History Creator / PBS

10th Sep '17 1:39:47 PM nombretomado
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* Children's shows in the daytime. Over the years, this block, known as Creator/PBSKids since 1993, has included ''Series/SesameStreet'', ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood'', ''Series/ReadingRainbow'', ''WesternAnimation/WordGirl'', ''BillNyeTheScienceGuy'', ''TheMagicSchoolBus'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'', ''DragonTales'', ''Series/BarneyAndFriends'' and ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}''. PBS has generally placed a strong emphasis on [[EdutainmentShow education]] and [[AnAesop Aesops]] with its kids' shows, even when children's programming on other networks started getting more geared towards [[MerchandiseDriven selling toys]]. People who grew up before children's programming started proliferating on cable (or even after, if they had parents who [[TheMoralSubstitute objected to]] the MerchandiseDriven nature of many {{Saturday morning cartoon}}s) were probably raised on PBS.

to:

* Children's shows in the daytime. Over the years, this block, known as Creator/PBSKids since 1993, has included ''Series/SesameStreet'', ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood'', ''Series/ReadingRainbow'', ''WesternAnimation/WordGirl'', ''BillNyeTheScienceGuy'', ''Series/BillNyeTheScienceGuy'', ''TheMagicSchoolBus'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'', ''DragonTales'', ''Series/BarneyAndFriends'' and ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}''. PBS has generally placed a strong emphasis on [[EdutainmentShow education]] and [[AnAesop Aesops]] with its kids' shows, even when children's programming on other networks started getting more geared towards [[MerchandiseDriven selling toys]]. People who grew up before children's programming started proliferating on cable (or even after, if they had parents who [[TheMoralSubstitute objected to]] the MerchandiseDriven nature of many {{Saturday morning cartoon}}s) were probably raised on PBS.
14th Jul '17 5:38:08 PM ryanasaurus0077
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* ''Series/AreYouBeingServed''
* ''Series/BlakesSeven''

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* ''Series/AreYouBeingServed''
''Series/AreYouBeingServed''[[note]]Premiered on PBS in 1987, with the original roster consisting of a mere 24 stations.[[/note]]
* ''Series/BlakesSeven'' ''Series/AsTimeGoesBy''
* ''Series/BlakesSeven''



* ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[note]]While the original series was seen on practically every PBS station, the new series is another issue. The BBC currently gives the US distribution rights first to BBC America, where they will hang on to the new episodes for about a year before handing it over to PBS. And even then, not all PBS stations still show the new episodes. As of this writing, the only stations that still show new episodes are: WTTW in Chicago, IL, WPT in Madison, WI, KLRU in Austin, TX, WETA in Washington D.C., OETA in Oklahoma City, OK, and IPTV for the entire state of Iowa.[[/note]]

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[note]]While ''Series/DocMartin''[[note]]Broadcast on PBS stations courtesy of APT beginning in 2007.[[/note]]
* ''Series/DoctorWho''[[note]]While
the original series was seen on practically every PBS station, the new series is another issue. The BBC currently gives the US distribution rights first to BBC America, where they will hang on to the new episodes for about a year before handing it over to PBS. And even then, not all PBS stations still show the new episodes. As of this writing, the only stations that still show new episodes are: WTTW in Chicago, IL, WPT in Madison, WI, KLRU in Austin, TX, WETA in Washington D.C., OETA in Oklahoma City, OK, and IPTV for the entire state of Iowa.[[/note]]



* ''Series/FatherBrown''



* ''Series/KeepingUpAppearances''

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* ''Series/KeepingUpAppearances''''Series/KeepingUpAppearances''[[note]]Premiered on PBS in 1991.[[/note]]
* ''Series/LastOfTheSummerWine''[[note]]Originally broadcast on A&E before moving to PBS stations.[[/note]]


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* ''Series/MidsomerMurders''[[note]]Broadcast on A&E from 1998 until their NetworkDecay in 2002, and then on The Biography Channel until 2007; APT picked it up for broadcast on PBS stations in 2009.[[/note]]


Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/MooneBoy''
* ''Series/OpenAllHours''[[note]]Broadcast on A&E beginning on September 3, 1982, the complete series has been broadcast on PBS stations since 1985.[[/note]]


