History Creator / PBS

5th Sep '16 7:53:48 AM ryanasaurus0077
Is there an issue? Send a Message
4th Sep '16 1:02:45 PM ryanasaurus0077
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/TheAmericanExperience''
25th Aug '16 5:03:42 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


As a government-run television network, PBS has been subjected to fights within the government over funding as far back as TheSixties ([[Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood Fred Rogers']] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXEuEUQIP3Q speech to the Senate]] in defense of the young network may just be his CrowningMomentOfAwesome). The usual cry of public television's opponents is that PBS was created in [[TheSixties a time]] when there were only [[Creator/{{CBS}} three]] [[Creator/{{NBC}} television]] [[Creator/{{ABC}} networks]] in the United States as opposed to over a hundred, and that the public need for it no longer exists in today's world of cable and satellite TV. Supporters, meanwhile, argue that PBS is essential for rural viewers and those who can't afford cable or satellite, that it provides things like science documentaries, hard-hitting investigative journalism and educational children's programming that would never last a day on commercial television, and that commercial educational channels are vulnerable to NetworkDecay.[[note]]The experience of the DiscoveryChannel, TheHistoryChannel, NickJr and TLC in the last several years bears that out pretty well.[[/note]] The large degree of control given to local affiliates is also a point of contention, with some people arguing that this is an outmoded, inefficient structure that should be replaced with something more centralized, and others saying that it's necessary for the community involvement for which PBS stations are known. Also, despite the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 prohibiting political bias in PBS broadcasting, it has been accused of such by both sides over the years ([[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment and let's just leave it at that]]). On at least one occasion, the reverse has happened: In 1982, Congress asked PBS to abandon its official neutral position in order to air the program ''Let Poland Be Poland'', which criticized the Soviet-enforced declaration of martial law in Poland in 1981.

to:

As a government-run television network, PBS has been subjected to fights within the government over funding as far back as TheSixties ([[Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood Fred Rogers']] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXEuEUQIP3Q speech to the Senate]] in defense of the young network may just be his CrowningMomentOfAwesome). The usual cry of public television's opponents is that PBS was created in [[TheSixties a time]] when there were only [[Creator/{{CBS}} three]] [[Creator/{{NBC}} television]] [[Creator/{{ABC}} networks]] in the United States as opposed to over a hundred, and that the public need for it no longer exists in today's world of cable and satellite TV. Supporters, meanwhile, argue that PBS is essential for rural viewers and those who can't afford cable or satellite, that it provides things like science documentaries, hard-hitting investigative journalism and educational children's programming that would never last a day on commercial television, and that commercial educational channels are vulnerable to NetworkDecay.[[note]]The experience of the DiscoveryChannel, TheHistoryChannel, NickJr Creator/DiscoveryChannel, Creator/TheHistoryChannel, Creator/NickJr and TLC in the last several years bears that out pretty well.[[/note]] The large degree of control given to local affiliates is also a point of contention, with some people arguing that this is an outmoded, inefficient structure that should be replaced with something more centralized, and others saying that it's necessary for the community involvement for which PBS stations are known. Also, despite the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 prohibiting political bias in PBS broadcasting, it has been accused of such by both sides over the years ([[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment and let's just leave it at that]]). On at least one occasion, the reverse has happened: In 1982, Congress asked PBS to abandon its official neutral position in order to air the program ''Let Poland Be Poland'', which criticized the Soviet-enforced declaration of martial law in Poland in 1981.
18th Aug '16 6:26:46 PM CJO123
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In 1967 the Ford Foundation, having invested over $130 million into a network that was still dependent on their contributions and grants, started to consider pulling its funding, causing many affiliate stations to consider turning to the federal government for financial assistance. As a result, the government passed the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, creating the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a semi-private[[note]]Its board is appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.[[/note]] corporation to fund NET. While it did this for a few years, it soon became clear that NET's documentary programming had not only alienated many of its affiliates, but also angered UsefulNotes/RichardNixon, who saw NET's documentaries as nothing more than propaganda against his administration. As a result, the CPB created the Public Broadcasting Service in 1969 as a new entity to take over network operations, and in 1970 NET was dissolved and merged into WNDT in [[{{Joisey}} Newark, New Jersey]] (which became WNET), ending its existence as a formal network. NET's decentralized system was retained by PBS, largely because the existing commercial {{networks}} and conservatives in Congress did ''not'' want an American version of the BBC.

to:

In 1967 1966, the Ford Foundation, having invested over $130 million into a network that was still dependent on their contributions and grants, started decided to consider pulling its funding, start withdrawing funding for the network, causing many affiliate stations to consider turning to the federal government for financial assistance. As a result, the government passed the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, creating the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a semi-private[[note]]Its board is appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.[[/note]] corporation to fund NET. While it did this for a few years, it soon became clear that NET's documentary programming had not only alienated many of its affiliates, but also angered UsefulNotes/RichardNixon, who saw NET's documentaries as nothing more than propaganda against his administration. As a result, the CPB created the Public Broadcasting Service in 1969 as a new entity to take over network operations, and in 1970 NET was dissolved and merged into WNDT in [[{{Joisey}} Newark, New Jersey]] (which became WNET), ending its existence as a formal network. NET's decentralized system was retained by PBS, largely because the existing commercial {{networks}} and conservatives in Congress did ''not'' want an American version of the BBC.
18th Aug '16 6:24:48 PM CJO123
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In 1967 the Ford Foundation, having invested over $130 million into a network that was still dependent on their contributions and grants, started to consider pulling its funding, causing many affiliate stations to consider turning to the federal government for financial assistance. As a result, the government passed the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, creating the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a semi-private[[note]]Its board is appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.[[/note]] corporation to fund NET. While it did this for a few years, it soon became clear that NET's documentary programming had not only alienated many of its affiliates, but also infuriated UsefulNotes/RichardNixon, who saw the documentaries as nothing more than propaganda against his administration. As a result, the CPB created the Public Broadcasting Service in 1969 as a new entity to take over network operations, and in 1970 NET was dissolved and merged into WNDT in [[{{Joisey}} Newark, New Jersey]] (which became WNET), ending its existence as a formal network. NET's decentralized system was retained by PBS, largely because the existing commercial {{networks}} and conservatives in Congress did ''not'' want an American version of the BBC.

to:

In 1967 the Ford Foundation, having invested over $130 million into a network that was still dependent on their contributions and grants, started to consider pulling its funding, causing many affiliate stations to consider turning to the federal government for financial assistance. As a result, the government passed the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, creating the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a semi-private[[note]]Its board is appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.[[/note]] corporation to fund NET. While it did this for a few years, it soon became clear that NET's documentary programming had not only alienated many of its affiliates, but also infuriated angered UsefulNotes/RichardNixon, who saw the NET's documentaries as nothing more than propaganda against his administration. As a result, the CPB created the Public Broadcasting Service in 1969 as a new entity to take over network operations, and in 1970 NET was dissolved and merged into WNDT in [[{{Joisey}} Newark, New Jersey]] (which became WNET), ending its existence as a formal network. NET's decentralized system was retained by PBS, largely because the existing commercial {{networks}} and conservatives in Congress did ''not'' want an American version of the BBC.
5th Jun '16 12:45:22 AM ryanasaurus0077
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Currently, they have branched out to the Internet, creating a well-received, informative WebVideo series on Website/YouTube, The WebVideo/PBSIdeaChannel. Other TV ventures include several diginets, including ''World'', offering PBS' current affairs library 24/7, ''V-Me'', focusing on Spanish-language programming, and ''Create'', focusing on DIY-type and cooking shows; these digi-nets are not operated by PBS, by by close ally American Public Television, which syndicates various programs to PBS stations.

to:

Currently, they have branched out to the Internet, creating a well-received, informative WebVideo series on Website/YouTube, The WebVideo/PBSIdeaChannel. Other TV ventures include several diginets, including ''World'', offering PBS' current affairs library 24/7, ''V-Me'', focusing on Spanish-language programming, and ''Create'', focusing on DIY-type and cooking shows; these digi-nets are not operated by PBS, by by close ally American Public Television, which syndicates various programs to PBS stations.
stations. PBS also has a home video division, Creator/PBSHomeVideo.
22nd Apr '16 1:47:23 PM MarkLungo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


->''I'm talking about hopes, dreams--the magic of television! Especially ''public'' television. Puppets can say what men cannot.''

to:

->''I'm ->''"I'm talking about hopes, dreams--the magic of television! Especially ''public'' television. Puppets can say what men cannot.''"''
11th Apr '16 3:36:16 AM C2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


!!Shows aired on PBS include:

to:

!!Shows aired on PBS stations [[note]]supplied either by the network or outside syndicators[[/note]] include:
6th Apr '16 10:15:57 PM ryanasaurus0077
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Of course, this page wouldn't be complete without a list of anime broadcast by certain affiliates, including, most prominently, KQEH San Jose. These include:

to:

Of course, this page wouldn't be complete without a list of anime broadcast by certain affiliates, including, most prominently, KQEH San Jose.KQED Plus. These include:



* ''Anime/BishojoSenshiSailorMoon''
* ''Manga/CorrectorYui''

to:

* ''Anime/BishojoSenshiSailorMoon''
''Manga/SailorMoon''
* ''Manga/CorrectorYui''''Anime/CorrectorYui''



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Robotech}}''

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Robotech}}''''Anime/{{Robotech}}''
31st Mar '16 7:38:40 PM lknmjh
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[note]]While the original series was seen on practically every PBS station, the new series is another issue. The BBC currently gives the US distribution rights first to BBC America, where they will hang on to the new episodes for about a year before handing it over to PBS. And even then, not all PBS stations still show the new episodes. As of this writing, the only stations that still show new episodes are: WTTW in Chicago, IL, WPT in Madison, WI, KLRU in Austin, TX, WETA in Washington D.C., and OETA in Oklahoma City, OK.[[/note]]

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[note]]While the original series was seen on practically every PBS station, the new series is another issue. The BBC currently gives the US distribution rights first to BBC America, where they will hang on to the new episodes for about a year before handing it over to PBS. And even then, not all PBS stations still show the new episodes. As of this writing, the only stations that still show new episodes are: WTTW in Chicago, IL, WPT in Madison, WI, KLRU in Austin, TX, WETA in Washington D.C., and OETA in Oklahoma City, OK.OK, and IPTV for the entire state of Iowa.[[/note]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 79. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.PBS