History Creator / SnorriSturluson

7th Feb '16 6:23:29 AM Freshmeat
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His ''other'' {{magnum opus}} is traditionally considered ''Literature/{{Heimskringla}}'', a massive chronicle of UsefulNotes/{{Norw|ay}}egian history; or, more accurately, a work moving from pseudohistory through {{historical fiction}} to history in its recounting of the lives of the kings of Norway from the [[TheTimeOfMyths time of the Aesir]] up to 1177 AD. There is, however, no absolute certainty on how much of ''Heimskringla'' is Snorri's personal creation, as it is an anonymous work and may be a collaboration of various writers.

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His ''other'' {{magnum opus}} major work is traditionally considered ''Literature/{{Heimskringla}}'', a massive chronicle of UsefulNotes/{{Norw|ay}}egian history; or, more accurately, a work moving from pseudohistory through {{historical fiction}} to history in its recounting of the lives of the kings of Norway from the [[TheTimeOfMyths time of the Aesir]] up to 1177 AD. There is, however, no absolute certainty on how much of ''Heimskringla'' is Snorri's personal creation, as it is an anonymous work and may be a collaboration of various writers.
23rd Sep '15 4:22:51 PM nombretomado
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Snorri's most famous work is the ''Literature/ProseEdda'', also known as ''Snorra Edda'' after its author. The ''Prose Edda'' is easily the single most important source for NorseMythology; not only because it records a lot of myths, but because it attempts to actually explain them and to describe them systematically. Without ''Snorra Edda'', much of the ''Literature/PoeticEdda'' and many other sources on the matter would remain incomprehensible.

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Snorri's most famous work is the ''Literature/ProseEdda'', also known as ''Snorra Edda'' after its author. The ''Prose Edda'' is easily the single most important source for NorseMythology; Myth/NorseMythology; not only because it records a lot of myths, but because it attempts to actually explain them and to describe them systematically. Without ''Snorra Edda'', much of the ''Literature/PoeticEdda'' and many other sources on the matter would remain incomprehensible.



* {{Demythtification}}: Snorri tried to rationalize {{Norse mythology}} to fit it in with Christian cosmology and Classical history; consequently, he explained the Æsir as an advanced (yet human) nation of [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien magic-wielders who were remembered as gods]] by posterity.

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* {{Demythtification}}: Snorri tried to rationalize {{Norse Myth/{{Norse mythology}} to fit it in with Christian cosmology and Classical history; consequently, he explained the Æsir as an advanced (yet human) nation of [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien magic-wielders who were remembered as gods]] by posterity.
26th Apr '15 2:49:42 AM LordGro
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There is a hypothesis, grounded on an analysis of the vocabulary, that Snorri is also the author of ''Egil's Saga'', one of the big [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Sagas of Icelanders]]. Tentatively, Snorri might have taken an interest in Egil, as Egil was Snorri's own ancestor, and was considered Iceland's best poet from pagan times. Definite proof for that conjecture, however, is lacking.

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There is a hypothesis, grounded on an analysis of the vocabulary, that Snorri is also the author of ''Egil's Saga'', ''Literature/EgilsSaga'', one of the big [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Sagas of Icelanders]]. Tentatively, Snorri might have taken an interest in Egil, as Egil was Snorri's own ancestor, and was considered Iceland's best poet from pagan times. Definite proof for that conjecture, however, is lacking.
16th Mar '15 8:38:51 PM jormis29
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* {{Retcon}}: In the ''Snorra Edda'', Snorri claimed that Asgard, the city of the gods, was [[TheTrojanWar Troy]], but by the time he wrote ''Literature/{{Heimskringla}}'', he had scrapped that idea and described Asgard as a wholly different place, somewhere around southern Russia or the Caucasus.

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* {{Retcon}}: In the ''Snorra Edda'', Snorri claimed that Asgard, the city of the gods, was [[TheTrojanWar [[UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar Troy]], but by the time he wrote ''Literature/{{Heimskringla}}'', he had scrapped that idea and described Asgard as a wholly different place, somewhere around southern Russia or the Caucasus.
3rd Feb '15 11:52:21 AM LordGro
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[[caption-width-right:200: [-Statue in Bergen, Norway.-] ]]



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20th Dec '13 12:55:36 PM LordGro
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'''Snorri Sturluson''' (1179--September 23, 1241) was a [[TheHighMiddleAges medieval]] UsefulNotes/{{Iceland}}ic chieftain, landholder and political official, and a poet, historian and mythographer. [[SpellMyNameWithAnS His name may also be encountered]] spelt Snorre Sturlason (UsefulNotes/{{Norw|ay}}egian) or Snorre Sturlasson (UsefulNotes/{{Swed|en}}ish), but Snorri Sturluson is the recommended form in English, as it’s correct Icelandic and Old Norse. Note that Sturluson is a {{patronymic}}, not a family name; he is referred to as Snorri for short, not “Mr. Sturluson”. Snorri Sturluson is also not to be confused with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snorri_Thorfinnsson Snorri Thorfinnson]], considered to be the first European child born in what is now known as the Americas and was also instrumental in the Christianization of Iceland.

