History Creator / StephenKing

19th Jan '17 5:19:35 AM Morgenthaler
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* UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents: Being a Down-Easter himself, King has a knack for accurately depicting the various dialects of the northeastern corner of the country -- mostly Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, and (especially) Maine.
19th Jan '17 5:19:06 AM Morgenthaler
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* CthulhuMythos: King is a great admirer of Creator/HPLovecraft, and as detailed below, has included both overt and subtle homages in his own work.
18th Jan '17 2:05:21 AM SventheCrusader
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* ''Literature/MrMercedes'' -- King's "first hard-boiled detective book" about an ex-cop tracking down a mass murderer. Slated for a miniseries adaptation in 2018, starring Creator/BrendanGleeson in the lead role. Creator/AntonYelchin was set to star alongside Gleeson as antagonist Brady Hartsfield, but died before filming began.

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* ''Literature/MrMercedes'' -- King's "first hard-boiled detective book" about an ex-cop tracking down a mass murderer. Slated for a miniseries adaptation in 2018, starring Creator/BrendanGleeson in the lead role. Creator/AntonYelchin was set to star alongside Gleeson as antagonist protagonist Bill Hodges and Harry Treadaway as BigBad Brady Hartsfield, but died before filming began.replacing the late Creator/AntonYelchin.
1st Jan '17 4:55:24 AM ElectroKraken
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* AuthorExistenceFailure: Narrowly averted in 1999, when King was struck by a van while walking along a road. His personal brush with death was later incorporated into several of his works, including his ''Dark Tower'' series, which he hastened to complete so he wouldn't leave it unfinished if this trope came down for real. Oddly enough, he ended up long outliving the guy who hit him.



* LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition: Many of King's novels have been published as these by specialty presses. Some have even premiered as such; both ''Literature/TheGunslinger'' and ''Literature/TheEyesOfTheDragon'' took years after their limited edition to get published in trade format.



* NamesTheSame Often re-uses names from other books to describe completely different people. Examples include: Patrick Hockstetter, who was a Shop scientist in ''Literature/{{Firestarter}}'' and a sociopathic schoolmate of the Loser's Club in ''Literature/{{It}}''; Martin Coslaw, who was the nice, crippled hero of ''Literature/CycleOfTheWerewolf'' (and the film based on it, ''Film/SilverBullet'') and a cruel disciplinarian in ''Literature/{{Blaze}}''; he shows up a third time in ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' as a high school football player and actor. Similar to a ContinuityNod (above). Also, has used names of people in his own life to help name some of the characters as a form of ShoutOut (see below).



* OldShame:
** King pulled ''Literature/{{Rage}}'' out of circulation after its potential involvement in several school shootings. He still regrets it to this day.
** He despises ''Film/MaximumOverdrive'', frequently referencing it when discussing failures.



* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Tends to happen a lot with his earlier novels. He himself has said he's sometimes "too much a writer of the moment."
18th Dec '16 9:34:51 PM Willbyr
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* IAmNotSpock: Discussed in the afterword ''Literature/DifferentSeasons''. King recounts how around the time of his second and third books, his agent was fretting that he would be stereotyped as a horror writer, and King decided the hell with it and to go ahead and play into the stereotype. It seems to have worked out okay for him.

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* IAmNotSpock: [[invoked]] Discussed in the afterword of ''Literature/DifferentSeasons''. King recounts how around the time of his second and third books, his agent was fretting that he would be stereotyped as a horror writer, and King decided the hell with it and to go ahead and play into the stereotype. It seems to have worked out okay for him.
18th Dec '16 9:25:56 PM Willbyr
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* TheAlcoholic: Several characters, most notably Jack Torrance in ''Literature/TheShining'', Jim Gardener in ''Literature/TheTommyknockers'', and Danny Torrance in ''Literature/DoctorSleep''. King himself used to be an alcoholic.
** Several pages of Gardener's introduction feature a ''disturbing'' description of what alcoholism feels like from the drunk's perspective. The urge to drink is also explored heavily in ''Doctor Sleep''

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* TheAlcoholic: Several characters, most notably notably:
**
Jack Torrance in ''Literature/TheShining'', who tries to get his drinking under control but is undermined by the hotel;
**
Jim Gardener in ''Literature/TheTommyknockers'', and Danny Torrance in ''Literature/DoctorSleep''. King himself used to be an alcoholic.
** Several pages of Gardener's
whose introduction feature features a ''disturbing'' description of what alcoholism feels like from the drunk's perspective. The urge perspective;
** Danny Torrance in ''Literature/DoctorSleep'', who fell into drinking partly because of his legacy and partly
to drink is also explored heavily in ''Doctor Sleep''dull his shining.



