot'' and ''Music/TwentyFirstCenturyBreakdown'', the three albums marked the band's most ambitious undertaking to date, with each album a GenreThrowback to a different style of classic rock (PowerPop, GarageRock, and ArenaRock respectively), but for critics and listeners alike, the project marked a regression from the themes of their two prior {{concept album}}s back into juvenilia and adolescent angst, which came off as far less convincing when all three of the band's members were turning forty that year. The staggered release schedule of the three albums (they were all released separately within weeks of one another, rather than as one triple-album) also prevented singles from gaining traction on the radio before a new bunch of Green Day songs came to push them off. Even Billie Joe Armstrong sees ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' as an OldShame, saying that the band was directionless and [[https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/green_days_armstrong_admits_it_uno_dos_tre_trilogy_is_crap.html "prolific for the sake of it"]] and arguing that his drug abuse at the time affected the albums' quality. Their 2016 follow-up ''Revolution Radio'' wasn't particularly acclaimed, but it was still seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]], and they and their fans haven't looked back.
18th Dec '16 9:49:03 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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** Nowadays, fans generally view the ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' trilogy of albums in 2012 as Green Day's creative low point. Coming off of their CareerResurrection in the mid-late '00s with ''Music/AmericanIdiot'' and ''Music/TwentyFirstCenturyBreakdown'', the three albums marked the band's most ambitious undertaking to date, but for critics and listeners alike, the project marked a regression from the themes of their two prior {{concept album}}s back into juvenilia and adolescent angst, which came off as far less convincing when all three of the band's members were turning forty that year. The staggered release schedule of the three albums also prevented singles from gaining traction on the radio before a new bunch of Green Day songs came to push them off. Even Billie Joe Armstrong sees ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' as an OldShame, saying that the band was directionless and [[https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/green_days_armstrong_admits_it_uno_dos_tre_trilogy_is_crap.html "prolific for the sake of it"]] and arguing that his drug abuse at the time affected the albums' quality. Their 2016 follow-up ''Revolution Radio'' wasn't particularly acclaimed, but it was still seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]], and they and their fans haven't looked back.

to:

** Nowadays, fans generally view the ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' trilogy of albums in 2012 as Green Day's creative low point. Coming off of their CareerResurrection in the mid-late '00s with ''Music/AmericanIdiot'' and ''Music/TwentyFirstCenturyBreakdown'', the three albums marked the band's most ambitious undertaking to date, with each album a GenreThrowback to a different style of classic rock (PowerPop, GarageRock, and ArenaRock respectively), but for critics and listeners alike, the project marked a regression from the themes of their two prior {{concept album}}s back into juvenilia and adolescent angst, which came off as far less convincing when all three of the band's members were turning forty that year. The staggered release schedule of the three albums (they were all released separately within weeks of one another, rather than as one triple-album) also prevented singles from gaining traction on the radio before a new bunch of Green Day songs came to push them off. Even Billie Joe Armstrong sees ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' as an OldShame, saying that the band was directionless and [[https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/green_days_armstrong_admits_it_uno_dos_tre_trilogy_is_crap.html "prolific for the sake of it"]] and arguing that his drug abuse at the time affected the albums' quality. Their 2016 follow-up ''Revolution Radio'' wasn't particularly acclaimed, but it was still seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]], and they and their fans haven't looked back.
17th Dec '16 7:04:51 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* Music/{{Eminem}} on the albums ''Encore'' and ''Relapse''. His career peaked around 2002-03 with his fourth album ''Music/TheEminemShow'' and his film debut in ''Film/EightMile'' (a [[BasedOnATrueStory loose biopic]] of his upbringing), but by the time he began writing and recording ''Encore'', his drug problems had begun to overwhelm him. The resulting album, released in 2004, was seen as a critical misstep filled with juvenile lyrics, shallow (and [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece quickly dated]]) pop-culture references, and a {{Flanderization}} of his "Slim Shady" persona. His follow-up ''Relapse'' in 2009 was intended as a comeback, but most critics thought it was just dull, going too far in the opposite direction and losing the sense of humor that set his best material apart. Eminem's actual comeback would come with ''Recovery'' in 2010 and ''The Marshall Mathers LP 2'' in 2013, and as of now he's restored much of his former popularity, putting his mid-late '00s Dork Age firmly behind him.

to:

