History DorkAge / LiveActionTV

22nd Jul '17 4:31:30 AM BNSF1995
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** Series 6 Part 2 of the revival ("Let's Kill Hitler" through "The Wedding of River Song") is considered this by a lot of the fandom. The "Silence Will Fall" story arc was very well-received in Series 5, which introduced the Eleventh Doctor and is still widely thought of as the best series of the Moffat era. But in Series 6 the story arc became more confusing, and the SeasonFinale was regarded as unsatisfying -- in part because it left ''a lot'' of the storyline unexplained. From there, Series 7 tried to move away from the Silence arc, but then introduced the related Great Intelligence/Impossible Girl arc in its second half. The Silence arc was ''finally'' wrapped up in the post-season ChristmasEpisode, but it was an underwhelming end for Eleven. In addition, there is an argument over at SeasonalRot that Series 8, the Twelfth Doctor's first season, continued this dork age -- it was not only introducing a DarkerAndEdgier, older-looking Doctor but also locking down his companion's personality (Clara spent Series 7 Part 2 as more puzzle than consistently characterized person) and running into a RomanticPlotTumor and a too-gloomy story arc in the process. (GrowingTheBeard took place in Series 9.)

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** Series 6 Part 2 of the revival ("Let's Kill Hitler" through "The Wedding of River Song") is considered this by a lot of the fandom. The "Silence Will Fall" story arc was very well-received in Series 5, which introduced the Eleventh Doctor (and gave the Daleks, the most recurring antagonists in the series, a victory in the appropriately-titled episode "Victory of the Daleks") and is still widely thought of as the best series of the Moffat era. But in Series 6 the story arc became more confusing, and the SeasonFinale was regarded as unsatisfying -- in part because it left ''a lot'' of the storyline unexplained. From there, Series 7 tried to move away from the Silence arc, but then introduced the related Great Intelligence/Impossible Girl arc in its second half. The Silence arc was ''finally'' wrapped up in the post-season ChristmasEpisode, but it was an underwhelming end for Eleven.Eleven (even if he was massacering Daleks left and right in the climax). In addition, there is an argument over at SeasonalRot that Series 8, the Twelfth Doctor's first season, continued this dork age -- it was not only introducing a DarkerAndEdgier, older-looking Doctor but also locking down his companion's personality (Clara spent Series 7 Part 2 as more puzzle than consistently characterized person) and running into a RomanticPlotTumor and a too-gloomy story arc in the process. (GrowingTheBeard took place in Series 9.)
19th Jul '17 3:37:17 AM dartblaze
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** The Neo-Saban Johnathan Tzachor seasons are widely considered a new Dork Age. Consisting of ''Series/PowerRangersSamurai'' (and ''Super Samurai'') and ''Series/PowerRangersMegaforce'' (and ''Super Megaforce''), these seasons were loaded with non-existent characters, direct copying of the Sentai without any context or sense, dialogue that was childish even by Power Rangers standards, and a slew of other problems that all came to a head in a massively disappointing Anniversary Season. The season ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'', headed by former PR writer Judd Lynn, attempted to fix many of the issues fans had with the last four years, but still isn't considered a good season by many fans.

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** The Neo-Saban Johnathan Tzachor seasons are widely considered a new Dork Age. Consisting of ''Series/PowerRangersSamurai'' (and ''Super Samurai'') and ''Series/PowerRangersMegaforce'' (and ''Super Megaforce''), these seasons were loaded with non-existent characters, direct copying of the Sentai without any context or sense, dialogue that was childish even by Power Rangers standards, and a slew of other problems that all came to a head in a massively disappointing Anniversary Season. The season ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'', headed by former PR writer Judd Lynn, attempted (with some success) to fix many of the issues fans had with the last four years, but still isn't considered a good season by many fans.years.
10th Jul '17 9:15:52 PM Twentington
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** Bob retired in 2007 and comedian Drew Carey took his place, only to find himself continuing the Dork Age for many. One of the main points of criticism was a set of Showcase skits that employed random "humor" (to his credit, Drew now considers these an OldShame); a moment where a contestant bid on their Showcase to the exact dollar and Drew completely undersold the momentous occasion (although this was because he rightly suggested that the contestant was employing LoopholeAbuse, it still resulted in the prize pool getting a massive overhaul), several celebrity cameos and gimmicky episodes that were met with derision (such as an episode where Jack Wagner proceeded to chew the scenery to bits, and another episode where all six pricing games were Plinko), and a few instances where he screwed up rules on pricing games (to the point that one game was permanently taken out of rotation because of this). Many other crew members were randomly let go after Drew took over, including several producers, the director, and even Rich Fields, who was replaced by George Gray after another bevy of substitutes (although his departure was supposedly due to personal issues unrelated to the show). While some criticism of Drew still lingers, it seems that the show has largely come unto its own again.
* ''Series/LateNight With Conan O'Brien'' got into this after AndyRichter left in 2000.

