History Creator / Funimation

8th Nov '17 8:49:16 PM JGC-97
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* ''[[LightNovel/MasouGakuenHXH Hybrid x Heart Magias Academy Ataraxia]]''

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* ''[[LightNovel/MasouGakuenHXH Hybrid x Heart Magias Academy Ataraxia]]''''LightNovel/HybridXHeartMagiasAcademyAtaraxia''
21st Oct '17 11:12:02 PM TheMountainKing
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* ''[[Anime/GhostInTheShell Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence]]'' [[note]]Aquired from Creator/MangaEntertainment[[/note]]
17th Aug '17 10:50:28 PM Thavidux1234
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12th Aug '17 7:32:03 PM gjjones
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Funimation, stylized as [=FUNimation=] until around 2014, (previously known as [=FUNimation=] Productions and [=FUNimation=] Entertainment) is an anime dubbing and distribution company currently based in Flower Mound, Texas (a suburb of the [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas[=/=]Fort Worth Metroplex]]). The company rose to prominence by acquiring the rights to the popular anime title ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', its predecessor series ''Manga/DragonBall'' and its sequel series ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' as a way to survive [[TheNineties the early 1990s]] minor recession. By 1999, they were able to get widespread television exposure via Creator/CartoonNetwork and the ''Dragon Ball'' phenomenon belatedly yet quickly grew in the United States as it had elsewhere (to the point that Funimation openly describes itself as "the house that ''Dragonball'' built". Two previous attempts by Funimation to release ''Dragon Ball'' to network television had previously been cancelled, before the series and the company found success on Cartoon Network. Over time, it's found success with other anime like the two ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' series and ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''.

to:

Funimation, stylized as [=FUNimation=] until around 2014, (previously previously known as [=FUNimation=] Productions and [=FUNimation=] Entertainment) Entertainment, is an anime dubbing and distribution company currently based in Flower Mound, Texas (a suburb of the [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas[=/=]Fort Worth Metroplex]]). The company rose to prominence by acquiring the rights to the popular anime title ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', its predecessor series ''Manga/DragonBall'' and its sequel series ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' as a way to survive [[TheNineties the early 1990s]] minor recession. By 1999, they were able to get widespread television exposure via Creator/CartoonNetwork and the ''Dragon Ball'' phenomenon belatedly yet quickly grew in the United States as it had elsewhere (to the point that Funimation openly describes itself as "the house that ''Dragonball'' built". Two previous attempts by Funimation to release ''Dragon Ball'' to network television had previously been cancelled, before the series and the company found success on Cartoon Network. Over time, it's found success with other anime like the two ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' series and ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''.
12th Aug '17 6:26:37 PM Lionheart0
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* ''[[LightNovel/MasouGakuenHXH Hybrid x Heart Magias Academy Ataraxia]]''
8th Aug '17 4:14:10 PM gjjones
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!!Tropes relating to Funimation:

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!!Tropes relating to Funimation:!!Funimation provide examples of:


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* {{Cancellation}}:
** ''Manga/CrayonShinChan'' was given a GagDub for ''Creator/AdultSwim's'' Anime Lineup. Only 78episodes of the dub were produced for Adult Swim.
** ''Manga/DetectiveConan'' was dubbed as part of ''Creator/AdultSwim's'' Anime Lineup. Only around 50 episodes were aired by Adult Swim before they cancelled the series due to low ratings. Funimation dubbed 130 episodes in total before ceasing production.
** ''Manga/SgtFrog'' was originally going to be dubbed and shopped to Children Networks by ''Creator/ADVFilms'' before they went out of business. Funimation dubbed the first 78 episodes but ceased production due to being unable to secure a TV broadcasting license on a major children’s network.
** ''Manga/{{Toriko}}'' only received dubs for the first 50 episodes and was then cancelled for unknown reasons.


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* CompletelyDifferentTitle: Does this for quite a few shows. For example, ''[[Manga/SetoNoHanayome The Inland Sea Bride]]'' became ''Manga/MyBrideIsAMermaid''.
* DevelopmentHell: ''Anime/MaiHime'' and ''Anime/MaiOtome'', both announced as rescued in [[https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2013-08-10/funimation-adds-cowboy-bebop-escaflowne-outlaw-star-more 2013]], ''still'' haven't seen the light of day.