* AnyoneCanDie: Important characters die in every book by him. It can be anyone, even the protagonist.

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* AnyoneCanDie: Important characters die Because King rarely starts out with a book's events graven in every book by him. It can be anyone, even the protagonist.stone, as a consequence no character is safe.



* ArtifactOfDeath: The cymbal-clanging wind-up toy from "The Monkey".

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* ArtifactOfDeath: The cymbal-clanging wind-up toy from "The Monkey".Monkey", whose playing precedes someone's violent death.



** A somewhat bizarre case seems to show up not in his writing, but in the commentaries he does on the DVD versions of his mini-series. He always: 1) praises the mini-series format, and 2) bashes War and Remembrance for (according to him) single-handedly destroying the mini-series format.

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** A somewhat bizarre case seems to show up not in his writing, but in the commentaries he does on the DVD versions of his mini-series. He always: 1) praises the mini-series format, and 2) bashes War ''War and Remembrance Remembrance'' for (according to him) single-handedly destroying the mini-series format.



** King's previous career as a high school English teacher heavily informs the plot of ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'', where the protagonist is a high school English teacher who [[spoiler: fakes his credentials in the past to get a teaching job in Texas while working to prevent the Kennedy assassination]].

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** King's previous career as a high school English teacher heavily informs the plot of ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'', where the protagonist is a high school English teacher who [[spoiler: fakes [[spoiler:fakes his credentials in the past to get a teaching job in Texas while working to prevent the Kennedy assassination]].



* AuthorAvatar: [[spoiler:King writes himself in as an important character in ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'' books, where in a parallel universe, the action of him writing the books affects the outcome of the main characters' lives.]] Also, there's the tendency of his main characters being writers (See below) and their ability to be described as "like Stephen King, but..."
* AuthorExistenceFailure: Narrowly averted in 1999, when King was struck by a van while walking along a road. His personal brush with death was later incorporated into several of his works, including his ''Dark Tower'' series, which he hastened to complete so he wouldn't leave it unfinished if this trope came down for real.
** Oddly enough, he ended up long outliving the guy who hit him.

to:

* AuthorAvatar: [[spoiler:King writes himself in as an important character in ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'' books, where in a parallel universe, the action of him writing the books affects the outcome of the main characters' lives.]] Also, there's the tendency of his main characters being writers (See (see below) and their ability to be described as "like Stephen King, but..."
* AuthorExistenceFailure: Narrowly averted in 1999, when King was struck by a van while walking along a road. His personal brush with death was later incorporated into several of his works, including his ''Dark Tower'' series, which he hastened to complete so he wouldn't leave it unfinished if this trope came down for real.
**
real. Oddly enough, he ended up long outliving the guy who hit him.



* BilledAboveTheTitle: You will never have any doubt whether Stephen King is the author of a book or not, because you can't miss the words "'''STEPHEN KING'''" taking up almost the entire front cover. With a little tiny spot at the very bottom for the actual title of the book. Ironically, many non-horror films adapted from his work, including "Stand by Me," "The Shawshank Redemption," and "Dolores Claiborne" (in other words, the best of them) have avoided using his name for the simple reason that consumers would mistake them for horror films when they were not.

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* BilledAboveTheTitle: You will never have any doubt whether Stephen King is the author of a book or not, because you can't miss the words "'''STEPHEN KING'''" taking up almost the entire front cover. With cover, with a little tiny spot at the very bottom for the actual title of the book. Ironically, many non-horror films adapted from his work, including "Stand by Me," "The Shawshank Redemption," and "Dolores Claiborne" (in other words, the best of them) have avoided using his name for the simple reason that consumers would mistake them for horror films when they were not.



* BizarreTasteInFood : Several of his characters enjoy peanut butter and onion sandwiches.