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** Bob retired in 2007 and comedian Drew Carey took his place, only to find himself continuing the Dork Age for many. One of the main points of criticism was a set of Showcase skits that employed random "humor" (to his credit, Drew now considers these an OldShame); Among other things during Drew's first few years, there were: a moment where a contestant bid on their Showcase to the exact dollar and Drew completely undersold the momentous occasion (although this was because he rightly suggested that the contestant was employing LoopholeAbuse, it still resulted in the prize pool getting a massive overhaul), several pointless celebrity cameos and gimmicky episodes that were met with derision (such as an episode (including one where Jack Wagner proceeded to chew [[ChewingTheScenery chewed the scenery scenery]] so obtrusively that it appeared to bits, and another distract a couple contestants into losing), strange gimmicks (such as an episode where all six pricing games were Plinko), Plinko). There was also criticism over Carey's hosting style in general, such as "comedic" Showcase skits that often demeaned Rich (to be fair, Drew now considers these an OldShame), Drew [[MotorMouth talking way too fast]] and a few having fluctuating enthusiasm, and several instances where he screwed up the rules on pricing games (to (most notoriously, the point that one game Make Your Mark[[note]]originally called Barker's Markers[[/note]] was permanently taken out of rotation because of retired due to this). Many other crew members were randomly let go under mysterious circumstnaces after Drew took over, including several producers, the director, directors, and even Rich Fields, who was replaced by George Gray after another bevy of substitutes (although his departure was supposedly due to personal issues unrelated to the show). While some criticism of Drew still lingers, it seems that the show has largely come unto its own again.
again as of TheNewTens.
* ''Series/LateNight With Conan O'Brien'' got into this after AndyRichter Andy Richter left in 2000.



** The show returned in 1999, at which point the Dork Age reached its peak. A brand-new, modern set was created and the new host was Louie Anderson, a gravel-voiced, overweight comedian who never looked like he wanted to be there. Plus, the game removed the round with double point values, opting for the Single-Single-Single-Triple format with the top scorer playing Fast Money. To make matters worse, teams were allowed only one strike in the Triple Round (meaning clearing the board in that round required a FlawlessVictory) and it became a one-and-done game. The only good thing that came out of this was the doubling of the Fast Money prize to $20,000 in 2001, something Anderson actually advocated. Louie was ousted a year later (something he didn't take well, predicting ''Feud'' would be canceled within the next year, which it wasn't), but his replacement, Richard Karn wasn't that much better. Though the returning champs format was reinstated and a more conventional "play to 300 points" main game replaced the high-scoring/one-strike-in-triple-round/no-double-round in 2003, Karn's NoIndoorVoice, stiff hosting style, and over-reliance on "I'm ''doubling the points''!" catch-phrases became unbearable.
** The Dork Age finally stated signs of slowing after John O'Hurley replaced Karn in 2006 and brought out an updated version of the Dawson/Combs sets, replacing the "modern" set; the next year saw the "party music" composed for the 1999 revival be replaced by a cleaned-up version of the Combs-era remix. Depending on who you ask, it ended completely either when O'Hurley [[GrowingTheBeard got more comfortable hosting]] or when Steve Harvey replaced him, [[WinBackTheCrowd bringing its ratings up]] to a level comparable to that of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' and ''Series/WheelOfFortune''. However, some longtime fans think that Harvey brought the show ''back'' into a Dork Age, as the popularity of his {{Wild Take}}s whenever a contestant gave a lurid answer were being heavily enforced by the writers, causing the questions to become HotterAndSexier as a result.
* The Game Show genre as a whole entered one in the New 10's when shows that followed the lead of ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' with {{Padding}} and whatnot began airing.