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* DoingItForTheArt:
** One of the major reasons why some Los Angeles and New York based voice actors are willing to work with Funimation, being that it's located a right-to-work state, thus cheaper prices and generally a more open environment compared to Los Angeles and New York (one of the advantages is that you can actually directly call up the company doing the casting auditions and have your name put on a list. Then, on audition day you go there and take your shot in person). Heck, they even got [[Creator/ScottMcNeil a Canadian guy]] to work on a small role in ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist'' and in ''Anime/SamuraiSeven'', and recently ''Anime/OnePieceFilmStrongWorld''.
** For older licenses that get picked up and later have new sequels, Funimation is typically really good about bringing back the original voice actors to reprise their roles despite living outside of Texas. ''Anime/BayonettaBloodyFate'', ''Anime/BlazBlueAlterMemory'', ''Anime/CodeGeassAkitoTheExiled'', ''Anime/EurekaSevenAO'', ''VideoGame/{{Neptunia}}'', ''Anime/RebuildOfEvangelion'' and ''[[Manga/{{Trigun}} Trigun: Badland Rumbles]]'' all saw most, if not all, the cast reprising their roles.
** In rare cases for popular series like ''Manga/BlackLagoon'', ''[[Manga/{{Hellsing}} Hellsing Ultimate]]'' and ''Manga/TheVanishingOfNagatoYukiChan'', Funimation commissioned for the dubbing to be completed by the original companies [[note]]Creator/TheOceanGroup, Creator/BangZoomEntertainment, and Creator/NYAVPost respectively[[/note]] in order to keep the voice casts the same.


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* FanNickname: With the announcement of the [[http://www.crunchyroll.com/anime-news/2016/09/08/crunchyroll-and-funimation-partner-to-expand-access-to-anime Funimation and Crunchyroll business partnership]], many in the [=AniTwitter=] came up with names like "Funiroll," "Crunchymation," and "Crunchyroll and Funimation [[Manga/DragonballZ fusion dance]]" [[note]]The last nickname is mostly inaccurate, as it should be noted that this is a only a business partnership (or joint venture) where Crunchyroll and Funimation still operate separately, but providing wider services for their customers. This is a stark contrast to a business merger (or something known as mergers and acquisitions)[[/note]]


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* KeepCirculatingTheTapes: In 2016, Funimation's licenses to many of their Creator/{{Aniplex}} produced series [[note]]''LightNovel/{{Baccano}}'', ''Manga/BirdyTheMighty'', ''Anime/DarkerThanBlack'', ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist'', ''[[Manga/FullmetalAlchemist Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood]]'', and ''Manga/{{Sekirei}}''[[/note]] ended up expiring, resulting in many of their home videos going out of print. Funimation similarly lost all of their rights to the various ''Manga/LupinIII'' movies and specials they previously dubbed, with some of them now being distributed by Creator/DiscotekMedia. Not to mention a few of their old DVD distributions for Creator/4KidsEntertainment have also ceased production.


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* MoneyDearBoy: The reason why their best actors only appear to stick around at Funimation for a handful of years. The most popular actors in the dub of FullMetalAlchemist are all now in Los Angeles. Unfortunately, dubbing anime pays very little compared to other acting jobs, and most like to reach for union jobs instead of Funimation's non-union ones.


