History Creator / WilkieCollins

8th Sep '17 8:01:10 AM john_e
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* WriterOnBoard: A complaint about his later books. As Swinburne put it:
-->What brought good Wilkie’s genius nigh perdition? \\
Some demon whispered –“Wilkie, have a mission!”
5th Sep '17 12:06:30 PM john_e
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/ManAndWife''



* AccidentalMarriage: In ''Man and Wife'', Geoffrey Delamyn and Anne Silvester accidentally get legally married in 19th century Scotland by each writing a note referring to the other as their spouse. At the same time, Geoffrey is trying to get rid of Anne by manipulating his friend Arnold into posing in public as her husband -- believing that this will cause Anne and Arnold to become married. One of Collins' reasons for writing the book was to encourage reform to Scottish marriage law.



* CharacterFilibuster: Sir Patrick in ''Man and Wife'' delivers a chapter-long argument against the era's obsession with physical fitness over moral fitness.



* IHaveThisFriend: Geoffrey in ''Man and Wife'' asks Sir Patrick for advice on Scottish marriage law, saying it's for a friend. In one sense it is -- the friend is Arnold, whose actions may have got him accidentally married to Anne. But he's also asking for personal reasons: if Anne is married to Arnold, that gets her out of Geoffrey's hair.
* ILoveYouBecauseICantControlYou: In ''Man and Wife'', Mrs Glenarm is smitten with Geoffrey because in matters of athletic training, he's completely immune to her powers of persuasion.



* JerkJock: Geoffrey Delamayn, the villain of ''Man and Wife'' -- a man whom everybody admires for his physical fitness, overlooking his moral degeneracy. In his EstablishingCharacterMoment, he's told to expect bad news, and is horrified at the thought that his favourite horse may be unwell. The bad news is actually that his father is seriously ill, which he takes far more calmly.
* KickTheDog: In ''Man and Wife'', Geoffrey kicks his mother's pet dog hard enough to break its ribs, which illustrates his character splendidly.



* MayDecemberRomance: ''Man and Wife'' concludes with the marriage of [[spoiler:Anne Silvester]] and [[spoiler:Sir Patrick Lundie]], although [[spoiler:Sir Patrick]] is decades older.



* OneSteveLimit:
** The aversion is a big plot point in ''Armadale'', which features five different characters named Allan Armadale: the "original" Allan Armadale, uncle of the one, father of the other Allan Armadale of the older generation of Armadales, who disowned the son to make the nephew his heir, starting the feud.
** ''Man and Wife'' opens with two school friends, Anne and Blanche. In a series of rapid timeskips they marry, give birth to identically-named daughters, and die. The main plotline then follows the younger Anne and Blanche.

to:

* OneSteveLimit:
**
OneSteveLimit: The aversion is a big plot point in ''Armadale'', which features five different characters named Allan Armadale: the "original" Allan Armadale, uncle of the one, father of the other Allan Armadale of the older generation of Armadales, who disowned the son to make the nephew his heir, starting the feud.
** ''Man and Wife'' opens with two school friends, Anne and Blanche. In a series of rapid timeskips they marry, give birth to identically-named daughters, and die. The main plotline then follows the younger Anne and Blanche.
feud.
5th Sep '17 6:02:59 AM john_e
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* KickTheDog: In ''Man and Wife'', Geoffrey kicks his mother's pet dog hard enough to break its ribs, which illustrates his character splendidly.
5th Sep '17 5:59:33 AM john_e
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ILoveYouBecauseICantControlYou: In ''Man and Wife'', Mrs Glenarm is smitten with Geoffrey because in matters of athletic training, he's completely immune to her powers of persuasion.
2nd Sep '17 12:03:29 PM john_e
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* IHaveThisFriend: Geoffrey in ''Man and Wife'' asks Sir Patrick for advice on Scottish marriage law, saying it's for a friend. In one sense it is -- the friend is Arnold, whose actions may have got him accidentally married to Anne. But he's also asking for personal reasons: if Anne is married to Arnold, that gets her out of Geoffrey's hair.