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** The show returned in 1999, at which point the Dork Age reached its peak. A brand-new, modern set was created and the new host was Louie Anderson, a gravel-voiced, overweight comedian who never looked like he wanted to be there. Plus, the game removed the round with double point values, opting for the Single-Single-Single-Triple format with the top scorer playing Fast Money.structure was tweaked to have three single-point rounds [[GoldenSnitch and a triple-point round]]. To make matters worse, teams were allowed only one strike in the Triple Round (meaning clearing the board in that round required a FlawlessVictory) and it became a one-and-done game. The only good thing that came out of this was the doubling of the Fast Money prize to $20,000 in 2001, something Anderson actually advocated. Louie was ousted a year later (something he didn't take well, predicting ''Feud'' would be canceled within the next year, which it wasn't), year), but his replacement, Richard Karn wasn't that much better. Though the returning champs format was reinstated reinstated, the set was remodeled, a remix of the Combs-era theme replaced the "party" theme, and a more conventional "play to 300 points" main game replaced the high-scoring/one-strike-in-triple-round/no-double-round broken "one strike" format in 2003, Karn's NoIndoorVoice, stiff hosting style, and over-reliance on "I'm ''doubling the points''!" catch-phrases became unbearable.
** The Dork Age finally stated signs of slowing after John O'Hurley replaced Karn in 2006 and brought out an updated version of 2006, due to O'Hurley having experience as a host on the Dawson/Combs sets, replacing the "modern" set; the next year saw the "party music" composed for the 1999 2000-2002 revival be replaced by a cleaned-up version of the Combs-era remix.''Series/ToTellTheTruth''. Depending on who you ask, it ended completely either when O'Hurley [[GrowingTheBeard got more comfortable hosting]] or when Steve Harvey replaced him, [[WinBackTheCrowd bringing its ratings up]] to a level comparable to that of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' and ''Series/WheelOfFortune''. However, some longtime fans think that Harvey brought the show ''back'' into a Dork Age, as the popularity of his {{Wild Take}}s whenever a contestant gave a lurid answer were being heavily enforced by the writers, causing the questions to become HotterAndSexier as a result.
* The Game Show game show genre as a whole entered one in a few:
** In 1990,
the New 10's market was flooded with a vast array of game shows, mostly revivals, and mostly mediocre. The flooding of the networks was so severe that it killed the concept of a daytime game show for many years, leaving ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' as the last man standing on daytime network television until 2008. Any successes at this point were largely in nighttime syndication.
** At the TurnOfTheMillennium, the "big money" game show craze took off, thanks to the unbridled popularity of ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire''. The show was so popular that [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire many other producers]] were quick to copy its tropes (dramatic lighting, bare-bones quiz format, ridiculously huge cash jackpots). ''Millionaire'' itself underwent massive WolverinePublicity which, combined with the deluge of copycats, sent the genre into a tailspin. ''Millionaire'' quickly went from a national phenomenon to a quietly-performing shadow of itself in syndication, and overinflated jackpots quickly fell by the wayside.
** The genre went through another around 2008
when shows that followed the lead of ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' with {{Padding}} and whatnot began airing. As with ''Millionaire'', copycats abounded and the original's format wore thin. There were also a myriad of terrible, poorly-planned shows in syndication, such as ''Series/{{Temptation|2007}}'' and ''Series/MervGriffinsCrosswords''; the fallout was so severe that Creator/{{GSN}} started airing televised poker and reality shows in an attempt to catch up with those then-hot markets. The game show field seems to have finally reversed as of 2016-17, thanks to a popular block on Creator/{{ABC}} consisting of revamped versions of ''Series/ToTellTheTruth'', ''[[Series/{{Pyramid}} The $100,000 Pyramid]]'' and ''Series/MatchGame'', plus a celebrity version of ''Series/FamilyFeud''. Also, a revival of ''Series/TheGongShow'' joined the fray in summer 2017.
10th Jul '17 12:06:47 AM Twentington
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* ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started to get a little tired in Bob Barker's last few seasons: increasing senior moments from Bob, sudden insurgence of idiotic contestants, a butt-ugly set (it was recolored in a pink and blue motif for Bob's last seasons), declining health of announcer Rod Roddy, backstage drama that led to many models being fired and Rod no longer appearing on-camera, followed by Rod's death in 2003. Bob's successor Drew Carey brought on a few first-time jitters that some consider an extension of the Dork Age. A notable example is the notorious "Drewcases" in 2008 and 2009, most of which were seen as unfunny, plus humiliating to announcer Rich Fields to Drew's credit, he later admitted they were a bad idea.

