History DorkAge / LiveActionTV

14th Jan '18 11:17:13 AM nombretomado
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* Executive producer Creator/StevenBochco and consultant Creator/DavidEKelley left ''LALaw'' after its sixth season was over; Bochco was replaced by John Masius and John Tinker. Consequently, the seventh season suffered a noticeable decline in quality (and ratings); silly, soapy plots dominated the season's first half, culminating in what many fans feel was the worst hour ever of ''L.A. Law,'' "Odor in the Court." Midseason, Masius and Tinker were let go and William Finkelstein was brought in to attempt to repair the damage. He mostly succeeded; the series was beginning to [[GrowingTheBeard grow its beard back]] by the eighth season, but it was too late to save the series from cancellation.

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* Executive producer Creator/StevenBochco and consultant Creator/DavidEKelley left ''LALaw'' ''Series/LALaw'' after its sixth season was over; Bochco was replaced by John Masius and John Tinker. Consequently, the seventh season suffered a noticeable decline in quality (and ratings); silly, soapy plots dominated the season's first half, culminating in what many fans feel was the worst hour ever of ''L.A. Law,'' "Odor in the Court." Midseason, Masius and Tinker were let go and William Finkelstein was brought in to attempt to repair the damage. He mostly succeeded; the series was beginning to [[GrowingTheBeard grow its beard back]] by the eighth season, but it was too late to save the series from cancellation.
12th Jan '18 9:28:17 PM caffeinedelusions
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** A large portion of the fanbase considers everything done in the Star Trek franchise after Enterprise went off the air to be a lengthy Dork Age that they loudly clamor for the franchise to emerge from.
15th Dec '17 9:23:32 AM Anddrix
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** Series 8-10, the Twelfth Doctor era, is often the subject of debates as to whether it falls under this trope or not. While Creator/PeterCapaldi's performance is generally acclaimed, this run is often criticized for his Doctor's more off-putting, grouchy nature, his Series 8-9 companion Clara Oswald (already a divisive character from the aforementioned Series 7B) [[CreatorsPet receiving the lion's share of the attention]], and a lot of LoveItOrHateIt stories and concepts. A common theory from the detractors is that Steven Moffat stayed in the role of showrunner a bit too long, to the detriment of the writing. On the other side of the aisle are those who feel that Twelve's era had richer characterization and plotting, plus less convoluted/more satisfying {{Story Arc}}s, than Eleven's seasons in particular. A ''major'' factor in which side a viewer falls on is whether said fan is familiar with the ''original'' series and not just the revival -- those who are familiar with old-school ''Who'' seem more likely to appreciate the Capaldi era as a more direct continuation of the "classical" Doctors' eras than the previous revival seasons were.

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** Series 8-10, the Twelfth Doctor era, is often the subject of debates as to whether it falls under this trope or not. While Creator/PeterCapaldi's performance is generally acclaimed, this run is often criticized for his Doctor's more off-putting, grouchy nature, his Series 8-9 companion Clara Oswald (already a divisive character from the aforementioned Series 7B) [[CreatorsPet receiving the lion's share of the attention]], and a lot of LoveItOrHateIt polarizing stories and concepts. A common theory from the detractors is that Steven Moffat stayed in the role of showrunner a bit too long, to the detriment of the writing. On the other side of the aisle are those who feel that Twelve's era had richer characterization and plotting, plus less convoluted/more satisfying {{Story Arc}}s, than Eleven's seasons in particular. A ''major'' factor in which side a viewer falls on is whether said fan is familiar with the ''original'' series and not just the revival -- those who are familiar with old-school ''Who'' seem more likely to appreciate the Capaldi era as a more direct continuation of the "classical" Doctors' eras than the previous revival seasons were.
12th Dec '17 10:48:51 PM Twentington
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*** 1988: Pat Sajak stepped down from the daytime version to host his self-titled talk show (he's stayed with the nighttime version) and was replaced by Rolf Benirschke, a former football player who had no TV experience and was clearly uncomfortable in the role, to the point that he once admitted he ''didn't know what to do'' on-air. (This was also the point when M.G. Kelly took over for the late Jack Clark as both versions' announcer; fans hated him for his overly mellow delivery, while Pat Sajak later noted that he constantly had to re-take prize copy because he kept tripping over his words. Kelly left the show in 1989 when original announcer Charlie O'Donnell came back.) Rolf lasted only six months before the network version {{Channel Hop}}ped to CBS, with the much better-received host Bob Goen, who stayed with it until daytime game shows became DeaderThanDisco.