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* BizarreTasteInFood : BizarreTasteInFood: Several of his characters enjoy peanut butter and onion sandwiches.



* BreakingAndBloodsucking: In "Film/TheNightFlier", the eponymous Night Flier pays a visit to the elderly Sarche couple. The following day, the husband shuts down the airfield and the wife visits the beauty parlor. The husband is found with his head torn off on one end of the trailer. The wife is found, her blood completely drained, in bed; with new lingerie, a peaceful expression, and a copy of ''Literature/TheVampireLestat''.

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* BreakingAndBloodsucking: In "Film/TheNightFlier", ''Film/TheNightFlier'', the eponymous Night Flier pays a visit to the elderly Sarche couple. The following day, the husband shuts down the airfield and the wife visits the beauty parlor. The husband is found with his head torn off on one end of the trailer. The wife is found, her blood completely drained, in bed; with new lingerie, a peaceful expression, and a copy of ''Literature/TheVampireLestat''.



* ContinuityNod: Many books make brief, casual, and often vague references to characters and/or events from previous King novels that may or may not have anything to do with the current novel, but that fans who have read those novels would be able to recognize.

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* ContinuityNod: Many books make brief, casual, and often vague references to characters and/or events from previous King novels that may or may not have anything to do with the current novel, but that fans who have read those novels would be able to recognize. [[http://laughingsquid.com/the-stephen-king-universe-a-very-detailed-flowchart-linking-his-books-characters/ This flowchart]] is a good place to start.



** [[http://laughingsquid.com/the-stephen-king-universe-a-very-detailed-flowchart-linking-his-books-characters/ Have a flowchart.]]



* CoverAlbum: If Stephen King were a musician (as something other than a side project, anyway), Nightmares & Dreamscapes would have been his album of covers, with stories paying salient homage to Lovecraft, A. Conan Doyle, Raymond Chandler, Edgar Allan Poe, and even delving into sports writing and poetry(!).

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* CoverAlbum: If Stephen King were a musician (as something other than a side project, anyway), Nightmares & Dreamscapes ''Nightmares and Dreamscapes'' would have been his album of covers, with stories paying salient homage to Lovecraft, A. Conan Doyle, Raymond Chandler, Edgar Allan Poe, and even delving into sports writing and poetry(!).



* CreatorCameo: King often makes cameo appearances in the film adaptations of his works; his high point probably being his portrayal of the eponymous hick in the ''Film/{{Creepshow}}'' segment "The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill."

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* CreatorCameo: CreatorCameo:
**
King often makes cameo appearances in the film adaptations of his works; his high point probably being his portrayal of the eponymous hick in the ''Film/{{Creepshow}}'' segment "The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill."



* FingerTwitchingRevival: Carrie's hand jutting out of the ground in the film. In "Autopsy Room Four," it's not the protag's ''finger'' that twitches, but same idea.

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* FingerTwitchingRevival: FingerTwitchingRevival:
**
Carrie's hand jutting out of the ground in the film. film.
**
In "Autopsy Room Four," it's not the protag's ''finger'' that twitches, but same idea.



** TropeCodifier.



* GreaterScopeVillain: With the CanonWelding: [[spoiler: the Crimson King]] becomes this.

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* GreaterScopeVillain: With the CanonWelding: [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the Crimson King]] becomes this.



*** In the introduction to ''Literature/DifferentSeasons'' King notes that after ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was published and his editor asked for a followup, he presented him with two: ''Literature/SalemsLot'' and ''Blaze''. The former was an homage to ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' (along with a little of ''Theatre/OurTown'') and the latter to ''Literature/OfMiceAndMen''. ''Blaze'' would not be published until many years later.

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*** ** In the introduction to ''Literature/DifferentSeasons'' King notes that after ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was published and his editor asked for a followup, he presented him with two: ''Literature/SalemsLot'' and ''Blaze''. The former was an homage to ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' (along with a little of ''Theatre/OurTown'') and the latter to ''Literature/OfMiceAndMen''. ''Blaze'' would not be published until many years later.