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* ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' had two instances which are somewhat connected:
** It
started to get a little tired in Bob Barker's last few seasons: increasing senior moments from Bob, sudden insurgence of idiotic contestants, a butt-ugly set (it was recolored in a pink and blue motif for Bob's last seasons), declining health of announcer Rod Roddy, backstage drama that led to many models being fired and announcer Rod Roddy no longer appearing on-camera, followed by on-camera (which Fremantle notoriously tried to cover up). Rod's death faltering health led to long stretches of guest announcers, culminating in 2003. Bob's successor a rotation of mostly forgettable to awful substitutes (the nadir being Daniel Rosen) after his 2003 death. Rod's replacement, Rich Fields, was also seen as a BrokenBase.
** Bob retired in 2007 and comedian
Drew Carey brought on a few first-time jitters that some consider an extension of took his place, only to find himself continuing the Dork Age. A notable example is Age for many. One of the notorious "Drewcases" in 2008 and 2009, most main points of which were seen as unfunny, plus humiliating to announcer Rich Fields to Drew's criticism was a set of Showcase skits that employed random "humor" (to his credit, Drew now considers these an OldShame); a moment where a contestant bid on their Showcase to the exact dollar and Drew completely undersold the momentous occasion (although this was because he later admitted they rightly suggested that the contestant was employing LoopholeAbuse, it still resulted in the prize pool getting a massive overhaul), several celebrity cameos and gimmicky episodes that were met with derision (such as an episode where Jack Wagner proceeded to chew the scenery to bits, and another episode where all six pricing games were Plinko), and a bad idea.few instances where he screwed up rules on pricing games (to the point that one game was permanently taken out of rotation because of this). Many other crew members were randomly let go after Drew took over, including several producers, the director, and even Rich Fields, who was replaced by George Gray after another bevy of substitutes (although his departure was supposedly due to personal issues unrelated to the show). While some criticism of Drew still lingers, it seems that the show has largely come unto its own again.
8th Jun '17 7:14:49 AM jormis29
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** Season 11 (1985-6): The first season after Lorne's return, the entire cast was replaced again, this time with a new cast that included such famous or soon-to-be-famous names as Creator/RobertDowneyJr, Anthony Michael Hall, Randy Quaid, Joan Cusack, and Damon Wayans. However, such an eclectic group didn't work well together, and the show once again faced critical bashing and danger of cancellation. Jon Lovitz, Creator/DennisMiller, Nora Dunn, and A. Whitney Brown were the only cast members kept for next season, where a group of new cast members led by Creator/DanaCarvey and Creator/PhilHartman saved the show.