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* NetworkToTheRescue: Ever since striking a business deal with ''Website/{{Crunchyroll}}'', Funimation has focused a lot of their licensing efforts on securing the rights to popular series that had previously been [[NoExportForYou floating in limbo]] such as ''LightNovel/{{Gosick}}'' and ''Literature/{{Hyouka}}''. That's not to mention all of their license pickups from Distributors that had went belly-up listed on the main page.
* NoBudget: Mostly averted. Being one of the largest anime licensors in North America (besides Creator/VizMedia), when compared to Creator/SentaiFilmworks and especially Creator/MediaBlasters, they have more production capabilities and enough money to occasionally hire out of state actors (such as Creator/PatrickSeitz, Creator/ChristopherCoreySmith and Creator/CarrieSavage, L.A.-based voice actors who are frequent regular at Funimation), and/or on a few occasions, outsource their dubs to other anime companies (i.e. ''[[Manga/{{Hellsing}} Hellsing Ultimate]]'' (episodes 5-10), ''Manga/IkkiTousen'': ''Great Guardians'' and ''Xtreme Xecutor'' being dubbed by the UsefulNote/LosAngeles-based Creator/NewGenerationPictures[[note]]Largely due to the fact that many L.A.-based voice actors who work regularly with Funimation started their work at New Generation Pictures[[/note]]).
** Though their first dub, Dragon Ball Z, had a considerably low budget following Sabans and Funimations parting. They stopped using the Canadian actors and replaced them with people closer to their headquarters. However, they weren't able to get actual actors so they instead got college theater actors from nearby. By the time they began dubbing the Frieza saga, they only had 11 in house actors...
** Their movie theater distribution model has fallen into criticism regarding this. Movies such as ''Anime/YourName'' were given a very limited release and almost invisible marketing.
* NoExportForYou: Arguably the worst offender of this in Latin America. Unlike UK, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand which Funimation gives rights to local companies to distribute their titles, Latin America receives the worst treatment by Funimation, specially when simulcast rights are announced. Until the Crunchyroll and Funimation alliance, it was rumored that Funimation have rights for Latin America, however, its not the case for certain titles. However, there're other titles that are owned by Funimation for Latin America that people in that region can't watch for many years and, as of this day, can't figure which are.
** However, this was averted with the second season of ''Anime/AttackOnTitan''. It was revealed that Funimation owns the rights for that season for Latin America and English speaking regions and now its available on Crunchyroll.
* OldShame: There are several anime series Funimation licensed over the years they are not proud of. ''Manga/MamotteLollipop'' is one of them. Anime fans who've seen it tend to agree with them.
* OneOfUs: Many of the staff and voice actors who worked with Funimation are anime, video games, and comic book fans themselves. Some of them are [[Website/DeviantArt deviantARTists]] themselves like [[http://maioceaneyes.deviantart.com/ Micah Solusod]] and (formerly) Creator/AlexisTipton. The reason many of them can scream for hours on end in shonen shows is because guys like Creator/ChristopherSabat and Creator/JustinCook, two of the original employees, were in rock bands for years prior.


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%%* ProductionPosse
* PromotedFanboy: Many of the company's voice actors are anime fans themselves, and translation and subtitling staff are frequently former fansubbers.


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* ScheduleSlip:
** The home release of ''Evangelion 3.33: You Can (NOT) Redo'' had to be delayed for ''three years'' because Khara wasn't satisfied with their dub and they want to [[{{Irony}} redo]] the subs on their own. Hideki Anno can also be another reason, if you take into account his return into depression after having worked on it.
** Occasionally, a simulcast/broadcast-dub episode is late to be posted online due to production issues, but they're very good at notifying fans beforehand.
** The home video release of ''LightNovel/BenTo'' was initially set for a summer 2014 release but Funimation caught on to the fact that the censored version was being included instead of the uncensored version. As such the release date was moved from summer 2014 to early 2015.
** They originally started dubbing ''Manga/DGrayMan'' in 2009 until 2010. The dub for the second half of the 2006 series was delayed for ''six years'' due to licensing issues between Funimation and Dentsu.
** Due to releasing season 2 of ''Manga/HeavensLostProperty'' ahead of schedule[[note]]American licensors are not allowed to release home videos of their shows until a few months after all of the home video singles have been released in Japan[[/note]] any titles distributed by Kadokawa in Japan will be DVD-only until two years later when a separate Blu-ray release comes out.
** Funimation licensed both ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'' and ''Manga/ACertainScientificRailgun'' in 2010 but weren't able to get either series out on home video until 2012 since Geneon Universal ordered them to hold off on their release. Similar to the situation above the initial releases for both seasons of both shows was DVD-only since Geneon just released the Blu-rays in Japan around that time.


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* UnCanceled: The English dub of ''Manga/DGrayMan'' falls under this. Originally, Funimation only dubbed the first 51 episodes from 2009 to 2010, before axing the dub to licensing issues from Dentsu. The project was revived in 2016, when they licensed the 2nd half of the 2006 series (episodes 52-103), along with ''Hallow''.


