History Creator / WilliamSBurroughs

22nd Apr '15 5:25:52 AM Patachou
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* Music/JohnZorn's "Interzone" (2010) and "Dreamachines" (2013) pay tribute to Creator/WilliamSBurroughs and Creator/BrionGysin. "Nova Express" (2011) is also inspired by Burroughs' prose.
19th Apr '15 12:39:44 AM maxwellsilver
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* The album "Stoned Immaculate" (2000) has a track where Burroughs reads poetry by Music/TheDoors frontman Jim Morrison, accompanied by the singer yelping and groaning in the background. Both Morrison and Burroughs were dead by the time this album was released.

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* The album "Stoned Immaculate" (2000) has a track where Burroughs reads poetry by Music/TheDoors frontman Jim Morrison, accompanied by the singer yelping and groaning in the background. Both Morrison and Burroughs were dead by the time this album was released. released.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'' reveals Woodhouse was the one who shot Burroughs' wife in Mexico while high on heroin. Malory mentions she paid 100,000 pesos in bribes and contracted some kind of stomach virus to extract Woodhouse.
16th Apr '15 3:28:19 PM Patachou
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* Music/PattiSmith dedicated her album ''Music/{{Wave}}'' (1979) to him in the liner notes.
18th Mar '15 5:25:22 AM Patachou
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* Music/IggyPop's ''Music/LustForLife'' is inspired by novels

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* Music/IggyPop's ''Music/LustForLife'' is inspired by novelsthe experimental novel "The Ticket That Exploded", most notably by mentions of “Johnny Yen” (described by Burroughs as “The Boy-Girl Other Half strip tease God of sexual frustration”) and “hypnotizing chickens”.
18th Mar '15 5:23:41 AM Patachou
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* ''Last Words'': a collection of diary entries from the final few years of Burroughs' life.

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* ''Last Words'': a collection of diary entries from the final few years of Burroughs' life.life.

'''William S. Burroughs in popular culture'''
* He can be seen on the album cover of Music/TheBeatles' ''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand''.
* The band Music/SteelyDan was named after a dildo in ''Literature/NakedLunch''.
* Music/SoftMachine took its name from Burroughs' novel "Soft Machine".
* The term HeavyMetal first appeared in "Soft Machine", where a character is described as "Uranian Willy, the Heavy Metal Kid". In "Nova Express" the word "heavy metal" is used as a metaphor for addictive drugs.
* The title of ''Film/BladeRunner'' was inspired by a 1979 story by him.
* Music/IggyPop's ''Music/LustForLife'' is inspired by novels
* He has a cameo in Creator/GusVanSant's ''Film/DrugstoreCowboy'' and ''Film/EvenCowgirlsGetTheBlues''.
* Music/SonicYouth, Music/JohnCale, and others provided musical back-up to Burroughs' 1990 SpokenWordInMusic album "Dead City Radio".
* ''Music/TheBlackRider'' by Music/TomWaits was written in collaboration with Burroughs, who also has a spoken word track on the album: "It Ain't No Sin".
* He appears in the music video of "Last Night On Earth" by Music/{{U2}}.
* He recites the spoken word piece "Sharkey's Night" on Music/LaurieAnderson's "Mister Heartbreak" (1984).
* On "Seven Souls (1989)" by Music/BillLaswell's band Material he recites passages from his novel "The Western Lands".
* "Quick Fix" (1992) was a collaboration with Music/{{Ministry}}.
* Music/KurtCobain created layers of guitar feedback and distortion to accompany ""The Priest" They Called Him", where Burroughs reads his own eponymous short story on record. The author also introduced Cobain to Music/{{Leadbelly}}, which inspired Cobain to sing "Where Did You Sleep Last Night", a cover of Leadbelly's "In The Pines", on ''Music/MTVUnpluggedInNewYork''.
* The album "Stoned Immaculate" (2000) has a track where Burroughs reads poetry by Music/TheDoors frontman Jim Morrison, accompanied by the singer yelping and groaning in the background. Both Morrison and Burroughs were dead by the time this album was released.
----
22nd Feb '15 12:53:38 PM Patachou
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* ''The Yage Letters'': a hodgepodge of Burroughs routines and letters to and from his onetime boyfriend AllenGinsberg regarding the search for a plant with psychedelic properties.

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* ''The Yage Letters'': a hodgepodge of Burroughs routines and letters to and from his onetime boyfriend AllenGinsberg Creator/AllenGinsberg regarding the search for a plant with psychedelic properties.
7th Feb '15 4:56:47 PM karstovich2
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Despite his personal troubles and the controversy surrounding his work, Burroughs became highly influential and respected by a wide variety of younger artists, most notably, the more famous beat writers Jack Kerouac and Creator/AllenGinsberg. After experimenting with the cut-up technique, he almost pioneered the graphic novel form (Creator/AlanMoore openly cites Burroughs as a prominent inspiration), but couldn't get the funds, because of the expenses of color copying. His works have also served as an important influence on CyberPunk and NewWaveScienceFiction (the ''Nova Trilogy'', as science fiction itself, is considered a sort of prototype of the New Wave). The actual {{punk}} scene owes a great deal to Burroughs, as well, with his return to America in 1974 being feted by a large number of punks and related artists (including Music/PattiSmith); Music/IggyPop was such a big fan ("Lust for Life" is merely his most obvious example of Burroughs fandom) that when the BBC did a radio biography of Burroughs, he was chosen to present it. And of course, there's his literary heir, HunterSThompson, who was basically Burroughs [[DisSimile but straight, younger, a sportswriter, a gun nut, and focused more on nonfiction]]. Most Thompson fans have at least a liking for Burroughs, and vice versa.