* IAmNotSpock: Discussed in the afterword ''Literature/DifferentSeasons''. King recounts how around the time of his second and third books, his agent was fretting that he would be stereotyped as a horror writer, and King decided the hell with it and to go ahead and play into the stereotype. [[{{Understatement}} It seems to have worked out okay for him.]]

to:

* IAmNotSpock: Discussed in the afterword ''Literature/DifferentSeasons''. King recounts how around the time of his second and third books, his agent was fretting that he would be stereotyped as a horror writer, and King decided the hell with it and to go ahead and play into the stereotype. [[{{Understatement}} It seems to have worked out okay for him.]]



* MonsterClown: Pennywise is a [[{{Pun}} shining example]].
* MostWritersAreWriters: Started with Sue Snell in ''Literature/{{Carrie}}''. Mike Noonan in ''Literature/BagOfBones'', Bill Denbrough in ''Literature/{{IT}}'', and others.

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* MonsterClown: Pennywise is a [[{{Pun}} [[JustForPun shining example]].
* MostWritersAreWriters: Started with Sue Snell in ''Literature/{{Carrie}}''. Other prominent writer characters include Mike Noonan in ''Literature/BagOfBones'', ''Literature/BagOfBones'' and Bill Denbrough in ''Literature/{{IT}}'', and others.''Literature/{{IT}}''.



** In a reissued collection of the "Bachman" books, King wrote a [[OverlyLongGag very long introduction]] giving various reasons why he chose to use a pen name for some of his stories. It seemed to boil down to "because I felt like it". Although in recent years, he has stated he wanted to see if his books were selling well just because of his name, or because his books were actually good. He has stated that the Bachman stories tend toward a much more pessimistic and cynical view of the world (both from the characters' and the writer's perspective) and are much more likely to end on a downer note, often with [[spoiler: the death of the protagonist.]]

to:

** In a reissued collection of the "Bachman" books, King wrote a [[OverlyLongGag very long introduction]] giving various reasons why he chose to use a pen name for some of his stories. It seemed to boil down to "because I felt like it". Although in recent years, he has stated he wanted to see if his books were selling well just because of his name, or because his books were actually good. He has stated that the Bachman stories tend toward a much more pessimistic and cynical view of the world (both from the characters' and the writer's perspective) and are much more likely to end on a downer note, often with [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the death of the protagonist.]]protagonist]].



* PhoneCallFromTheDead: This is the premise of "The New York Times at Special Bargain Rates", a surprisingly upbeat short story by Stephen King, of all people. A husband who died in a plane crash was trying to call his wife just before impact; she gets the call two days later, and gets to talk to him in the afterlife (which, apparently, is a bus station). She gets to say goodbye, and he warns her about a future disaster, which she manages to avoid.

to:

* PhoneCallFromTheDead: This is the premise of "The New York Times at Special Bargain Rates", a surprisingly upbeat short story by Stephen King, of all people.story. A husband who died in a plane crash was trying to call his wife just before impact; she gets the call two days later, and gets to talk to him in the afterlife (which, apparently, is a bus station). She gets to say goodbye, and he warns her about a future disaster, which she manages to avoid.


Added DiffLines:

18th Dec '16 8:48:56 PM Willbyr
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** "Literature/TheMangler" -- Demonically possessed dry cleaning machinery. Yes.

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** "Literature/TheMangler" -- Demonically possessed dry cleaning industrial laundry machinery. Yes.
18th Dec '16 6:28:39 PM Willbyr
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* ''Literature/SalemsLot'' - [[OurVampiresAreDifferent Vampires]] in a small town in Maine, and the efforts of a few to get rid of them. Made into two TV miniseries. King's first visit to the Creepy Small Town, which he keeps coming back to, under a variety of names and states. Notable that his publisher advised him ''not'' to have this as his second book, lest he be pigeonholed as a horror novelist. Guess they got over it. Later tied with ''The Dark Tower'' saga.
* ''Literature/TheShining'' - Winter spent in a haunted hotel. Cabin fever taken to the extreme. Twice adapted as movies; first a loose adaptation by Creator/StanleyKubrick, which King was not very satisfied with, then a more faithful TV miniseries scripted/watched over by King himself. The arguments about which version is "better" have been [[BrokenBase long and passionate]].
* ''Literature/NightShift'' - Anthology of short stories, several of which have been adapted into movies:
** "Children of the Corn" -- ''Film/DisciplesOfTheCrow'' and ''Film/ChildrenOfTheCorn1984''.
** ''Film/CatsEye'' -- Featured three Stephen King stories including two from this anthology, "The Ledge" and "Quitters, Inc."
** "Literature/TheMangler"
** "Trucks" -- adapted twice, once as ''Film/MaximumOverdrive'' and once more-faithfully as ''Film/{{Trucks}}''

