History Creator / NBC

11th Jul '16 12:42:28 PM fauxtoast
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In 2004, NBC finally merged with its' old partner, Creator/{{Universal}} Entertainment, forming [=NBCUniversal=]; As a result, GE now held 80% of the new company, with French conglomerate Vivendi (Universal's owner) holding the remaining piece (separately, Universal held onto Universal Music and Universal Interactive (which has since been absorbed into Creator/{{Activision}}). The companies had a close relationship since the 1960s, with Universal TV, its' predecessor Revue Studios, and its' temporary successor, Studios USA, making many of NBC's hit series. The merger also allowed NBC to expand its Olympics coverage across Universal's channels including USA Network, Sci-Fi, and UniversalHD.

to:

In 2004, NBC finally merged with its' old partner, Creator/{{Universal}} Entertainment, forming [=NBCUniversal=]; As a result, GE now held 80% of the new company, with French conglomerate Vivendi (Universal's owner) holding the remaining piece (separately, Universal held onto Universal Music and Universal Interactive (which has since been absorbed into Creator/{{Activision}}).Creator/{{Activision}})). The companies had a close relationship since the 1960s, with Universal TV, its' predecessor Revue Studios, and its' temporary successor, Studios USA, making many of NBC's hit series. The merger also allowed NBC to expand its Olympics coverage across Universal's channels including USA Network, Sci-Fi, and UniversalHD.
Universal HD.
11th Jul '16 12:41:29 PM fauxtoast
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Media pundits cried foul at NBC's decision, saying that it was a lose-lose situation, for both the network and television programmers: If ''Leno'' failed, the network had surrendered in a wasted effort a third of its UsefulNotes/PrimeTime lineup to its biggest flop since ''Series/{{Supertrain}}'', with the potential result having the network fold or be re-aligned as a cable channel. But, if ''Leno'' succeeded, then the other three major networks (all suffering with falling ratings and advertiser revenue) could follow NBC's lead, making even more cuts to scripted programming in favor of more {{reality show}}s. Feeling that a potential loss of NBC as a major network was preferable to what they saw as the corruption of the entire TV landscape, many in the industry actively cheered for ''Leno'' to fail. They got their wish a few months later in January, 2010, when the show's dwindling ratings, combined with fuming network affiliates (justifiably angry that ''Leno''[='s=] poor ratings were dragging down their nightly {{news broadcast}}s), pushed NBC to decide on a drastic step: the network announced they were going to take ''The Jay Leno Show'', cut it down to a half-hour, and move into the ''Tonight Show'''s slot at 11:35pm, and move ''The Tonight Show'' to 12:05am.

This then led to a public clash between NBC and current ''Tonight Show'' host Creator/ConanOBrien, who, after waiting nearly ''five years'' to take over the show after Leno retired (a deal struck with the network back in 2004), and after only having the show seven months, saw the move as a drastic change that broke a decades-long television tradition, as well as a move that shook his standing with the network, a vote of no confidence despite helming his ''Late Night'' successfully for NBC for over 14 years. O'Brien ultimately left NBC rather than make the move, eventually starting a new talk show on TBS. Leno returned to ''The Tonight Show'' in March 2010 (eventually retiring, for good, in 2014.) Between the network's overall ratings and the negative publicity with Conan & Leno, NBC ended the 2009-10 season in the worst shape it had been in since the 1979-80 season only a small handful of new shows (such as ''Series/{{Community}}'' and ''Series/{{Parenthood}}'') were renewed for a second season. Then, to make matters worse, the 2010 Winter Olympics proved to be a quarter-billion-dollar money pit not unlike that of 30 years earlier, with declining ratings not justifying its exorbitant cost.

to:

Media pundits cried foul at NBC's decision, saying that it was a lose-lose situation, for both the network and television programmers: If ''Leno'' failed, the network had surrendered in a wasted effort a third of its UsefulNotes/PrimeTime lineup to its biggest flop since ''Series/{{Supertrain}}'', with the potential result having leaving the network so weak financially it could potentially fold or be re-aligned as a cable channel. But, if ''Leno'' succeeded, then the other three major networks (all of them suffering with falling ratings and advertiser revenue) could follow NBC's lead, making and make even more cuts to scripted programming in favor of more cheaper-to-make {{reality show}}s.show}}s or in-house productions like ''Leno''. Feeling that a potential loss of NBC as a major network was preferable to what they saw as the corruption of the entire TV landscape, many in the industry actively cheered for ''Leno'' to fail. They got their wish a few months later in January, 2010, when the show's dwindling ratings, combined with fuming network affiliates (justifiably angry that ''Leno''[='s=] poor ratings were dragging down their nightly {{news broadcast}}s), pushed NBC to decide on a drastic step: the network announced they were going to take ''The Jay Leno Show'', cut it down to a half-hour, and move into the ''Tonight Show'''s slot at 11:35pm, and move ''The Tonight Show'' to 12:05am.