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* WhatCouldHaveBeen: They almost released the non-anime ''WesternAnimation/{{Pelswick}}'' on DVD in 2004, but didn't due to the low fanbase of the show.
8th Aug '17 4:07:43 PM gjjones
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Funimation, initially stylized as [=FUNimation=], (previously known as [=FUNimation=] Productions and [=FUNimation=] Entertainment) is an anime dubbing and distribution company currently based in Flower Mound, Texas (a suburb of the [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas[=/=]Fort Worth Metroplex]]). The company rose to prominence by acquiring the rights to the popular anime title ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', its predecessor series ''Manga/DragonBall'' and its sequel series ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' as a way to survive [[TheNineties the early 1990s]] minor recession. By 1999, they were able to get widespread television exposure via Creator/CartoonNetwork and the ''Dragon Ball'' phenomenon belatedly yet quickly grew in the United States as it had elsewhere (to the point that Funimation openly describes itself as "the house that ''Dragonball'' built". Two previous attempts by Funimation to release ''Dragon Ball'' to network television had previously been cancelled, before the series and the company found success on Cartoon Network. Over time, it's found success with other anime like the two ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' series and ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''.

From the early 1990s to the 2000s, Funimation was a respectably sized anime distributor but not considered one of the "Big Three" - which (depending on who you ask) were Creator/ADVFilms, Creator/{{Geneon}}, and Creator/BandaiEntertainment. The North American anime distributors, unfortunately, then went through a classic boom and bust cycle (like the video game industry in 1983 and comic book industry in 1993). It started with peak expansion in 2004-2005, which soon led to over-expansion, followed by the crash of 2008. Each of the Big Three had invested heavily in these expansion efforts to buy up most of the new titles, so they were hit the hardest. Geneon shut down in September 2007, and for the next full year, each week brought news of a new shutdown or cancelled project. Bandai also dwindled away, given that its parent company in Japan basically gave up on the North American market after realizing that they could never hope to sell anime there at the same prices they did in Japan (and ultimately Bandai shut down American operations in 2012). ADV dwindled away to almost nothing but clung to life for a while, with the meager remnants later reorganizing into other companies. When the dust settled, by 2009 Funimation was left as the only truly large and functional major anime distributor in North America. It bought up titles from the closed companies at fire sale prices, and soon came to dominate the North American anime market: the saying became that other companies can only buy licenses that Funimation had passed on after deeming them not worth the investment. Circa the New Tens, the only other large distributors are (more or less) Creator/VizMedia (which is also a major manga distributor) and Creator/SentaiFilmworks (a successor company for the remnants of ADV), but they used to have a small fraction of the market share that Funimation enjoys. Yet Sentai and newcomer Creator/AniplexUSA have risen tremendously and Funi's own share of the market and titles have decreased significantly. Also, Creator/NozomiEntertainment, Creator/DiscotekMedia, and Website/{{Crunchyroll}} (starting in 2016, [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-07-01/crunchyroll-to-dub-release-anime-on-bd-dvd/.103876 due to actually starting to fund dubs in addition to home video releases]]) have also chipped away at [=FUNi's=] monopoly. However it's still the leading distributor of anime in the U.S.

to:

Funimation, initially stylized as [=FUNimation=], [=FUNimation=] until around 2014, (previously known as [=FUNimation=] Productions and [=FUNimation=] Entertainment) is an anime dubbing and distribution company currently based in Flower Mound, Texas (a suburb of the [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas[=/=]Fort Worth Metroplex]]). The company rose to prominence by acquiring the rights to the popular anime title ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', its predecessor series ''Manga/DragonBall'' and its sequel series ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' as a way to survive [[TheNineties the early 1990s]] minor recession. By 1999, they were able to get widespread television exposure via Creator/CartoonNetwork and the ''Dragon Ball'' phenomenon belatedly yet quickly grew in the United States as it had elsewhere (to the point that Funimation openly describes itself as "the house that ''Dragonball'' built". Two previous attempts by Funimation to release ''Dragon Ball'' to network television had previously been cancelled, before the series and the company found success on Cartoon Network. Over time, it's found success with other anime like the two ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' series and ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''.