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* ''Literature/SalemsLot'' - -- [[OurVampiresAreDifferent Vampires]] in a small town in Maine, and the efforts of a few to get rid of them. Made into two TV miniseries. King's first visit to the Creepy Small Town, which he keeps coming back to, under a variety of names and states. Notable that his publisher advised him ''not'' to have this as his second book, lest he be pigeonholed as a horror novelist. Guess they got over it. Later tied with ''The Dark Tower'' saga.
* ''Literature/TheShining'' - -- Winter spent in a haunted hotel. Cabin fever taken to the extreme. Twice adapted as movies; first a loose adaptation by Creator/StanleyKubrick, which King was not very satisfied with, then a more faithful TV miniseries scripted/watched over by King himself. The arguments about which version is "better" have been [[BrokenBase long and passionate]].
* ''Literature/NightShift'' - -- Anthology of short stories, several of which have been adapted into movies:
** "Children of the Corn" -- A couple ends up stranded in a town ruled by a degenerate cult. Adapted into two films, ''Film/DisciplesOfTheCrow'' and ''Film/ChildrenOfTheCorn1984''.
** ''Film/CatsEye'' -- Featured three Stephen King stories including two from this anthology, anthology:
***
"The Ledge" and -- A mob boss forces a man to walk around the ledge of his apartment.
***
"Quitters, Inc."
" -- A man goes to extreme measures to kick his smoking.
** "Literature/TheMangler"
"Literature/TheMangler" -- Demonically possessed dry cleaning machinery. Yes.
** "Trucks" -- adapted A passing comet somehow brings automobiles to life, and they go on a rampage. Adapted twice, once as ''Film/MaximumOverdrive'' and once more-faithfully as ''Film/{{Trucks}}''



** "Battleground" was adapted into a segment of the TNT miniseries ''Nightmares and Dreamscapes: From the Stories of Stephen King''.
** "The Boogeyman" and "The Woman in the Room" were both adapted into short films (the former directed by Jeffrey Schiro, the latter by Frank Darabont [''Film/TheShawshankRedemption'', ''Film/TheGreenMile'']), and packaged into a 1986 VHS presentation entitled ''Stephen King's Nightshift Collection''.
** "Literature/SometimesTheyComeBack" was adapted into a 1991 TV movie starring Tim Matheson. Two sequels followed: ''Sometimes They Come Back...Again'' (1996) and ''Sometimes They Come Back...For More'' (1999). Neither sequel had anything to do with the characters or events of the original.
** "One for The Road" takes place just outside of Jerusalem's Lot, after the events of ''Literature/SalemsLot''. A film version has been [[http://www.dreadcentral.com/news/88223/stephen-king-short-story-one-road-heading-screen/ announced]] for 2015.

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** "Battleground" was adapted -- A man is attacked in his home by tiny soldiers. Adapted into a segment of the TNT miniseries ''Nightmares and Dreamscapes: From the Stories of Stephen King''.
** "The Boogeyman" (a man confronts his childhood fear of the Boogeyman) and "The Woman in the Room" (a man struggles with the desire to euthanize his terminally ill mother) were both adapted into short films (the former directed by Jeffrey Schiro, the latter by Frank Darabont [''Film/TheShawshankRedemption'', ''Film/TheGreenMile'']), and packaged into a 1986 VHS presentation entitled ''Stephen King's Nightshift Collection''.
** "Literature/SometimesTheyComeBack" was adapted -- A teacher is attacked by the ghosts of the delinquents that killed his brother when they were kids. Adapted into a 1991 TV movie starring Tim Matheson. Two sequels followed: ''Sometimes They Come Back...Again'' (1996) and ''Sometimes They Come Back...For More'' (1999). Neither sequel had anything to do with the characters or events of the original.
** "One for The Road" takes place -- A follow-up to ''Literature/SalemsLot''. Residents of a town just outside of Jerusalem's Lot, after Lot try to save a man from the events of ''Literature/SalemsLot''.remaining vampires. A film version has been [[http://www.dreadcentral.com/news/88223/stephen-king-short-story-one-road-heading-screen/ announced]] for 2015.