This then led to a public clash between NBC and current ''Tonight Show'' host Creator/ConanOBrien, who, after waiting nearly ''five years'' to take over the show after Leno retired (a deal struck with the network back in 2004), and after only having the show seven months, saw the move as a drastic change that broke a decades-long television tradition, as well as a move an insult that shook his standing with the network, a vote of no confidence despite helming his post-Letterman ''Late Night'' successfully for NBC for over 14 years. O'Brien ultimately left NBC rather than make the move, eventually starting a new talk show on TBS. Leno returned to ''The Tonight Show'' in March 2010 (eventually retiring, for good, in 2014.) Between the network's overall ratings and the negative publicity with Conan & Leno, NBC ended the 2009-10 season in the worst shape it had been in since the 1979-80 season only a small handful of new shows (such as ''Series/{{Community}}'' and ''Series/{{Parenthood}}'') were renewed for a second season. Then, to make matters worse, the 2010 Winter Olympics proved to be a quarter-billion-dollar money pit not unlike that of 30 years earlier, with declining ratings not justifying its exorbitant cost.
11th Jul '16 12:33:32 PM fauxtoast
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Meanwhile, in 2004, NBC finally merged with its' old partner, Creator/{{Universal}} Studios, forming [=NBCUniversal=]; as a result, GE now held 80% of the new company, with French conglomerate Vivendi holding the remaining piece (they also continued to own Universal Music, and Universal Interactive, which has since been absorbed into Creator/{{Activision}}. They had a close relationship since the 1960s, with Universal TV, its' predecessor Revue Studios, and its' temporary successor, Studios USA, making many of NBC's hit series. This allowed NBC a lot of channels to carry its' Olympics coverage, including USA, Sci-Fi, and Universal HD.

In 2009, in an effort to cut costs and get back on track, NBC made the controversial (and, in hindsight, [[WhatAnIdiot utterly stupid]]) decision of giving [[AdoredByTheNetwork Jay Leno]], recently retired from ''The Tonight Show'', a Monday-through-Friday, UsefulNotes/PrimeTime slot for a new VarietyShow, ''The Jay Leno Show'' [[note]](basically his ''TheTonightShow'' at 10:00 PM with a segment that copies one from [[TopGear a certain British automotive show]])[[/note]]. This was the first time that a network scheduled the same show five nights a week since TheFifties, and the [[InternetBackdraft response]] was both immediate and brutal. TV fans cried foul at NBC's decision, saying that it was a lose-lose situation for both the network and television in general. If ''Leno'' failed, the network would have to surrender a third of its UsefulNotes/PrimeTime lineup to its biggest flop since ''Series/{{Supertrain}}''... but if it succeeded, then the other networks (pressed by falling ratings and advertiser revenue) would follow NBC's lead, making even more cuts to scripted programming in favor of more {{reality show}}s. Feeling that the loss of only one network was preferable to what they saw as the corruption of the entire TV landscape, many people actively cheered for ''Leno'' to fail.

They got their wish the following January when the show's meager, shrinking ratings, combined with fuming network affiliates (justifiably angry that ''Leno''[='s=] poor ratings were dragging down their nightly {{news broadcast}}s), pushed NBC to decide to take ''The Jay Leno Show'', cut it down to a half-hour, and move it to the ''Tonight Show'' slot at 11:35. This led to a massive clash with ''Tonight Show'' host Creator/ConanOBrien, who resented after only having the show seven months (and having waited nearly ''five'' years for a per-arranged agreement with NBC for the opportunity to take over the show after Leno's retirement) to have it moved forward to 12:05am, changing the timeslot ''The Tonight Show'' had been in for decades --- a move that also wouldn't help Conan's own struggling ratings situation. O'Brien ultimately left NBC rather than move, eventually starting a new talk show on TBS, and so Leno returned to ''The Tonight Show'' in March 2010 (eventually retiring, for good, in 2014.) Between the network's ratings and the negative publicity with Conan & Leno, NBC ended the 2009-10 season in the worst shape it had been in since the 1979-80 season only a small handful of new shows (such as ''Series/{{Community}}'' and ''Series/{{Parenthood}}'') were renewed for a second season. Then, to make matters worse, the 2010 Winter Olympics proved to be a quarter-billion-dollar money pit not unlike that of 30 years earlier, with declining ratings not justifying its exorbitant cost.