From the early 1990s to the 2000s, Funimation was a respectably sized anime distributor but not considered one of the "Big Three" - which (depending on who you ask) were Creator/ADVFilms, Creator/{{Geneon}}, and Creator/BandaiEntertainment. The North American anime distributors, unfortunately, then went through a classic boom and bust cycle (like the video game industry in 1983 and comic book industry in 1993). It started with peak expansion in 2004-2005, which soon led to over-expansion, followed by the crash of 2008. Each of the Big Three had invested heavily in these expansion efforts to buy up most of the new titles, so they were hit the hardest. Geneon shut down in September 2007, and for the next full year, each week brought news of a new shutdown or cancelled project. Bandai also dwindled away, given that its parent company in Japan basically gave up on the North American market after realizing that they could never hope to sell anime there at the same prices they did in Japan (and ultimately Bandai shut down American operations in 2012). ADV dwindled away to almost nothing but clung to life for a while, with the meager remnants later reorganizing into other companies. When the dust settled, by 2009 Funimation was left as the only truly large and functional major anime distributor in North America. It bought up titles from the closed companies at fire sale prices, and soon came to dominate the North American anime market: the saying became that other companies can only buy licenses that Funimation had passed on after deeming them not worth the investment. Circa the New Tens, the only other large distributors are (more or less) Creator/VizMedia (which is also a major manga distributor) and Creator/SentaiFilmworks (a successor company for the remnants of ADV), but they used to have a small fraction of the market share that Funimation enjoys. Yet Sentai and newcomer Creator/AniplexUSA have risen tremendously and Funi's own share of the market and titles have decreased significantly. Also, Creator/NozomiEntertainment, Creator/DiscotekMedia, and Website/{{Crunchyroll}} (starting in 2016, [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-07-01/crunchyroll-to-dub-release-anime-on-bd-dvd/.103876 due to actually starting to fund dubs in addition to home video releases]]) have also chipped away at [=FUNi's=] Funimation's monopoly. However it's still the leading distributor of anime in the U.S.
8th Aug '17 4:06:29 PM gjjones
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Funimation, stylized as [=FUNimation=], (previously known as [=FUNimation=] Productions and [=FUNimation=] Entertainment) is an anime dubbing and distribution company currently based in Flower Mound, Texas (a suburb of the [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas[=/=]Fort Worth Metroplex]]). The company rose to prominence by acquiring the rights to the popular anime title ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', its predecessor series ''Manga/DragonBall'' and its sequel series ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' as a way to survive [[TheNineties the early 1990s]] minor recession. By 1999, they were able to get widespread television exposure via Creator/CartoonNetwork and the ''Dragon Ball'' phenomenon belatedly yet quickly grew in the United States as it had elsewhere (to the point that [=FUNimation=] openly describes itself as "the house that ''Dragonball'' built". Two previous attempts by [=FUNimation=] to release ''Dragon Ball'' to network television had previously been cancelled, before the series and the company found success on Cartoon Network. Over time, it's found success with other anime like the two ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' series and ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''.

From the early 1990s to the 2000s, [=FUNimation=] was a respectably sized anime distributor but not considered one of the "Big Three" - which (depending on who you ask) were Creator/ADVFilms, Creator/{{Geneon}}, and Creator/BandaiEntertainment. The North American anime distributors, unfortunately, then went through a classic boom and bust cycle (like the video game industry in 1983 and comic book industry in 1993). It started with peak expansion in 2004-2005, which soon led to over-expansion, followed by the crash of 2008. Each of the Big Three had invested heavily in these expansion efforts to buy up most of the new titles, so they were hit the hardest. Geneon shut down in September 2007, and for the next full year, each week brought news of a new shutdown or cancelled project. Bandai also dwindled away, given that its parent company in Japan basically gave up on the North American market after realizing that they could never hope to sell anime there at the same prices they did in Japan (and ultimately Bandai shut down American operations in 2012). ADV dwindled away to almost nothing but clung to life for a while, with the meager remnants later reorganizing into other companies. When the dust settled, by 2009 [=FUNimation=] was left as the only truly large and functional major anime distributor in North America. It bought up titles from the closed companies at fire sale prices, and soon came to dominate the North American anime market: the saying became that other companies can only buy licenses that [=FUNimation=] had passed on after deeming them not worth the investment. Circa the New Tens, the only other large distributors are (more or less) Creator/VizMedia (which is also a major manga distributor) and Creator/SentaiFilmworks (a successor company for the remnants of ADV), but they used to have a small fraction of the market share that [=FUNimation=] enjoys. Yet Sentai and newcomer Creator/AniplexUSA have risen tremendously and Funi's own share of the market and titles have decreased significantly. Also, Creator/NozomiEntertainment, Creator/DiscotekMedia, and Website/{{Crunchyroll}} (starting in 2016, [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-07-01/crunchyroll-to-dub-release-anime-on-bd-dvd/.103876 due to actually starting to fund dubs in addition to home video releases]]) have also chipped away at [=FUNi's=] monopoly. However it's still the leading distributor of anime in the U.S.