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* ''Series/{{Spy}}''


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* ''Series/WaitingForGod''
11th Jul '17 6:20:08 PM nombretomado
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PBS' first incarnation was the Educational Television and Radio Center in 1952, originally a private network set up by the Ford Foundation's Fund for Adult Education in order to serve as an educational television service complementing the entertainment programming of the commercial networks. Unique among American networks, content was produced not by the network itself, but by the individual stations -- a model similar to that of the (then {{West|Germany}}-) [[GermanTVStations German public broadcasting]], which had been imposed on them at the end of WorldWarII by the Western Allies. This led to content that was ''very'' in-depth in its subject matter, but also very dry, academic, low-budget and dull. As a result, ETRC floundered in its early years, earning the nickname "The University of the Air".

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PBS' first incarnation was the Educational Television and Radio Center in 1952, originally a private network set up by the Ford Foundation's Fund for Adult Education in order to serve as an educational television service complementing the entertainment programming of the commercial networks. Unique among American networks, content was produced not by the network itself, but by the individual stations -- a model similar to that of the (then {{West|Germany}}-) [[GermanTVStations German public broadcasting]], which had been imposed on them at the end of WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII by the Western Allies. This led to content that was ''very'' in-depth in its subject matter, but also very dry, academic, low-budget and dull. As a result, ETRC floundered in its early years, earning the nickname "The University of the Air".
29th May '17 10:11:17 PM nombretomado
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* Children's shows in the daytime. Over the years, this block, known as Creator/PBSKids since 1993, has included ''Series/SesameStreet'', ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood'', ''Series/ReadingRainbow'', ''WordGirl'', ''BillNyeTheScienceGuy'', ''TheMagicSchoolBus'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'', ''DragonTales'', ''Series/BarneyAndFriends'' and ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}''. PBS has generally placed a strong emphasis on [[EdutainmentShow education]] and [[AnAesop Aesops]] with its kids' shows, even when children's programming on other networks started getting more geared towards [[MerchandiseDriven selling toys]]. People who grew up before children's programming started proliferating on cable (or even after, if they had parents who [[TheMoralSubstitute objected to]] the MerchandiseDriven nature of many {{Saturday morning cartoon}}s) were probably raised on PBS.

to:

* Children's shows in the daytime. Over the years, this block, known as Creator/PBSKids since 1993, has included ''Series/SesameStreet'', ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood'', ''Series/ReadingRainbow'', ''WordGirl'', ''WesternAnimation/WordGirl'', ''BillNyeTheScienceGuy'', ''TheMagicSchoolBus'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'', ''DragonTales'', ''Series/BarneyAndFriends'' and ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}''. PBS has generally placed a strong emphasis on [[EdutainmentShow education]] and [[AnAesop Aesops]] with its kids' shows, even when children's programming on other networks started getting more geared towards [[MerchandiseDriven selling toys]]. People who grew up before children's programming started proliferating on cable (or even after, if they had parents who [[TheMoralSubstitute objected to]] the MerchandiseDriven nature of many {{Saturday morning cartoon}}s) were probably raised on PBS.
10th May '17 1:09:22 AM glickmam
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Some local PBS stations create their own content, but most buy content produced by others. The largest content producer in the country is UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}'s WGBH, which has produced shows like the science documentary series ''Nova'' and the {{edutainment}} show ''Series/{{ZOOM}}''. And while we're on the subject, WGBH's [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEAQn1Zle5s ident]] (which has remained unchanged since ''1977'') happens to be pure [[NightmareFuel/VanityPlate Nightmare Fuel]] (as were some of PBS's [[VanityPlate own early logos]]). WQED in Pittsburgh was historically another major provider, but it gradually petered out (with the end of the ''Neighborhood'' in 2001, it ceased to produce nationally-distributed programming). Similarly, WTTW of Chicago's output has dwindled in recent years; in the past it provided ''Series/SiskelAndEbert'' their first TV series, ''The Frugal Gourmet'', ''Lamb-Chop's Play Along'' as well as a revival of ''Series/Kidsongs'' on television. It still co-produced ''The [=McLaughlin=] Group'' for both PBS and network stations until creator, executive producer, and host John [=McLaughlin=]'s death in 2016. WNET of New York also contributes major programming, including ''Frontline'', ''Great Performances'', ''American Masters'', ''Nature'', producing ''PBS [=NewsHour=] Weekend'', and a large amount of PBS Kids programming. Some noteworthy programs broadcast throughout PBS' history include many of Ken Burns' documentaries and the controversial show ''An American Family'' in 1973, which is now viewed as the UrExample for the entire genre of [[RealityTV reality television]]. (The {{irony}} of a network with a reputation as highbrow as PBS inventing the RealityShow is not lost on some of us.) Some PBS affiliates also let other companies use their studios for filming non-PBS programs. An example is Philadelphia's WHYY, who had among other things, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s quintessential game show, ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'', as well as sister series ''Series/FindersKeepers'' and ''Series/ThinkFast'', taped at their facilities until Nick moved to Orlando- and Ride/UniversalStudios- in 1990.