to:

Meanwhile, in In 2004, NBC finally merged with its' old partner, Creator/{{Universal}} Studios, Entertainment, forming [=NBCUniversal=]; as As a result, GE now held 80% of the new company, with French conglomerate Vivendi (Universal's owner) holding the remaining piece (they also continued to own (separately, Universal Music, held onto Universal Music and Universal Interactive, which Interactive (which has since been absorbed into Creator/{{Activision}}. They Creator/{{Activision}}). The companies had a close relationship since the 1960s, with Universal TV, its' predecessor Revue Studios, and its' temporary successor, Studios USA, making many of NBC's hit series. This The merger also allowed NBC a lot of to expand its Olympics coverage across Universal's channels to carry its' Olympics coverage, including USA, USA Network, Sci-Fi, and Universal HD.

UniversalHD.

In September 2009, in an effort to cut costs and get back on track, costs, NBC made the controversial (and, in hindsight, [[WhatAnIdiot utterly stupid]]) decision of giving [[AdoredByTheNetwork Jay Leno]], recently retired from ''The Tonight Show'', a Monday-through-Friday, UsefulNotes/PrimeTime slot for a new VarietyShow, ''The Jay Leno Show'' [[note]](basically his ''TheTonightShow'' at 10:00 PM with a segment that copies one from [[TopGear a certain British automotive show]])[[/note]]. This was the first time that a network scheduled the same show five nights a week since TheFifties, and the [[InternetBackdraft response]] was both immediate and brutal. TV fans

Media pundits
cried foul at NBC's decision, saying that it was a lose-lose situation situation, for both the network and television in general. programmers: If ''Leno'' failed, the network would have to surrender had surrendered in a wasted effort a third of its UsefulNotes/PrimeTime lineup to its biggest flop since ''Series/{{Supertrain}}''... but ''Series/{{Supertrain}}'', with the potential result having the network fold or be re-aligned as a cable channel. But, if it ''Leno'' succeeded, then the other three major networks (pressed by (all suffering with falling ratings and advertiser revenue) would could follow NBC's lead, making even more cuts to scripted programming in favor of more {{reality show}}s. Feeling that the a potential loss of only one NBC as a major network was preferable to what they saw as the corruption of the entire TV landscape, many people in the industry actively cheered for ''Leno'' to fail.

fail. They got their wish the following January a few months later in January, 2010, when the show's meager, shrinking dwindling ratings, combined with fuming network affiliates (justifiably angry that ''Leno''[='s=] poor ratings were dragging down their nightly {{news broadcast}}s), pushed NBC to decide on a drastic step: the network announced they were going to take ''The Jay Leno Show'', cut it down to a half-hour, and move it to into the ''Tonight Show'''s slot at 11:35pm, and move ''The Tonight Show'' slot at 11:35. to 12:05am.

This then led to a massive public clash with between NBC and current ''Tonight Show'' host Creator/ConanOBrien, who resented who, after waiting nearly ''five years'' to take over the show after Leno retired (a deal struck with the network back in 2004), and after only having the show seven months (and having waited nearly ''five'' years for a per-arranged agreement with NBC for months, saw the opportunity to take over the show after Leno's retirement) to have it moved forward to 12:05am, changing the timeslot ''The Tonight Show'' had been in for decades --- move as a drastic change that broke a decades-long television tradition, as well as a move that also wouldn't help Conan's own struggling ratings situation. shook his standing with the network, a vote of no confidence despite helming his ''Late Night'' successfully for NBC for over 14 years. O'Brien ultimately left NBC rather than make the move, eventually starting a new talk show on TBS, and so TBS. Leno returned to ''The Tonight Show'' in March 2010 (eventually retiring, for good, in 2014.) Between the network's overall ratings and the negative publicity with Conan & Leno, NBC ended the 2009-10 season in the worst shape it had been in since the 1979-80 season only a small handful of new shows (such as ''Series/{{Community}}'' and ''Series/{{Parenthood}}'') were renewed for a second season. Then, to make matters worse, the 2010 Winter Olympics proved to be a quarter-billion-dollar money pit not unlike that of 30 years earlier, with declining ratings not justifying its exorbitant cost.
11th Jun '16 3:23:06 PM themisterfree
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* ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManAndHisAmaxingFriends''

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManAndHisAmaxingFriends''''WesternAnimation/SpiderManAndHisAmazingFriends''
11th Jun '16 3:21:19 PM themisterfree
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheAddamsFamily'' (The 1992 AnimatedAdaptation series)