At the end of 2008, [=FUNimation=] went on a licensing binge called "New Show A-Go-Go!", during which they announced even more Creator/{{Geneon}} titles (such as ''Anime/SamuraiChamploo''), as well as new titles such as ''Manga/SoulEater'' and the ''Anime/RebuildOfEvangelion'' films.

to:

Funimation, initially stylized as [=FUNimation=], (previously known as [=FUNimation=] Productions and [=FUNimation=] Entertainment) is an anime dubbing and distribution company currently based in Flower Mound, Texas (a suburb of the [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas[=/=]Fort Worth Metroplex]]). The company rose to prominence by acquiring the rights to the popular anime title ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', its predecessor series ''Manga/DragonBall'' and its sequel series ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' as a way to survive [[TheNineties the early 1990s]] minor recession. By 1999, they were able to get widespread television exposure via Creator/CartoonNetwork and the ''Dragon Ball'' phenomenon belatedly yet quickly grew in the United States as it had elsewhere (to the point that [=FUNimation=] Funimation openly describes itself as "the house that ''Dragonball'' built". Two previous attempts by [=FUNimation=] Funimation to release ''Dragon Ball'' to network television had previously been cancelled, before the series and the company found success on Cartoon Network. Over time, it's found success with other anime like the two ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' series and ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''.

From the early 1990s to the 2000s, [=FUNimation=] Funimation was a respectably sized anime distributor but not considered one of the "Big Three" - which (depending on who you ask) were Creator/ADVFilms, Creator/{{Geneon}}, and Creator/BandaiEntertainment. The North American anime distributors, unfortunately, then went through a classic boom and bust cycle (like the video game industry in 1983 and comic book industry in 1993). It started with peak expansion in 2004-2005, which soon led to over-expansion, followed by the crash of 2008. Each of the Big Three had invested heavily in these expansion efforts to buy up most of the new titles, so they were hit the hardest. Geneon shut down in September 2007, and for the next full year, each week brought news of a new shutdown or cancelled project. Bandai also dwindled away, given that its parent company in Japan basically gave up on the North American market after realizing that they could never hope to sell anime there at the same prices they did in Japan (and ultimately Bandai shut down American operations in 2012). ADV dwindled away to almost nothing but clung to life for a while, with the meager remnants later reorganizing into other companies. When the dust settled, by 2009 [=FUNimation=] Funimation was left as the only truly large and functional major anime distributor in North America. It bought up titles from the closed companies at fire sale prices, and soon came to dominate the North American anime market: the saying became that other companies can only buy licenses that [=FUNimation=] Funimation had passed on after deeming them not worth the investment. Circa the New Tens, the only other large distributors are (more or less) Creator/VizMedia (which is also a major manga distributor) and Creator/SentaiFilmworks (a successor company for the remnants of ADV), but they used to have a small fraction of the market share that [=FUNimation=] Funimation enjoys. Yet Sentai and newcomer Creator/AniplexUSA have risen tremendously and Funi's own share of the market and titles have decreased significantly. Also, Creator/NozomiEntertainment, Creator/DiscotekMedia, and Website/{{Crunchyroll}} (starting in 2016, [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-07-01/crunchyroll-to-dub-release-anime-on-bd-dvd/.103876 due to actually starting to fund dubs in addition to home video releases]]) have also chipped away at [=FUNi's=] monopoly. However it's still the leading distributor of anime in the U.S.

At the end of 2008, [=FUNimation=] Funimation went on a licensing binge called "New Show A-Go-Go!", during which they announced even more Creator/{{Geneon}} titles (such as ''Anime/SamuraiChamploo''), as well as new titles such as ''Manga/SoulEater'' and the ''Anime/RebuildOfEvangelion'' films.



In the early years, [=FUNimation=] had a poor reputation amongst many anime fans. This was largely due to their only license at the time, ''Dragon Ball'', being heavily altered and censored. Today, the company is now held in ''very'' high regard for their excellent staff and being faithful to their properties. Part of their marketing strategy is that they actually listen to the fans and take their suggestions into account, which does work. ''Dragon Ball'' gradually became more faithful to the original and they have overall created a new standard in [[SuperlativeDubbing the proper English dubbing of anime]]. They graciously make most of their titles available in full on their website, with links to which DVD they're on so they may be purchased. They also ran their own digital cable channel, which was the only linear anime-exclusive, television network (before they ended their partnership with channel owner Olympusat, who subsequently retooled the channel as TOKU). This all happened amidst an economic recession that shrunk the dubbing industry, which results in gaining a higher percentage of anime statewide than other studios. Because of their insane amount of titles, and the somewhat limited budget for dubs, 95% of the time they have to use the same actors who live in the area, leading to severe RelationshipVoiceActor situations in all their shows, and who have gained growing popularity among fans.