* Music/{{Eminem}} on the albums ''Encore'' and ''Relapse''. His career peaked around 2002-03 with his fourth album ''Music/TheEminemShow'' and his film debut in ''Film/EightMile'' (a [[BasedOnATrueStory loose biopic]] of his upbringing), but by the time he began writing and recording ''Encore'', his drug problems had begun to overwhelm him. The resulting album, released in 2004, was seen as a critical misstep filled with juvenile lyrics, shallow (and [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece quickly dated]]) pop-culture references, and a {{Flanderization}} of [[ADarkerMe his "Slim Shady" persona.persona]]. His follow-up ''Relapse'' in 2009 was intended as a comeback, but most critics thought it was just dull, going too far in the opposite direction and losing the sense of humor that set his best material apart. Eminem's actual comeback would come with ''Recovery'' in 2010 and ''The Marshall Mathers LP 2'' in 2013, and as of now he's restored much of his former popularity, putting his mid-late '00s Dork Age firmly behind him.
17th Dec '16 5:59:45 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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** Nowadays, fans generally view the ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' trilogy of albums in 2012 as Green Day's creative low point. Coming off of their CareerResurrection in the mid-late '00s with ''Music/AmericanIdiot'' and ''Music/TwentyFirstCenturyBreakdown'', the three albums marked the band's most ambitious undertaking to date, but for critics and listeners alike, the project marked a regression from the themes of their two prior {{concept album}}s back into juvenilia and adolescent angst, which came off as far less convincing when all three of the band's members were turning forty that year. The staggered release schedule of the three albums also prevented singles from gaining traction on the radio before a new bunch of Green Day songs came to push them off. Even Billie Joe Armstrong sees ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' as an OldShame, saying that the band was directionless and [[https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/green_days_armstrong_admits_it_uno_dos_tre_trilogy_is_crap.html "prolific for the sake of it"]] and arguing that his drug abuse at the time affected the albums' quality. The band returned to form in 2016 with ''Revolution Radio'' (even if few will argue that it's their best album), and they and their fans haven't looked back.

to:

** Nowadays, fans generally view the ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' trilogy of albums in 2012 as Green Day's creative low point. Coming off of their CareerResurrection in the mid-late '00s with ''Music/AmericanIdiot'' and ''Music/TwentyFirstCenturyBreakdown'', the three albums marked the band's most ambitious undertaking to date, but for critics and listeners alike, the project marked a regression from the themes of their two prior {{concept album}}s back into juvenilia and adolescent angst, which came off as far less convincing when all three of the band's members were turning forty that year. The staggered release schedule of the three albums also prevented singles from gaining traction on the radio before a new bunch of Green Day songs came to push them off. Even Billie Joe Armstrong sees ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' as an OldShame, saying that the band was directionless and [[https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/green_days_armstrong_admits_it_uno_dos_tre_trilogy_is_crap.html "prolific for the sake of it"]] and arguing that his drug abuse at the time affected the albums' quality. The band returned to form in Their 2016 with follow-up ''Revolution Radio'' (even if few will argue that it's their best album), wasn't particularly acclaimed, but it was still seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]], and they and their fans haven't looked back.
17th Dec '16 5:54:07 PM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Nowadays, fans generally view the ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' trilogy of albums in 2012 as Green Day's creative low point. Coming off of their CareerResurrection in the mid-late '00s with ''Music/AmericanIdiot'' and ''Music/TwentyFirstCenturyBreakdown'', the three albums marked the band's most ambitious undertaking to date, but for critics and listeners alike, the project marked a regression from the themes of their two prior {{concept album}}s back into juvenilia and adolescent angst, which came off as far less convincing when all three of the band's members were turning forty that year. The staggered release schedule of the three albums also prevented singles from gaining traction on the radio before a new bunch of Green Day songs came to push them off. Even Billie Joe Armstrong sees ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' as an OldShame, saying that the band was directionless and [[https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/green_days_armstrong_admits_it_uno_dos_tre_trilogy_is_crap.html "prolific for the sake of it"]] and arguing that his drug abuse at the time affected the albums' quality. The band returned to form in 2016 with ''Revolution Radio'', and fans haven't looked back.

to:

** Nowadays, fans generally view the ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' trilogy of albums in 2012 as Green Day's creative low point. Coming off of their CareerResurrection in the mid-late '00s with ''Music/AmericanIdiot'' and ''Music/TwentyFirstCenturyBreakdown'', the three albums marked the band's most ambitious undertaking to date, but for critics and listeners alike, the project marked a regression from the themes of their two prior {{concept album}}s back into juvenilia and adolescent angst, which came off as far less convincing when all three of the band's members were turning forty that year. The staggered release schedule of the three albums also prevented singles from gaining traction on the radio before a new bunch of Green Day songs came to push them off. Even Billie Joe Armstrong sees ''¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré!'' as an OldShame, saying that the band was directionless and [[https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/general_music_news/green_days_armstrong_admits_it_uno_dos_tre_trilogy_is_crap.html "prolific for the sake of it"]] and arguing that his drug abuse at the time affected the albums' quality. The band returned to form in 2016 with ''Revolution Radio'', Radio'' (even if few will argue that it's their best album), and they and their fans haven't looked back.
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