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*** 1988: Pat Sajak stepped down from the daytime version to host his self-titled talk show (he's stayed with the nighttime version) and was replaced by Rolf Benirschke, a former football player who had no TV experience and was clearly uncomfortable in the role, to the point that he once admitted he ''didn't know what to do'' on-air. (This was also the point when M.G. Kelly took over for the late Jack Clark as both versions' announcer; fans hated him for his overly mellow delivery, while Pat Sajak later noted that he constantly had to re-take prize copy because he kept tripping over his words. Kelly left the show in 1989 when original announcer Charlie O'Donnell came back.) Rolf lasted only six months before the network version {{Channel Hop}}ped to CBS, with the much better-received host Bob Goen, who stayed with it until the above-mentioned decline of daytime game shows became DeaderThanDisco.shows.



*** 1994-95: The notorious "Megaword" category, which even Sajak himself hated, and which many fans and contestants hated for being needlessly difficult (the category was a long word that a contestant could then use in a sentence for a bonus); a seemingly endless barrage of similarly difficult puzzles that led to long stretches of wrong letters (not just in Megaword, where one well-known round took '''''13''''' turns before anyone uncovered a letter in OXIDIZED, but also in several other similarly obscure puzzles)

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*** 1994-95: The notorious "Megaword" category, which even Sajak himself hated, and which many fans and contestants hated for being needlessly difficult (the category was a long word that a contestant could then use in a sentence for a bonus); a seemingly endless barrage of similarly difficult puzzles that led to long stretches of wrong letters (not just in Megaword, where one well-known round took '''''13''''' turns before anyone uncovered a letter in OXIDIZED, but also in several other similarly obscure puzzles)puzzles). Despite its short life, Megaword is still regarded to this day as one of the worst ideas in the show's history.
12th Dec '17 10:45:12 PM Twentington
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** Bob retired in 2007 and Drew Carey took his place, only to find himself continuing the Dork Age for many. Among other things during Drew's first few years, there were: a moment where a contestant bid on their Showcase to the exact dollar and Drew completely undersold the momentous occasion (although this was because he rightly suspected that the contestant was employing LoopholeAbuse, it still resulted in the prize pool getting a massive overhaul), pointless celebrity cameos (including one where Jack Wagner [[ChewingTheScenery chewed the scenery]] so obtrusively that it appeared to distract a couple contestants into losing), and strange gimmicks (such as an episode where all six pricing games were Plinko). There was also criticism over Carey's hosting style in general, such as "comedic" Showcase skits that often demeaned Rich (to be fair, Drew now considers these an OldShame), Drew [[MotorMouth talking way too fast]] and having fluctuating enthusiasm, and several instances where he screwed up the rules (most notoriously, the game Make Your Mark[[note]]originally called Barker's Markers[[/note]] was retired due to this). Many other crew members were randomly let go under mysterious circumstnaces after Drew took over, including producers, directors, and even Rich Fields, who was replaced by George Gray after another bevy of substitutes (although his departure was supposedly due to personal issues unrelated to the show). While some criticism of Drew still lingers, it seems that the show has largely come unto its own again as of TheNewTens.

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** Bob retired in 2007 and Drew Carey took his place, only to find himself continuing the Dork Age for many. Among other things during Drew's first few years, there were: a moment where a contestant bid on their Showcase to the exact dollar and Drew completely undersold the momentous occasion (although this was because he rightly suspected that the contestant was employing LoopholeAbuse, it still resulted in the prize pool getting a massive overhaul), pointless celebrity cameos (including one where Jack Wagner [[ChewingTheScenery chewed the scenery]] so obtrusively that it appeared to distract a couple contestants into losing), and strange gimmicks (such as an episode where all six pricing games were Plinko). There was also criticism over Carey's hosting style in general, such as "comedic" Showcase skits that often demeaned Rich (to be fair, Drew now considers these an OldShame), Drew [[MotorMouth talking way too fast]] and having fluctuating enthusiasm, and several instances where he screwed up the rules (most notoriously, the game Make Your Mark[[note]]originally called Barker's Markers[[/note]] was retired due to this). Many other crew members were randomly let go under mysterious circumstnaces circumstances after Drew took over, including producers, directors, and even Rich Fields, who was replaced by George Gray after another bevy of substitutes (although his departure was supposedly due to personal issues unrelated to the show). While some criticism of Drew still lingers, it seems that the show has largely come unto emerged from its own again dork age as of TheNewTens.
6th Dec '17 1:03:13 PM jayharrison
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* ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', ''Wheel''[='=]s sister show, has also fallen into its own Dork Age:
** At the start of ''Jeopardy!''[='=]s 1997-98 season, the producers began videotaping celebrities, public figures (scientists, politicians, etc.), journalists, and prolific writers to deliver individual clues and, in less frequent cases, full categories. Not only do their clues tend to break the show's pacing, often taking up to 20 seconds to deliver, their utilization has become much more common in recent years--even going so far and so low as to feature soap opera actors awkwardly delivering clues ''in character''.
** However, it's more strongly arguable that ''Jeopardy!'' went full steam ahead into Dork Age territory with [[CreatorsPet the Clue Crew]], a regular "feature" born in 2001. It's bad enough that the clues presented by these [[YoungerAndHipper young assistants]] tend to eat up as much time as their celebrity counterparts. It gets even worse upon realizing that, if any member of the Clue Crew introduces a category, there's hardly any effort to speed the game up until ''after'' the crew's entire column has been cleared out.
13th Oct '17 12:59:33 AM EricW
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* ''Franchise/PowerRangers''