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheAddamsFamily'' (The 1992 AnimatedAdaptation series)1973 AnimatedAdaptation)



* ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfTheGummiBears''



* ''Series/ChainReaction''



* ''Series/{{Concentration}}''

to:

* ''Series/{{Concentration}}''''Series/{{Concentration}}'' (Original run, 1958-75; ''Classic'', 1987-91 first-run, 1993 in reruns)



* ''[[Series/{{Gambit}} Las Vegas Gambit]]''



* ''Series/HighRollers'' (1974-76, then 1978-80)



* ''Series/LetsMakeADeal''

to:

* ''Series/LetsMakeADeal''''Series/LetsMakeADeal'' (1963-67; 2003)



** ''WebVideo/TheOfficeBlackmail"
** "WebVideo/TheOfficeKevin'sLoan"
** "WebVideo/TheOfficeSubtleSexuality"
** "WebVideo/TheOfficeThe3rdFloor"


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* ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManAndHisAmaxingFriends''
5th Jun '16 8:18:09 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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On New Year's Day, NBC temporarily (as in, for four years) retired the peacock logo that had been used for the past two decades [[note]](though in reality a logo called "The Snake" forming the letters NBC was the one to go; in the early age of the Peacock's usage, it was mainly used to advertise that a program was in color, and the transition from black-and-white to color broadcasting had been completed by 1976. So at the time, it was thought the Peacock wasn't needed to advertise color shows any longer, and NBC didn't think of it as their 'main brand' at the time like The Snake)[[/note]] in favor of a stylized capital N for its broadcast of the Tournament of Roses parade. Unfortunately, NBC "acquired" said logo by "borrowing" it from the [[OfferVoidInNebraska Nebraska Educational Television Network]] without bothering to ask or pay them. Nebraska ETV sued, and NBC settled, buying the logo for $1,000,000 in television equipment which Nebraska ETV had a lot more use for than their logo.

to:

On New Year's Day, NBC temporarily (as in, for four years) retired the peacock logo that had been used for the past two decades [[note]](though in reality a logo called "The Snake" forming the letters NBC was the one to go; in the early age of the Peacock's usage, it was mainly used to advertise that a program was in color, and the transition from black-and-white to color broadcasting had been completed by 1976. So at the time, it was thought the Peacock wasn't needed to advertise color shows any longer, and NBC didn't think of it as their 'main brand' at the time like The Snake)[[/note]] in favor of a stylized capital N for its broadcast of the Tournament of Roses parade. Unfortunately, NBC "acquired" said it happened to look almost identical to the logo then used by "borrowing" it from the [[OfferVoidInNebraska [[Creator/{{PBS}} Nebraska Educational Television Network]] without bothering to ask or pay them. Network]]. Nebraska ETV sued, and NBC settled, buying the logo for $1,000,000 in television equipment which Nebraska ETV had a lot more use for than their logo.
logo.

The kicker? NBC spent $1,000,000 on their new logo. Nebraska ETV spent ''$150!''
24th May '16 4:31:19 PM themisterfree
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* ''Series/{{Blockbusters}}'' (1980-82; revived in 1987)



* ''Series/CardSharks''



* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfZelda''


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* ''[[Series/{{Password}} Password Plus/Super Password]]''


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* ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury''


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* ''Series/WinLoseOrDraw'' (daytime version)
13th May '16 12:20:11 PM pepsimax
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Powerless|2016}}''
12th May '16 3:14:48 PM bombadil211
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* ''Series/ChicagoMed''
* ''Series/ChicagoPD''

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* ** ''Series/ChicagoJustice''
**
''Series/ChicagoMed''
* ** ''Series/ChicagoPD''
7th May '16 5:20:51 PM nombretomado
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After 2000, ratings on NBC started to slip across the board, and the glory days of the 1980s-90s gave way to years of seemingly intractable poor performance. The once-invincible Thursday night block faced stiff competition in the UsefulNotes/{{ratings}} by ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' on Creator/{{CBS}} and by ''GreysAnatomy'' on Creator/{{ABC}}, causing the network to slip into fourth place with ratings more like those on TheCW than the other three major networks.

to:

After 2000, ratings on NBC started to slip across the board, and the glory days of the 1980s-90s gave way to years of seemingly intractable poor performance. The once-invincible Thursday night block faced stiff competition in the UsefulNotes/{{ratings}} by ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' and ''Series/{{CSI}}'' on Creator/{{CBS}} and by ''GreysAnatomy'' ''Series/GreysAnatomy'' on Creator/{{ABC}}, causing the network to slip into fourth place with ratings more like those on TheCW than the other three major networks.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.NBC