* ''Literature/TheDeadZone'' - The protagonist is plagued by visions of a terrible future. Made into a movie starring Creator/ChristopherWalken (and directed by Creator/DavidCronenberg, no less), and then served as loose inspiration for a TV series. Notable as a prominent American novel containing [[spoiler:the "lone gunman" assassin figure as the main hero/protagonist]]; King has stated that his original concept was, "Could you make [[spoiler:Lee Harvey Oswald]] the good guy?"

to:

* ''Literature/TheDeadZone'' - -- The protagonist is plagued by visions of a terrible future. Made into a movie starring Creator/ChristopherWalken (and directed by Creator/DavidCronenberg, no less), and then served as loose inspiration for a TV series. future. Notable as a prominent American novel containing [[spoiler:the "lone gunman" assassin figure as the main hero/protagonist]]; King has stated that his original concept was, "Could you make [[spoiler:Lee Harvey Oswald]] the good guy?"guy?" Made into a movie starring Creator/ChristopherWalken (and directed by Creator/DavidCronenberg, no less), and then served as loose inspiration for a TV series.



* ''Literature/{{Cujo}}'' -- Mother and son trapped in TheAllegedCar by the titular rabid dog. Made into [[Film/{{Cujo}} a movie]] by Lewis Teague, who would go on to direct ''Film/CatsEye''. By this point, King's substance abuse was so bad that he ''cannot remember'' writing this book.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Cujo}}'' -- Mother and son trapped in TheAllegedCar by the titular rabid dog. Made into [[Film/{{Cujo}} a movie]] by Lewis Teague, who would go on to direct ''Film/CatsEye''. By this point, King's substance abuse was so bad that he ''cannot remember'' writing this book. Made into [[Film/{{Cujo}} a movie]] by Lewis Teague, who would go on to direct ''Film/CatsEye''.



** "Word Processor of the Gods" was also adapted as an episode of ''Series/TalesFromTheDarkside''.

to:

** "Word Processor of the Gods" was also -- A man uses a kludged-together word processor to rewrite reality. Also adapted as an episode of ''Series/TalesFromTheDarkside''.
18th Dec '16 6:02:50 PM Willbyr
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King's success did not come without hardship. During the '80s, he fell into severe drug and alcohol abuse, to the point that he claims to have almost no memory of writing ''Cujo''. He eventually got sober and has remained so ever since, and has incorporated the experience into many of his novels since then.



** Lester Coggins from ''Literature/UnderTheDome'' is a subversion of the usual example: while he is extremely religious and a bit crazy, [[spoiler: he confronts the ''real'' villain of the story and says that they have to confess to the people that they've been secretly running a drug operation, and said villain offs him in short order.]]

to:

** Lester Coggins from ''Literature/UnderTheDome'' is a subversion of the usual example: while he is extremely religious and a bit crazy, [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he confronts the ''real'' villain of the story and says that they have to confess to the people that they've been secretly running a drug operation, and said villain offs him in short order.]]order]].


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* StagingAnIntervention: At the height of King's addiction issues, his family and friends raided his office, gathered up all the drugs, cigarette butts, and beer cans they could find, and dumped them at King's feet to try to shock him into sobering up. It worked; King went into rehad and has remained clean and sober ever since.
18th Dec '16 5:29:12 PM Seanette
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* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' -- A man from the 2010s travels back in time to prevent the assassination of UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy. [[HitlersTimeTravelExemptionAct The results are... interesting.]] An adaptation in the form of a mini-series produced by Creator/JJAbrams and starring Creator/JamesFranco came out on Creator/Hulu in 2016. Has tenuous ties to ''The Dark Tower'' saga.

to:

* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' -- A man from the 2010s travels back in time to prevent the assassination of UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy. [[HitlersTimeTravelExemptionAct The results are... interesting.]] An adaptation in the form of a mini-series produced by Creator/JJAbrams and starring Creator/JamesFranco came out on Creator/Hulu Creator/{{Hulu}} in 2016. Has tenuous ties to ''The Dark Tower'' saga.
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