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Despite his personal troubles and the controversy surrounding his work, Burroughs became highly influential and respected by a wide variety of younger artists, most notably, the more famous beat writers Jack Kerouac and Creator/AllenGinsberg. After experimenting with the cut-up technique, he almost pioneered the graphic novel form (Creator/AlanMoore openly cites Burroughs as a prominent inspiration), but couldn't get the funds, because of the expenses of color copying. His works have also served as an important influence on CyberPunk and NewWaveScienceFiction (the ''Nova Trilogy'', as science fiction itself, is considered a sort of prototype of the New Wave). The actual {{punk}} scene owes a great deal to Burroughs, as well, with his return to America in 1974 being feted by a large number of punks and related artists (including Music/PattiSmith); the Godfather of Punk Music/IggyPop was such a big fan ("Lust for Life" is merely his most obvious example of Burroughs fandom) that when the BBC did a radio biography of Burroughs, he was chosen to present it. And of course, there's his literary heir, HunterSThompson, who was basically Burroughs [[DisSimile but straight, younger, a sportswriter, a gun nut, and focused more on nonfiction]]. Most Thompson fans have at least a liking for Burroughs, and vice versa.
7th Feb '15 4:55:35 PM karstovich2
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Despite his personal troubles and the controversy surrounding his work, Burroughs became highly influential and respected by a wide variety of younger artists, most notably, the more famous beat writers Jack Kerouac and Creator/AllenGinsberg. After experimenting with the cut-up technique, he almost pioneered the graphic novel form (Creator/AlanMoore openly cites Burroughs as a prominent inspiration), but couldn't get the funds, because of the expenses of color copying. His works have also served as an important influence on CyberPunk and NewWaveScienceFiction (the ''Nova Trilogy'', as science fiction itself, is considered a sort of prototype of the New Wave). And of course, there's his literary heir, HunterSThompson, who was basically Burroughs [[DisSimile but straight, younger, a sportswriter, a gun nut, and focused more on nonfiction]]. Most Thompson fans have at least a liking for Burroughs, and vice versa.

to:

Despite his personal troubles and the controversy surrounding his work, Burroughs became highly influential and respected by a wide variety of younger artists, most notably, the more famous beat writers Jack Kerouac and Creator/AllenGinsberg. After experimenting with the cut-up technique, he almost pioneered the graphic novel form (Creator/AlanMoore openly cites Burroughs as a prominent inspiration), but couldn't get the funds, because of the expenses of color copying. His works have also served as an important influence on CyberPunk and NewWaveScienceFiction (the ''Nova Trilogy'', as science fiction itself, is considered a sort of prototype of the New Wave). The actual {{punk}} scene owes a great deal to Burroughs, as well, with his return to America in 1974 being feted by a large number of punks and related artists (including Music/PattiSmith); Music/IggyPop was such a big fan ("Lust for Life" is merely his most obvious example of Burroughs fandom) that when the BBC did a radio biography of Burroughs, he was chosen to present it. And of course, there's his literary heir, HunterSThompson, who was basically Burroughs [[DisSimile but straight, younger, a sportswriter, a gun nut, and focused more on nonfiction]]. Most Thompson fans have at least a liking for Burroughs, and vice versa.
12th Dec '14 1:59:44 AM Patachou
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* ''The Black Rider'', a [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructed]] PostModern RockOpera version of ''Theatre/DerFreischutz'' created by Robert Wilson. Burroughs wrote the lyrics for the songs, with music by Tom Waits.

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* ''The Black Rider'', ''Music/TheBlackRider'', a [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructed]] PostModern RockOpera version of ''Theatre/DerFreischutz'' created by Robert Wilson. Burroughs wrote the lyrics for the songs, with music by Tom Waits.
4th Dec '14 7:08:12 PM JakesBrain
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* ''The Nova Trilogy'': A SpaceOpera about a group of extraterrestrial terrorists called the 'Nova Mob' who want to ignite the earth into an exploding Super Nova by creating insoluble conflicts. They can only be stopped by the Nova Police, who understand that "Nobody, on any planet, wants to see a police officer". Thought to be [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible nigh unreadable]] because of Burrough's extensive use of the 'cut-up' technique, which involves cutting up a page of text into four pieces and re-arranging them to create new text. Although contrary to the claims of bewildered skeptics, the observant reader, if patient, can see a fairly reliable pattern emerge. Usually, a chapter will start out fairly straightforward, with normal prose and everything, then after the bulk of the story is told, the reader will become aware that they're reading the same story, only "cut-up" and may become aware of new connotations and subtleties not noticed in the original. Passages will sometimes descend into strings of seemingly random cut-up images. If taken into account that this was Burroughs' attempt to introduce the montage technique of film into literature, some of the more incoherent passages will begin to make a lot more sense.
--> Includes:
--> The Soft Machine
--> The Ticket that Exploded
--> Nova Express

to:

* The Nova Trilogy (''The Soft Machine'', ''The Nova Trilogy'': Ticket That Exploded'', ''Nova Express''): A SpaceOpera about a group of extraterrestrial terrorists called the 'Nova Mob' who want to ignite the earth into an exploding Super Nova supernova by creating insoluble conflicts. They can only be stopped by the Nova Police, who understand their methods and know that "Nobody, on any planet, wants to see a police officer". Thought to be [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible nigh unreadable]] because of Burrough's extensive use of the 'cut-up' technique, which involves cutting up a page of text into four pieces and re-arranging them to create new text. Although contrary to the claims of bewildered skeptics, the observant reader, if patient, can see a fairly reliable pattern emerge. Usually, a chapter will start out fairly straightforward, with normal prose and everything, then after the bulk of the story is told, the reader will become aware that they're reading the same story, only "cut-up" and may become aware of new connotations and subtleties not noticed in the original. Passages will sometimes descend into strings of seemingly random cut-up images. If taken into account that this was Burroughs' attempt to introduce the montage technique of film into literature, some of the more incoherent passages will begin to make a lot more sense.
--> Includes:
--> The Soft Machine
--> The Ticket that Exploded
--> Nova Express
sense.



* The Third Mind: a collaboration with novelist Bryon Gysin in which the cut-up technique is discussed at length.
* ''Ah Pook Is Here'': Burroughs and Malcolm [=McNeil=]'s early attempt to elevate the graphic novel into an art form, named after the Mayan God of Death. Although sadly it was never completed due to the costs of color copying at the time (a hindrance Burroughs earlier faced when trying to publish ''The Third Mind'', his collaboration with Brion Gysin), some unfinished panels can be viewed [[http://www.burroughsmcneillart.com/ here]] allowing us to all know ''exactly'' what we missed. A plan by Fantagraphics to publish the work a couple years ago fell through, sadly.
* ''Literature/TheRedNightTrilogy'': Burrough's last great work; a psychedelic journey through six irradiated cities from the past that were struck by an asteroid from a red sky. The first chronicles a dual narrative about a psychic detective and some gay pirates, both which tangle together in the first of the six titular cities, Tamaghis. The second book follows a time-traveling old-western shootist, which somehow sets up the third's odyssey through the Egyptian Land of the Dead, culminating in a satisfying conclusion to Burroughs's mythology. Contains frequent [[ContinuityNod references and homages]] to earlier works and some of the most delicious [[AuthorTract opinion pieces]] and [[TakeThat elderly scorn]] ever written, as well as (thankfully) conservative use of the cut-up technique, these last three books can be taken as Burrough's final thesis in regards to his entire career.
--> Includes:
--> Cities of the Red Night
--> The Place of Dead Roads
--> The Western Lands

to:

* The ''The Third Mind: Mind'': a collaboration with novelist poet/painter Bryon Gysin Gysin, a long-time friend, in which the cut-up technique is discussed at length.
* ''Ah Pook Is Here'': Burroughs and Malcolm [=McNeil=]'s early attempt to elevate the graphic novel into an art form, named after the Mayan God of Death. Although sadly it was never completed due to the costs of color copying at the time (a hindrance Burroughs Burroughs and Brion Gysin earlier faced when trying to publish ''The Third Mind'', his collaboration with Brion Gysin), Mind''), some unfinished panels can be viewed [[http://www.burroughsmcneillart.com/ here]] allowing us to all know ''exactly'' what we missed. A plan by Fantagraphics to publish the work a couple years ago fell through, sadly.
* ''Literature/TheRedNightTrilogy'': Burrough's Literature/TheRedNightTrilogy (''Cities of the Red Night'', ''The Place of Dead Roads'', ''The Western Lands''): Burroughs's last great work; a psychedelic journey through six irradiated cities from the past that were struck by an asteroid from a red sky. The first chronicles a dual narrative about a psychic detective and some gay pirates, both which tangle together in the first of the six titular cities, Tamaghis. The second book follows a time-traveling old-western shootist, which somehow sets up the third's odyssey through the Egyptian Land of the Dead, culminating in a satisfying conclusion to Burroughs's mythology. Contains frequent [[ContinuityNod references and homages]] to earlier works and some of the most delicious [[AuthorTract opinion pieces]] and [[TakeThat elderly scorn]] ever written, as well as (thankfully) conservative use of the cut-up technique, these last three books can be taken as Burrough's final thesis in regards to his entire career.
--> Includes:
--> Cities of the Red Night
--> The Place of Dead Roads
--> The Western Lands
career.



* ''My Education'': A collection of forty years worth of dreams, this was Burroughs' last full-length novel, published as a postscript to the Red Night Trilogy.

to:

* ''My Education'': A collection of forty years years' worth of dreams, this was Burroughs' last full-length novel, published as a postscript to the Red Night Trilogy.
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