[=FUNimation=] currently holds the rights for almost all Creator/{{GONZO}} properties[[note]] (exceptions: ''VideoGame/GateKeepers'' and ''Anime/GateKeepers21'' (Creator/{{Geneon}}); ''Anime/BlueSubmarineNo6'' (Creator/DiscotekMedia); ''Melty Lancer'', ''Franchise/SentouYouseiYukikaze'' (Creator/BandaiEntertainment); ''Anime/{{Gravion}}'', ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeSigma6'', ''Anime/FinalFantasyUnlimited'', ''Zaion I Wish You Were Here'', ''Manga/SpecialA'' (Creator/ADVFilms and its descendants); ''Manga/RealBoutHighSchool'' (Creator/{{Tokyopop}}), and others that remain unlicensed)[[/note]], and they have been releasing them in very appealing boxed sets with excellent production values and many extras (examples include their releases of ''Anime/AfroSamurai'' and ''Anime/SpeedGrapher''). They also have an imprint of sorts called ''The Viridian Collection'', which they have designed as a sort of Creator/CriterionCollection for high-profile anime releases, such as ''Anime/SamuraiSeven'', ''Manga/{{Basilisk}}'' and ''Manga/DesertPunk''. These releases are budget priced, so it's very easy to amass a relatively large collection of good anime without breaking your pockets. ''S.A.V.E. Edition'', where you can get a complete series for at most $30, takes this concept one step further. [=FUNimation=] is currently in talks to possibly re-license titles that Creator/BandaiEntertainment had before they ceased producing anything themselves, which could result in a mass acquisition very similar to GONZO.

Has done some interesting things regarding [=DVDs=], especially involving ''Dragon Ball'', such as starting a redubbed DVD series called the "Ultimate Uncut" Edition, only to abruptly drop that and subsequently announce new "Remastered" Season Box Sets of the entire series, cropped to widescreen. Naturally, many fans weren't impressed with the cropping, and the so-called Orange Boxes became the best selling anime boxsets on DVD by far. Due in part to purist backlash over the cropping in the Orange Boxes, [=FUNimation=] announced they had finally acquired the Super-High Quality Dragon Boxes from Japan, with the English dub remixed so that it retains the original background music, and Japanese voices selected by default for all those hardcore fans that didn't buy into the widescreen remasters. The Dragon Box releases are, as of 2015, out of print, [[CrackIsCheaper and now command the outrageous price of the blood of your first born child.]]

In October 2011, it was announced at New York Comic Con that [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2011-10-14/funimation-niconico-to-jointly-license-anime [=FUNimation=] and Nico Nico formed a joint partnership for streaming and home video releases]]. The partnership establishes a joint venture, known as "Funico", where Nico Nico handles the online streaming while [=FUNimation=] handles the home video distribution.

[=FUNimation=] also released ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' on DVD, in addition to a small selection of live-action films made or filmed in Japan.

to:

In the early years, [=FUNimation=] Funimation had a poor reputation amongst many anime fans. This was largely due to their only license at the time, ''Dragon Ball'', being heavily altered and censored. Today, the company is now held in ''very'' high regard for their excellent staff and being faithful to their properties. Part of their marketing strategy is that they actually listen to the fans and take their suggestions into account, which does work. ''Dragon Ball'' gradually became more faithful to the original and they have overall created a new standard in [[SuperlativeDubbing the proper English dubbing of anime]]. They graciously make most of their titles available in full on their website, with links to which DVD they're on so they may be purchased. They also ran their own digital cable channel, which was the only linear anime-exclusive, television network (before they ended their partnership with channel owner Olympusat, who subsequently retooled the channel as TOKU). This all happened amidst an economic recession that shrunk the dubbing industry, which results in gaining a higher percentage of anime statewide than other studios. Because of their insane amount of titles, and the somewhat limited budget for dubs, 95% of the time they have to use the same actors who live in the area, leading to severe RelationshipVoiceActor situations in all their shows, and who have gained growing popularity among fans.