to:

Some local PBS stations create their own content, but most buy content produced by others. The largest content producer in the country is UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}'s WGBH, which has produced shows like the science documentary series ''Nova'' and the {{edutainment}} show ''Series/{{ZOOM}}''. And while we're on the subject, WGBH's [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEAQn1Zle5s ident]] (which has remained unchanged since ''1977'') happens to be pure [[NightmareFuel/VanityPlate Nightmare Fuel]] (as were some of PBS's [[VanityPlate own early logos]]). WQED in Pittsburgh was historically another major provider, but it gradually petered out (with the end of the ''Neighborhood'' in 2001, it ceased to produce nationally-distributed programming). Similarly, WTTW of Chicago's output has dwindled in recent years; in the past it provided ''Series/SiskelAndEbert'' their first TV series, ''The Frugal Gourmet'', ''Lamb-Chop's Play Along'' as well as a revival of ''Series/Kidsongs'' ''Series/{{Kidsongs}}'' on television. It still co-produced ''The [=McLaughlin=] Group'' for both PBS and network stations until creator, executive producer, and host John [=McLaughlin=]'s death in 2016. WNET of New York also contributes major programming, including ''Frontline'', ''Great Performances'', ''American Masters'', ''Nature'', producing ''PBS [=NewsHour=] Weekend'', and a large amount of PBS Kids programming. Some noteworthy programs broadcast throughout PBS' history include many of Ken Burns' documentaries and the controversial show ''An American Family'' in 1973, which is now viewed as the UrExample for the entire genre of [[RealityTV reality television]]. (The {{irony}} of a network with a reputation as highbrow as PBS inventing the RealityShow is not lost on some of us.) Some PBS affiliates also let other companies use their studios for filming non-PBS programs. An example is Philadelphia's WHYY, who had among other things, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s quintessential game show, ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'', as well as sister series ''Series/FindersKeepers'' and ''Series/ThinkFast'', taped at their facilities until Nick moved to Orlando- and Ride/UniversalStudios- in 1990.
10th May '17 1:07:50 AM glickmam
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Some local PBS stations create their own content, but most buy content produced by others. The largest content producer in the country is UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}'s WGBH, which has produced shows like the science documentary series ''Nova'' and the {{edutainment}} show ''Series/{{ZOOM}}''. And while we're on the subject, WGBH's [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEAQn1Zle5s ident]] (which has remained unchanged since ''1977'') happens to be pure [[NightmareFuel/VanityPlate Nightmare Fuel]] (as were some of PBS's [[VanityPlate own early logos]]). WQED in Pittsburgh was historically another major provider, but it gradually petered out (with the end of the ''Neighborhood'' in 2001, it ceased to produce nationally-distributed programming). Similarly, WTTW of Chicago's output has dwindled in recent years; in the past it provided ''Series/SiskelAndEbert'' their first TV series, ''The Frugal Gourmet'', and ''Lamb-Chop's Play Along''. It still co-produced ''The [=McLaughlin Group=]'' for both PBS and network stations until John [=McLaughlin=]'s death in 2016. WNET of New York also contributes major programming, including ''Frontline'', ''Great Performances'', ''American Masters'', ''Nature'', producing ''PBS [=NewsHour=] Weekend'', and a large amount of PBS Kids programming. Some noteworthy programs broadcast throughout PBS' history include many of Ken Burns' documentaries and the controversial show ''An American Family'' in 1973, which is now viewed as the UrExample for the entire genre of [[RealityTV reality television]]. (The {{irony}} of a network with a reputation as highbrow as PBS inventing the RealityShow is not lost on some of us.) Some PBS affiliates also let other companies use their studios for filming non-PBS programs. An example is Philadelphia's WHYY, who had among other things, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s quintessential game show, ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'', as well as sister series ''Series/FindersKeepers'' and ''Series/ThinkFast'', taped at their facilities until Nick moved to Orlando- and Ride/UniversalStudios- in 1990.