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** Season 11 (1985-6): The first season after Lorne's return, the entire cast was replaced again, this time with a new cast that included such famous or soon-to-be-famous names as Creator/RobertDowneyJr, Anthony Michael Hall, Randy Quaid, Joan Cusack, and Damon Wayans. However, such an eclectic group didn't work well together, and the show once again faced critical bashing and danger of cancellation. Jon Lovitz, Creator/JonLovitz, Creator/DennisMiller, Nora Dunn, and A. Whitney Brown were the only cast members kept for next season, where a group of new cast members led by Creator/DanaCarvey and Creator/PhilHartman saved the show.
6th Jun '17 4:29:33 PM jm9101983
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* Because of its [[LongRunners very long tenure]] (late 1980s until late 1990s), it was inevitable that the ABC network's two-hour (8:00-10:00 p.m.) "TGIF" (short for "Thank Goodness It's Friday") sitcom lineup would hit a few speed bumps. The decline began in the 1991-1992 season, when two mainstays of the lineup since the beginning changed timeslots. ''Series/FullHouse'' moved to Tuesdays and stayed there for the remainder of its run, while ''Series/PerfectStrangers'' moved to Saturdays in midseason to anchor a failed comedy block intended to capitalize off of TGIF's success. The latter show returned to Fridays for its abbreviated (six-episode) final season the following year. Said circumstances left ''Series/FamilyMatters'' as the block's flagship program. Numerous new shows were test-run, a few of which (''Series/StepByStep'' and ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'' most notably) became huge favorites but most of which were gone within a year or so. Even ''Family Matters'' itself began to suffer, as [[ExtravertedNerd Steve Urkel]] went from being the sitcom's BreakoutCharacter to being practically the sole reason for the show's existence, with plots tailored around his various "wacky" inventions. And then ToiletHumour started creeping in, and then ethnic humor... and it was all downhill from there. By the mid-'90s, TGIF was little more than a random generator of broad farces, often with ridiculous fantasy themes (''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'', ''Series/TeenAngel''...), that would have been more appropriate for the '60s than the '90s. A "crossover" arc late in the lineup's run only served to demonstrate how blandly interchangeable the shows had become.

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* Because of its [[LongRunners very long tenure]] (late 1980s until late 1990s), it was inevitable that the ABC network's two-hour (8:00-10:00 p.m.) "TGIF" (short for "Thank Goodness It's Friday") sitcom lineup would hit a few speed bumps. The decline began in the 1991-1992 season, when two mainstays of the lineup since the beginning changed timeslots. ''Series/FullHouse'' moved to Tuesdays and stayed there for the remainder of its run, while ''Series/PerfectStrangers'' moved to Saturdays in midseason to anchor a failed comedy block intended to capitalize off of TGIF's success. The latter show returned to Fridays for its abbreviated (six-episode) final season the following year. Said circumstances left ''Series/FamilyMatters'' as the block's flagship program. Numerous new shows were test-run, a few of which (''Series/StepByStep'' and ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'' most notably) became huge favorites but most of which were gone within a year or so. Even ''Family Matters'' itself began to suffer, as [[ExtravertedNerd Steve Urkel]] went from being the sitcom's BreakoutCharacter to being practically the sole reason for the show's existence, with plots tailored around his various "wacky" inventions. And then ToiletHumour started creeping in, and then ethnic humor... and it was all downhill from there. By the mid-'90s, 1996, TGIF was little more than a random generator of broad farces, often with ridiculous fantasy themes (''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'', ''Series/TeenAngel''...), that would have been more appropriate for the '60s than the '90s. A "crossover" arc late in the lineup's run only served to demonstrate how blandly interchangeable the shows had become.
6th Jun '17 4:25:01 PM jm9101983
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** Season 20 (1994-95) The first year after Hartman left (and two years after Carvey left), the cast was now led by the likes of Creator/AdamSandler, Creator/ChrisFarley, and David Spade, who weren't versatile enough to lead the show. Sketches often had very thin premises, many centering around the O.J. Simpson trial, and levels of sophomoric humor reached critical mass, resulting in lambasting by critics. Also, reports of behind-the-scenes turmoil, much of it involving Creator/JaneaneGarofalo (who joined the cast that year but left in disgust midway through), led to the perception of a general decay of the show. More than half the cast was replaced after the season, and a new group led by Creator/WillFerrell helped create another resurgence.

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** Season 20 (1994-95) The first year season after Hartman left (and two years seasons after Carvey left), the cast was now led by the likes of Creator/AdamSandler, Creator/ChrisFarley, and David Spade, who weren't versatile enough to lead the show. Sketches often had very thin premises, many centering around the O.J. Simpson trial, and levels of sophomoric humor reached critical mass, resulting in lambasting by critics. Also, reports of behind-the-scenes turmoil, much of it involving Creator/JaneaneGarofalo (who joined the cast that year but left in disgust midway through), led to the perception of a general decay of the show. More than half the cast was replaced after the season, and a new group led by Creator/WillFerrell helped create another resurgence.
6th Jun '17 4:15:09 PM jm9101983
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* ''Series/SesameStreet'' faced a problem in the '90s - the surging popularity of ''Series/BarneyAndFriends''. Their attempt to restore their own market share was the "Around the Corner" project, which added a gentrified cul-de-sac to the street, populated by characters born in marketing meetings. ''Nobody'' working on the show liked it, particularly since the show's tradition of untrained children was jettisoned in favor of professional child actors (because that's how it worked on ''Barney''). This period of the show's history (which resulted in ''one'' lasting change - Zoe - and even she took a long time to catch on) is generally skipped over in discussions.