* OneSteveLimit: The aversion is a big plot point in ''Armadale'', which features five different characters named Allan Armadale: the "original" Allan Armadale, uncle of the one, father of the other Allan Armadale of the older generation of Armadales, who disowned the son to make the nephew his heir, starting the feud.

to:

* OneSteveLimit: OneSteveLimit:
**
The aversion is a big plot point in ''Armadale'', which features five different characters named Allan Armadale: the "original" Allan Armadale, uncle of the one, father of the other Allan Armadale of the older generation of Armadales, who disowned the son to make the nephew his heir, starting the feud.feud.
** ''Man and Wife'' opens with two school friends, Anne and Blanche. In a series of rapid timeskips they marry, give birth to identically-named daughters, and die. The main plotline then follows the younger Anne and Blanche.
1st Sep '17 6:00:14 AM john_e
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* CharacterFilibuster: Sir Patrick in ''Man and Wife'' delivers a chapter-long argument against the era's obsession with physical fitness over moral fitness.
31st Aug '17 6:09:50 AM john_e
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* JerkJock: Geoffrey Delamayn, the villain of ''Man and Wife'' -- a man whom everybody admires for his physical fitness, overlooking his moral degeneracy. In his EstablishingCharacterMoment, he's told to expect bad news, and is horrified at the thought that his favourite horse may be unwell. The bad news is actually that his father is seriously ill, which he takes far more calmly.
9th Aug '17 5:50:20 PM Tarlonniel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AndSomeOtherStuff: The chemicals used to make the poisonous gas in "Armadale".

to:

* AndSomeOtherStuff: The chemicals used to make the poisonous gas in "Armadale".''Armadale''.



* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: A sailor describes the heroine of "No Name" is described as having 'a clean run [[BuxomIsBetter fore]] and [[MaleGaze and aft]]'.

to:

* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: A sailor describes the heroine of "No Name" is described ''No Name'' as having 'a "a clean run [[BuxomIsBetter fore]] and [[MaleGaze and aft]]'.aft]]".



* InnOfNoReturn: In "A Terribly Strange Bed"
* MakeItLookLikeAnAccident: In "The Fallen Leaves" one character takes care to make their suicide look like an accidental overdose.

to:

* InnOfNoReturn: In "A ''A Terribly Strange Bed"
Bed''.
* MakeItLookLikeAnAccident: In "The ''The Fallen Leaves" Leaves'' one character takes care to make their suicide look like an accidental overdose.



* MurphysBed: In "A Terribly Strange Bed"
* OneSteveLimit: The aversion is a big plot point in ''Armadale'', which features ''four'' different characters named Allan Armadale.
** Five, if you count the "original" Allan Armadale, uncle of the one, father of the other Allan Armadale of the older generation of Armadales, who disowned the son to make the nephew his heir starting the feud.
* TheOphelia: Simple Sally in "The Fallen Leaves", though her mental health improves once she's rescued from her life as a prostitute.

to:

* MurphysBed: In "A ''A Terribly Strange Bed"
Bed''.
* OneSteveLimit: The aversion is a big plot point in ''Armadale'', which features ''four'' five different characters named Allan Armadale.
** Five, if you count
Armadale: the "original" Allan Armadale, uncle of the one, father of the other Allan Armadale of the older generation of Armadales, who disowned the son to make the nephew his heir heir, starting the feud.
* TheOphelia: Simple Sally in "The ''The Fallen Leaves", Leaves'', though her mental health improves once she's rescued from her life as a prostitute.
14th Feb '17 12:59:35 PM Kitchen90
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:209:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wilkie_collins_portrait.png]]
14th Dec '16 3:24:31 PM Xtifr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''William Wilkie Collins''' (1824 – 1889) was an English writer best known for his novels ''Literature/TheWomanInWhite'' and ''Literature/TheMoonstone'' (arguably the first detective novel in English literature).

to:

'''William William Wilkie Collins''' Collins (1824 – 1889) was an English writer best known for his novels ''Literature/TheWomanInWhite'' and ''Literature/TheMoonstone'' (arguably the first detective novel in English literature).
This list shows the last 10 events of 18. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.WilkieCollins