to:

Some local PBS stations create their own content, but most buy content produced by others. The largest content producer in the country is UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}'s WGBH, which has produced shows like the science documentary series ''Nova'' and the {{edutainment}} show ''Series/{{ZOOM}}''. And while we're on the subject, WGBH's [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEAQn1Zle5s ident]] (which has remained unchanged since ''1977'') happens to be pure [[NightmareFuel/VanityPlate Nightmare Fuel]] (as were some of PBS's [[VanityPlate own early logos]]). WQED in Pittsburgh was historically another major provider, but it gradually petered out (with the end of the ''Neighborhood'' in 2001, it ceased to produce nationally-distributed programming). Similarly, WTTW of Chicago's output has dwindled in recent years; in the past it provided ''Series/SiskelAndEbert'' their first TV series, ''The Frugal Gourmet'', and ''Lamb-Chop's Play Along''. Along'' as well as a revival of ''Series/Kidsongs'' on television. It still co-produced ''The [=McLaughlin Group=]'' [=McLaughlin=] Group'' for both PBS and network stations until creator, executive producer, and host John [=McLaughlin=]'s death in 2016. WNET of New York also contributes major programming, including ''Frontline'', ''Great Performances'', ''American Masters'', ''Nature'', producing ''PBS [=NewsHour=] Weekend'', and a large amount of PBS Kids programming. Some noteworthy programs broadcast throughout PBS' history include many of Ken Burns' documentaries and the controversial show ''An American Family'' in 1973, which is now viewed as the UrExample for the entire genre of [[RealityTV reality television]]. (The {{irony}} of a network with a reputation as highbrow as PBS inventing the RealityShow is not lost on some of us.) Some PBS affiliates also let other companies use their studios for filming non-PBS programs. An example is Philadelphia's WHYY, who had among other things, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s quintessential game show, ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'', as well as sister series ''Series/FindersKeepers'' and ''Series/ThinkFast'', taped at their facilities until Nick moved to Orlando- and Ride/UniversalStudios- in 1990.
12th Mar '17 10:54:08 AM nombretomado
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* Children's shows in the daytime. Over the years, this block, known as Creator/PBSKids since 1993, has included ''Series/SesameStreet'', ''MisterRogersNeighborhood'', ''ReadingRainbow'', ''WordGirl'', ''BillNyeTheScienceGuy'', ''TheMagicSchoolBus'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'', ''DragonTales'', ''Series/BarneyAndFriends'' and ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}''. PBS has generally placed a strong emphasis on [[EdutainmentShow education]] and [[AnAesop Aesops]] with its kids' shows, even when children's programming on other networks started getting more geared towards [[MerchandiseDriven selling toys]]. People who grew up before children's programming started proliferating on cable (or even after, if they had parents who [[TheMoralSubstitute objected to]] the MerchandiseDriven nature of many {{Saturday morning cartoon}}s) were probably raised on PBS.

to:

* Children's shows in the daytime. Over the years, this block, known as Creator/PBSKids since 1993, has included ''Series/SesameStreet'', ''MisterRogersNeighborhood'', ''ReadingRainbow'', ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood'', ''Series/ReadingRainbow'', ''WordGirl'', ''BillNyeTheScienceGuy'', ''TheMagicSchoolBus'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'', ''DragonTales'', ''Series/BarneyAndFriends'' and ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}''. PBS has generally placed a strong emphasis on [[EdutainmentShow education]] and [[AnAesop Aesops]] with its kids' shows, even when children's programming on other networks started getting more geared towards [[MerchandiseDriven selling toys]]. People who grew up before children's programming started proliferating on cable (or even after, if they had parents who [[TheMoralSubstitute objected to]] the MerchandiseDriven nature of many {{Saturday morning cartoon}}s) were probably raised on PBS.
2nd Feb '17 7:45:37 AM Morgenthaler
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* News in the early evening. Their main news programs are the ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'' nightly newscast[[note]] the show had its' origin in anchors Robert [=MacNeil=] and Jim Lehrer being teamed for PBS' coverage of the Watergate hearings in 1973; WNET-13 in NYC then gave [=MacNeil=] his own half-hour program, ''The Robert [=MacNeil=] Report'' in October 1975, focusing initially on local, New York-area issues and with a half-hour runtime. Soon after, Jim Lehrer became co-anchor from Washington (WETA in Washington became co-producer), the show was renamed to ''The [=MacNeil=]/Lehrer Report'', and now commenced national PBS broadcasts. In September 1983, the program was modified to be more competitive with the "Big 3" newscasts, and became the ''The [=MacNeil=]/Lehrer [=NewsHour=]''; it was renamed in 1995 to ''The [=NewsHour=] with Jim Lehrer'' after [=MacNeil=] retired; and in 2009 it was renamed as the ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'', given it's status as PBS' most notable newscast, plus Lehrer's decreased prominence and a return to rotating co-anchors, setting the stage for his retirement in 2011.[[/note]] and the award-winning ''Frontline'' {{documentary}} series (not to be confused with [[{{Frontline}} the Australian series]]). Nearly all stations also run the ''Nightly Business Report''. Some stations also air ''[[Creator/TheBBC BBC World News America]]'', and a few stations might air local news broadcasts, such as WNET in New York, which, as a result of being licensed to Newark, NJ, must air semi-sister station NJTV's nightly news broadcasts.

to:

* News in the early evening. Their main news programs are the ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'' nightly newscast[[note]] the show had its' origin in anchors Robert [=MacNeil=] and Jim Lehrer being teamed for PBS' coverage of the Watergate hearings in 1973; WNET-13 in NYC then gave [=MacNeil=] his own half-hour program, ''The Robert [=MacNeil=] Report'' in October 1975, focusing initially on local, New York-area issues and with a half-hour runtime. Soon after, Jim Lehrer became co-anchor from Washington (WETA in Washington became co-producer), the show was renamed to ''The [=MacNeil=]/Lehrer Report'', and now commenced national PBS broadcasts. In September 1983, the program was modified to be more competitive with the "Big 3" newscasts, and became the ''The [=MacNeil=]/Lehrer [=NewsHour=]''; it was renamed in 1995 to ''The [=NewsHour=] with Jim Lehrer'' after [=MacNeil=] retired; and in 2009 it was renamed as the ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'', given it's status as PBS' most notable newscast, plus Lehrer's decreased prominence and a return to rotating co-anchors, setting the stage for his retirement in 2011.[[/note]] and the award-winning ''Frontline'' {{documentary}} series (not to be confused with [[{{Frontline}} [[Series/{{Frontline}} the Australian series]]). Nearly all stations also run the ''Nightly Business Report''. Some stations also air ''[[Creator/TheBBC BBC World News America]]'', and a few stations might air local news broadcasts, such as WNET in New York, which, as a result of being licensed to Newark, NJ, must air semi-sister station NJTV's nightly news broadcasts.
19th Jan '17 4:48:28 PM Xtifr
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PBS has gone largely unchanged since then. Programming and the stations themselves are sponsored by donations from corporations, charitable foundations and ViewersLikeYou. The federal government chips in, as well, by means of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which also funds Creator/{{NPR}} and public-radio programs. Instead of interrupting programs with commercials, PBS stations run a sponsor tag at the start and end of each program, and hype their other programs during a five-minute break at the end of each show. For a week or two every however-many months, they also run a [[{{Telethon}} pledge drive]], during which viewers are asked to donate money to help the station stay on the air. This is usually when they drag out their highest quality programs, such as concerts by the GratefulDead and [[Music/PinkFloyd David Gilmour]], and performances from the Austin City Limits festival, though this is also where you'll see endless self-help and financial gurus; it's just a matter of getting through the lengthy pledge breaks or predicting when they will end and put up the next show. Some stations take off programming for a few days to air an auction of products, services and trips where funding goes to the station, or "friends" of the station, a concept where an outside third party or an board is the one who makes programming purchase and scheduling decisions rather than station personnel.