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* ''Franchise/PowerRangers''''Franchise/PowerRangers'' has had a few dork ages, although some of them are seen a bit kinder with time passing.


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** The "Kallish Era" at Disney is considered a dorky time for the franchise, with an overuse of oversized explosions, over reliance on non ranger powers, problematic characterization of rangers in certain seasons, and issues in writing quality compared with what came before. ''Series/PowerRangersSPD'' was already divisive enough, but it was the next 2 (''PowerRangersMysticForce'' and ''PowerRangersOperationOverdrive'') that really exasperated the problems in this era. So much so that the followup ''PowerRangersJungleFury'' was largely forgotten, though that series now gets a consistent stamp of "Underrrated" these days. It took the franchise nearly being cancelled to jolt them out of it with the very different ''PowerRangersRPM'', but unfortunately, this was not the end of the bad times for Power Rangers.
19th Sep '17 9:57:53 AM JamesAustin
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* ''Series/TheDailyShow'' is usually held to have fallen into one after Creator/JonStewart left in 2015. His replacement Trevor Noah caused a BrokenBase among fans, and more importantly, most of the supporting talent (Creator/StephenColbert, Creator/JohnOliver, Samantha Bee, Larry Wilmore) followed Stewart and [[BreakupBreakout launched their own shows]], some of which (most notably Oliver's ''Series/{{Last Week Tonight|With John Oliver}}'' and Bee's ''Series/{{Full Frontal|WithSamanthaBee}}'') are considered to be [[SpiritualSuccessor the true heirs]] to the Stewart-era ''Daily Show'' by fans.

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* ''Series/TheDailyShow'' is usually held to have fallen into one after Creator/JonStewart left in 2015. His replacement Trevor Noah caused a BrokenBase among fans, and more importantly, most of the supporting talent (Creator/StephenColbert, Creator/JohnOliver, Samantha Bee, Larry Wilmore) Creator/SamanthaBee, Creator/LarryWilmore) followed Stewart and [[BreakupBreakout launched their own shows]], some of which (most notably Oliver's ''Series/{{Last Week Tonight|With John Oliver}}'' Tonight|WithJohnOliver}}'' and Bee's ''Series/{{Full Frontal|WithSamanthaBee}}'') are considered to be [[SpiritualSuccessor the true heirs]] to the Stewart-era ''Daily Show'' by fans.
9th Sep '17 11:04:31 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ''Series/TheDailyShow'' is usually held to have fallen into one after Creator/JonStewart left in 2015. His replacement Trevor Noah caused a BrokenBase among fans, and more importantly, most of the supporting talent (Creator/StephenColbert, Creator/JohnOliver, Samantha Bee, Larry Wilmore) followed Stewart and [[BreakupBreakout launched their own shows]], some of which (most notably Oliver's ''Series/{{Last Week Tonight|With John Oliver}}'' and Bee's ''Full Frontal'') are considered to be [[SpiritualSuccessor the true heirs]] to the Stewart-era ''Daily Show'' by fans.

to:

* ''Series/TheDailyShow'' is usually held to have fallen into one after Creator/JonStewart left in 2015. His replacement Trevor Noah caused a BrokenBase among fans, and more importantly, most of the supporting talent (Creator/StephenColbert, Creator/JohnOliver, Samantha Bee, Larry Wilmore) followed Stewart and [[BreakupBreakout launched their own shows]], some of which (most notably Oliver's ''Series/{{Last Week Tonight|With John Oliver}}'' and Bee's ''Full Frontal'') ''Series/{{Full Frontal|WithSamanthaBee}}'') are considered to be [[SpiritualSuccessor the true heirs]] to the Stewart-era ''Daily Show'' by fans.
8th Sep '17 11:21:11 AM Sapphirea2
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** Series 6 Part 2 of the revival ("Let's Kill Hitler" through "The Wedding of River Song") is considered this by a lot of the fandom. The "Silence Will Fall" story arc was very well-received in Series 5, which introduced the Eleventh Doctor (and gave the Daleks, the most recurring antagonists in the series, a victory in the appropriately-titled episode "Victory of the Daleks") and is still widely thought of as the best series of the Moffat era. But in Series 6 the story arc became more confusing, and the SeasonFinale was regarded as unsatisfying -- in part because it left ''a lot'' of the storyline unexplained. From there, Series 7 tried to move away from the Silence arc, but then introduced the related Great Intelligence/Impossible Girl arc in its second half. The Silence arc was ''finally'' wrapped up in the post-season ChristmasEpisode, but it was an underwhelming end for Eleven (even if he was massacering Daleks left and right in the climax). In addition, there is an argument over at SeasonalRot that Series 8, the Twelfth Doctor's first season, continued this dork age -- it was not only introducing a DarkerAndEdgier, older-looking Doctor but also locking down his companion's personality (Clara spent Series 7 Part 2 as more puzzle than consistently characterized person) and running into a RomanticPlotTumor and a too-gloomy story arc in the process. (GrowingTheBeard took place in Series 9.)

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** Series 6 Part 2 of the revival ("Let's Kill Hitler" through "The Wedding of River Song") is considered this by a lot of the fandom. The "Silence Will Fall" story arc was very well-received in Series 5, which introduced the Eleventh Doctor (and gave the Daleks, the most recurring antagonists in the series, a victory in the appropriately-titled episode "Victory of the Daleks") and is still widely thought of as the best series of the Moffat era. But in Series 6 the story arc became more confusing, and the SeasonFinale was regarded as unsatisfying -- in part because it left ''a lot'' of the storyline unexplained. From there, Series 7 tried to move away from the Silence arc, but then introduced the related but even ''less'' popular Great Intelligence/Impossible Girl arc in its second half. The Silence arc was ''finally'' wrapped up in the post-season ChristmasEpisode, but it was an underwhelming end for Eleven (even if he was massacering Daleks left and right in the climax). In addition, there is an argument over at SeasonalRot that About the only stretch of Series 8, 6B-7 most fans agree is excellent is the 50th anniversary special "The Day of the Doctor", and its very success played into Eleven's GrandFinale -- the next story to air -- getting a head-shaking reception.
** Series 8-10,
the Twelfth Doctor era, is often the subject of debates as to whether it falls under this trope or not. While Creator/PeterCapaldi's performance is generally acclaimed, this run is often criticized for his Doctor's first season, continued this dork age -- it was not only introducing a DarkerAndEdgier, older-looking Doctor but also locking down more off-putting, grouchy nature, his companion's personality (Clara spent Series 7 Part 2 as more puzzle than consistently characterized person) and running into 8-9 companion Clara Oswald (already a RomanticPlotTumor divisive character from the aforementioned Series 7B) [[CreatorsPet receiving the lion's share of the attention]], and a too-gloomy story arc lot of LoveItOrHateIt stories and concepts. A common theory from the detractors is that Steven Moffat stayed in the process. (GrowingTheBeard took place role of showrunner a bit too long, to the detriment of the writing. On the other side of the aisle are those who feel that Twelve's era had richer characterization and plotting, plus less convoluted/more satisfying {{Story Arc}}s, than Eleven's seasons in Series 9.)particular. A ''major'' factor in which side a viewer falls on is whether said fan is familiar with the ''original'' series and not just the revival -- those who are familiar with old-school ''Who'' seem more likely to appreciate the Capaldi era as a more direct continuation of the "classical" Doctors' eras than the previous revival seasons were.



** While Peter Capaldi's performance is generally acclaimed, there is a common argument that his era falls here. There is much to debate about this (he has his champions as well), but reasons cited generally include his Doctor's more off-putting, grouchy and hard-to-like nature, his companion Clara (herself a divisive character) [[CreatorsPet receiving the lion's share of the attention]], a lot of rather love-them-or-hate-them stories and the argument that Steven Moffat has stayed in the role of showrunner a bit too long to the detriment of the writing.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DorkAge.LiveActionTV