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* ''Series/SesameStreet'' faced a problem in the '90s 1993 - the surging popularity of ''Series/BarneyAndFriends''. Their attempt to restore their own market share was the "Around the Corner" project, which added a gentrified cul-de-sac to the street, populated by characters born in marketing meetings. ''Nobody'' working on the show liked it, particularly since the show's tradition of untrained children was jettisoned in favor of professional child actors (because that's how it worked on ''Barney''). This period of the show's history (which resulted in ''one'' lasting change - Zoe - and even she took a long time to catch on) is generally skipped over in discussions.
27th May '17 3:13:49 PM AlternativeCola
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* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' had a Dork Age comprising of [[SeasonalRot seasons three and four]], in which Marc Guggenheim and Wendy Mericle took over as showrunners from Andrew Kreisberg. This includes [[spoiler:Sara being StuffedIntoTheFridge]] in the season three premier ([[spoiler:later BackFromTheDead and became one of the main characters for spin-off ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'']]) and allowing [[spoiler:Laurel to become Black Canary (though she managed to get RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap)]], the RomanticPlotTumor involving Oliver and Felicity (which resulted in Felicity becoming from EnsembleDarkhorse to BaseBreakingCharacter then to [[TheScrappy Scrappy]]), the overuse of flashbacks, Roy being PutOnABus, mediocre plots and most controversially, [[spoiler:Laurel KilledOffForReal]] in season four. Despite this, the CrossoverEpisode with ''Series/{{Constantine}}'' was considered to be one of the best things from it and the Dork Age ended with the well-received season 5, which served as a RevisitingTheRoots season and concluded the five-year flashback subplot.

to:

* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' had a Dork Age comprising of [[SeasonalRot seasons three and four]], in which Marc Guggenheim and Wendy Mericle took over as showrunners from Andrew Kreisberg. This includes [[spoiler:Sara being StuffedIntoTheFridge]] in the season three premier ([[spoiler:later BackFromTheDead and became one of the main characters for spin-off ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'']]) and allowing [[spoiler:Laurel to become Black Canary (though she managed to get RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap)]], the RomanticPlotTumor involving Oliver and Felicity (which resulted in Felicity becoming from EnsembleDarkhorse to BaseBreakingCharacter then to [[TheScrappy Scrappy]]), the overuse of flashbacks, Roy being PutOnABus, mediocre plots and most controversially, [[spoiler:Laurel KilledOffForReal]] in season four. Despite this, the CrossoverEpisode {{Crossover}} with ''Series/{{Constantine}}'' was considered to be one of the best things from it and the Dork Age ended with the well-received season 5, which served as a RevisitingTheRoots season and concluded the five-year flashback subplot.
27th May '17 3:12:29 PM AlternativeCola
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' had a Dork Age comprising of [[SeasonalRot seasons three and four]], in which Marc Guggenheim and Wendy Mericle took over as showrunners from Andrew Kreisberg. This includes [[spoiler:Sara being StuffedIntoTheFridge]] in the season three premier ([[spoiler:later BackFromTheDead and became one of the main characters for spin-off ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'']]) and allowing [[spoiler:Laurel to become Black Canary (though she managed to get RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap)]], the RomanticPlotTumor involving Oliver and Felicity (which resulted in Felicity becoming from EnsembleDarkhorse to BaseBreakingCharacter then to [[TheScrappy Scrappy]]), the overuse of flashbacks, Roy being PutOnABus, mediocre plots and most controversially, [[spoiler:Laurel KilledOffForReal]] in season four. Despite this, the CrossoverEpisode with ''Series/{{Constantine}}'' was considered to be one of the best things from it and the Dork Age ended with the well-received season 5, which served as a RevisitingTheRoots season and concluded the five-year flashback subplot.
This list shows the last 10 events of 162. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DorkAge.LiveActionTV