to:

PBS has gone largely unchanged since then. Programming and the stations themselves are sponsored by donations from corporations, charitable foundations and ViewersLikeYou. The federal government chips in, as well, by means of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which also funds Creator/{{NPR}} and public-radio programs. Instead of interrupting programs with commercials, PBS stations run a sponsor tag at the start and end of each program, and hype their other programs during a five-minute break at the end of each show. For a week or two every however-many months, they also run a [[{{Telethon}} pledge drive]], during which viewers are asked to donate money to help the station stay on the air. This is usually when they drag out their highest quality programs, such as concerts by the GratefulDead Music/TheGratefulDead and [[Music/PinkFloyd David Gilmour]], and performances from the Austin City Limits festival, though this is also where you'll see endless self-help and financial gurus; it's just a matter of getting through the lengthy pledge breaks or predicting when they will end and put up the next show. Some stations take off programming for a few days to air an auction of products, services and trips where funding goes to the station, or "friends" of the station, a concept where an outside third party or an board is the one who makes programming purchase and scheduling decisions rather than station personnel.
28th Dec '16 8:19:08 AM themisterfree
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* News in the early evening. Their main news programs are the ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'' nightly newscast[[note]] the show had its' origin in anchors Robert [=MacNeil=] and Jim Lehrer being teamed for PBS' coverage of the Watergate hearings in 1973; WNET-13 in NYC then gave [=MacNeil=] his own half-hour program, ''The Robert [=MacNeil=] Report'' in October 1975, focusing initially on local, New York-area issues and with a half-hour runtime. Soon after, Jim Lehrer became co-anchor from Washington (marking WETA in Washington becoming a co-producer), and the show was renamed to ''The [=MacNeil=]/Lehrer Report'', and now commenced national PBS broadcasts. In September 1983, the program was modified to be more competitive with the "Big 3" newscasts, and became the ''The [=MacNeil=]/Lehrer [=NewsHour=]''; it was renamed in 1995 to ''The [=NewsHour=] with Jim Lehrer'' after [=MacNeil=] retired; in 2009 it was renamed as the ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'', given it's status as PBS' most notable newscast, plus Lehrer's decreased prominence and a return to rotating co-anchors, setting the stage for his retirement in 2011.[[/note]] and the award-winning ''Frontline'' {{documentary}} series (not to be confused with [[{{Frontline}} the Australian series]]). Nearly all stations also run the ''Nightly Business Report''. Some stations also air ''[[Creator/TheBBC BBC World News America]]'', and a few stations might air local news broadcasts, such as WNET in NYC, which, as a result of being licensed to Newark, NJ, must air semi-sister station NJTV's nightly news broadcasts.

to:

* News in the early evening. Their main news programs are the ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'' nightly newscast[[note]] the show had its' origin in anchors Robert [=MacNeil=] and Jim Lehrer being teamed for PBS' coverage of the Watergate hearings in 1973; WNET-13 in NYC then gave [=MacNeil=] his own half-hour program, ''The Robert [=MacNeil=] Report'' in October 1975, focusing initially on local, New York-area issues and with a half-hour runtime. Soon after, Jim Lehrer became co-anchor from Washington (marking WETA (WETA in Washington becoming a became co-producer), and the show was renamed to ''The [=MacNeil=]/Lehrer Report'', and now commenced national PBS broadcasts. In September 1983, the program was modified to be more competitive with the "Big 3" newscasts, and became the ''The [=MacNeil=]/Lehrer [=NewsHour=]''; it was renamed in 1995 to ''The [=NewsHour=] with Jim Lehrer'' after [=MacNeil=] retired; and in 2009 it was renamed as the ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'', given it's status as PBS' most notable newscast, plus Lehrer's decreased prominence and a return to rotating co-anchors, setting the stage for his retirement in 2011.[[/note]] and the award-winning ''Frontline'' {{documentary}} series (not to be confused with [[{{Frontline}} the Australian series]]). Nearly all stations also run the ''Nightly Business Report''. Some stations also air ''[[Creator/TheBBC BBC World News America]]'', and a few stations might air local news broadcasts, such as WNET in NYC, New York, which, as a result of being licensed to Newark, NJ, must air semi-sister station NJTV's nightly news broadcasts.