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'''Snorri Sturluson''' (1179--September 23, 1241) was a [[TheHighMiddleAges medieval]] UsefulNotes/{{Iceland}}ic chieftain, landholder and political official, and a poet, historian and mythographer. [[SpellMyNameWithAnS His name may also be encountered]] spelt Snorre Sturlason (UsefulNotes/{{Norw|ay}}egian) or Snorre Sturlasson (UsefulNotes/{{Swed|en}}ish), but Snorri Sturluson is the recommended form in English, as it’s correct Icelandic and Old Norse. Note that Sturluson is a {{patronymic}}, not a family name; he is referred to as Snorri for short, not “Mr. Sturluson”. Snorri Sturluson is also not to be confused with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snorri_Thorfinnsson Snorri Thorfinnson]], considered to be the first European child born in what is now known as the Americas and was also instrumental in the Christianization of Iceland."Mr. Sturluson".
16th Dec '13 3:34:21 PM blg
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'''Snorri Sturluson''' (1179--September 23, 1241) was a [[TheHighMiddleAges medieval]] UsefulNotes/{{Iceland}}ic chieftain, landholder and political official, and a poet, historian and mythographer. [[SpellMyNameWithAnS His name may also be encountered]] spelt Snorre Sturlason (UsefulNotes/{{Norw|ay}}egian) or Snorre Sturlasson (UsefulNotes/{{Swed|en}}ish), but Snorri Sturluson is the recommended form in English, as it’s correct Icelandic and Old Norse. Note that Sturluson is a {{patronymic}}, not a family name; he is referred to as Snorri for short, not “Mr. Sturluson”.

to:

'''Snorri Sturluson''' (1179--September 23, 1241) was a [[TheHighMiddleAges medieval]] UsefulNotes/{{Iceland}}ic chieftain, landholder and political official, and a poet, historian and mythographer. [[SpellMyNameWithAnS His name may also be encountered]] spelt Snorre Sturlason (UsefulNotes/{{Norw|ay}}egian) or Snorre Sturlasson (UsefulNotes/{{Swed|en}}ish), but Snorri Sturluson is the recommended form in English, as it’s correct Icelandic and Old Norse. Note that Sturluson is a {{patronymic}}, not a family name; he is referred to as Snorri for short, not “Mr. Sturluson”.
Sturluson”. Snorri Sturluson is also not to be confused with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snorri_Thorfinnsson Snorri Thorfinnson]], considered to be the first European child born in what is now known as the Americas and was also instrumental in the Christianization of Iceland.
12th Jan '13 5:03:48 AM Specialist290
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Soon after, Skule raised a rebellion to overthrow Håkon. He failed and was executed. Håkon regarded Snorri as a traitor and allied with Gissur, giving the latter free reign to kill Snorri, should Snorri not surrender himself to Håkon. Snorri did not submit, and eventually was successfully attacked by the Haukdælir clan in his house at Reykholt, where, at the age of 63, he was killed with an axe-blow.

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Soon after, Skule raised a rebellion to overthrow Håkon. He failed and was executed. Håkon regarded Snorri as a traitor and allied with Gissur, giving the latter free reign rein to kill Snorri, should Snorri not surrender himself to Håkon. Snorri did not submit, and eventually was successfully attacked by the Haukdælir clan in his house at Reykholt, where, at the age of 63, he was killed with an axe-blow.
28th Jul '12 5:43:02 AM LordGro
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Snorri's most famous work is the ''Literature/ProseEdda'', also known as ''Snorra Edda'' after its author. The ''Prose Edda'' is easily the single most important source for NorseMythology; not only because it records a lot of myths, but because it attempts to actually explain them and to describe them systematically. Without ''Snorra Edda'', much of the ''Poetic Edda'' and many other sources on the matter would remain incomprehensible.

to:

Snorri's most famous work is the ''Literature/ProseEdda'', also known as ''Snorra Edda'' after its author. The ''Prose Edda'' is easily the single most important source for NorseMythology; not only because it records a lot of myths, but because it attempts to actually explain them and to describe them systematically. Without ''Snorra Edda'', much of the ''Poetic Edda'' ''Literature/PoeticEdda'' and many other sources on the matter would remain incomprehensible.
27th Jul '12 12:45:54 PM LordGro
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Snorri is the single most famous author of medieval Iceland and Old Norse literature in general. His works are the first climax of the GoldenAge of Icelandic literature, during which the island produced the Eddas and the Literature/IcelandicSagas. This arose from the synergy of the introduction of foreign literature and learning, and a newfound interest of the Icelanders in their own history and the traditions of their pagan ancestors.

Snorri's most famous work is the ''Prose Edda'', also known as ''Snorra Edda'' after its author. The ''Prose Edda'' is easily the single most important source for NorseMythology; not only because it records a lot of myths, but because it attempts to actually explain them and to describe them systematically. Without ''Snorra Edda'', much of the ''Poetic Edda'' and many other sources on the matter would remain incomprehensible.

to:

Snorri is the single most famous author of medieval Iceland and Old Norse literature in general. His works are the first climax of the GoldenAge of Icelandic literature, during which the island produced the Eddas Literature/{{the Eddas}} and the Literature/IcelandicSagas. This arose from the synergy of the introduction of foreign literature and learning, and a newfound interest of the Icelanders in their own history and the traditions of their pagan ancestors.

Snorri's most famous work is the ''Prose Edda'', ''Literature/ProseEdda'', also known as ''Snorra Edda'' after its author. The ''Prose Edda'' is easily the single most important source for NorseMythology; not only because it records a lot of myths, but because it attempts to actually explain them and to describe them systematically. Without ''Snorra Edda'', much of the ''Poetic Edda'' and many other sources on the matter would remain incomprehensible.
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