Some local PBS stations create their own content, but most buy content produced by others. The largest content producer in the country is UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}'s WGBH, which has produced shows like the science documentary series ''Nova'' and the {{edutainment}} show ''Series/{{ZOOM}}''. And while we're on the subject, WGBH's [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEAQn1Zle5s ident]] (which has remained unchanged since ''1977'') happens to be pure [[NightmareFuel/VanityPlate Nightmare Fuel]] (as were some of PBS's [[VanityPlate own early logos]]). WQED in Pittsburgh was historically another major provider, but it gradually petered out (with the end of the ''Neighborhood'' in 2001, it ceased to produce nationally-distributed programming). Similarly, WTTW of Chicago's output has dwindled in recent years; in the past it provided ''Series/SiskelAndEbert'' their first TV series, ''The Frugal Gourmet'', and ''Lamb-Chop's Play Along''; it still co-produces ''The [=McLaughlin Group=]'' for both PBS and network stations. WNET of New York also contributes major programming, including ''Frontline'', ''Great Performances'', ''American Masters'', ''Nature'', co-producing the ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'', and a large amount of PBS Kids programming. Some noteworthy programs broadcast throughout PBS' history include many of Ken Burns' documentaries and the controversial show ''An American Family'' in 1973, which is now viewed as the UrExample for the entire genre of [[RealityTV reality television]]. (The {{irony}} of a network with a reputation as highbrow as PBS inventing the RealityShow is not lost on some of us.) Some PBS affiliates also let other companies use their studios for filming non-PBS programs. An example is Philadelphia's WHYY, who had among other things, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s quintessential game show, ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'', as well as sister series ''Series/FindersKeepers'', and ''Series/ThinkFast'', taped at their facilities until Nick moved to Orlando in 1990.

to:

Some local PBS stations create their own content, but most buy content produced by others. The largest content producer in the country is UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}'s WGBH, which has produced shows like the science documentary series ''Nova'' and the {{edutainment}} show ''Series/{{ZOOM}}''. And while we're on the subject, WGBH's [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEAQn1Zle5s ident]] (which has remained unchanged since ''1977'') happens to be pure [[NightmareFuel/VanityPlate Nightmare Fuel]] (as were some of PBS's [[VanityPlate own early logos]]). WQED in Pittsburgh was historically another major provider, but it gradually petered out (with the end of the ''Neighborhood'' in 2001, it ceased to produce nationally-distributed programming). Similarly, WTTW of Chicago's output has dwindled in recent years; in the past it provided ''Series/SiskelAndEbert'' their first TV series, ''The Frugal Gourmet'', and ''Lamb-Chop's Play Along''; it Along''. It still co-produces co-produced ''The [=McLaughlin Group=]'' for both PBS and network stations. stations until John [=McLaughlin=]'s death in 2016. WNET of New York also contributes major programming, including ''Frontline'', ''Great Performances'', ''American Masters'', ''Nature'', co-producing the producing ''PBS [=NewsHour=]'', [=NewsHour=] Weekend'', and a large amount of PBS Kids programming. Some noteworthy programs broadcast throughout PBS' history include many of Ken Burns' documentaries and the controversial show ''An American Family'' in 1973, which is now viewed as the UrExample for the entire genre of [[RealityTV reality television]]. (The {{irony}} of a network with a reputation as highbrow as PBS inventing the RealityShow is not lost on some of us.) Some PBS affiliates also let other companies use their studios for filming non-PBS programs. An example is Philadelphia's WHYY, who had among other things, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s quintessential game show, ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'', as well as sister series ''Series/FindersKeepers'', ''Series/FindersKeepers'' and ''Series/ThinkFast'', taped at their facilities until Nick moved to Orlando Orlando- and Ride/UniversalStudios- in 1990.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.PBS