[=FUNimation=] Funimation currently holds the rights for almost all Creator/{{GONZO}} properties[[note]] (exceptions: ''VideoGame/GateKeepers'' and ''Anime/GateKeepers21'' (Creator/{{Geneon}}); ''Anime/BlueSubmarineNo6'' (Creator/DiscotekMedia); ''Melty Lancer'', ''Franchise/SentouYouseiYukikaze'' (Creator/BandaiEntertainment); ''Anime/{{Gravion}}'', ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeSigma6'', ''Anime/FinalFantasyUnlimited'', ''Zaion I Wish You Were Here'', ''Manga/SpecialA'' (Creator/ADVFilms and its descendants); ''Manga/RealBoutHighSchool'' (Creator/{{Tokyopop}}), and others that remain unlicensed)[[/note]], and they have been releasing them in very appealing boxed sets with excellent production values and many extras (examples include their releases of ''Anime/AfroSamurai'' and ''Anime/SpeedGrapher''). They also have an imprint of sorts called ''The Viridian Collection'', which they have designed as a sort of Creator/CriterionCollection for high-profile anime releases, such as ''Anime/SamuraiSeven'', ''Manga/{{Basilisk}}'' and ''Manga/DesertPunk''. These releases are budget priced, so it's very easy to amass a relatively large collection of good anime without breaking your pockets. ''S.A.V.E. Edition'', where you can get a complete series for at most $30, takes this concept one step further. [=FUNimation=] Funimation is currently in talks to possibly re-license titles that Creator/BandaiEntertainment had before they ceased producing anything themselves, which could result in a mass acquisition very similar to GONZO.

Has done some interesting things regarding [=DVDs=], especially involving ''Dragon Ball'', such as starting a redubbed DVD series called the "Ultimate Uncut" Edition, only to abruptly drop that and subsequently announce new "Remastered" Season Box Sets of the entire series, cropped to widescreen. Naturally, many fans weren't impressed with the cropping, and the so-called Orange Boxes became the best selling anime boxsets on DVD by far. Due in part to purist backlash over the cropping in the Orange Boxes, [=FUNimation=] Funimation announced they had finally acquired the Super-High Quality Dragon Boxes from Japan, with the English dub remixed so that it retains the original background music, and Japanese voices selected by default for all those hardcore fans that didn't buy into the widescreen remasters. The Dragon Box releases are, as of 2015, out of print, [[CrackIsCheaper and now command the outrageous price of the blood of your first born child.]]

In October 2011, it was announced at New York Comic Con that [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2011-10-14/funimation-niconico-to-jointly-license-anime [=FUNimation=] Funimation and Nico Nico formed a joint partnership for streaming and home video releases]]. The partnership establishes a joint venture, known as "Funico", where Nico Nico handles the online streaming while [=FUNimation=] Funimation handles the home video distribution.

[=FUNimation=] Funimation also released ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' on DVD, in addition to a small selection of live-action films made or filmed in Japan.



On June 23rd, 2015, it was announced that [=FUNimation=] entered a multi year deal with [[Creator/{{Universal}} Universal Studios Home Entertainment]], in which it will manage the distribution of all [=FUNimation=] DVD and Blu-ray releases.

On September 9th, 2016, it was announced that [=FUNimation=] entered a deal with Website/{{Crunchyroll}}, [[http://www.funimation.com/blog/2016/09/08/funimation-crunchyroll-working-together-to-bring-you-more/ in which they will distribute some of Crunchyroll's licensed shows on home video, in addition to creating dubs for them, while Crunchyroll will show some of [=FUNimation=]'s simulcast shows in a sub-only format]].

to:

On June 23rd, 2015, it was announced that [=FUNimation=] Funimation entered a multi year deal with [[Creator/{{Universal}} Universal Studios Home Entertainment]], in which it will manage the distribution of all [=FUNimation=] Funimation DVD and Blu-ray releases.

On September 9th, 2016, it was announced that [=FUNimation=] Funimation entered a deal with Website/{{Crunchyroll}}, [[http://www.funimation.com/blog/2016/09/08/funimation-crunchyroll-working-together-to-bring-you-more/ in which they will distribute some of Crunchyroll's licensed shows on home video, in addition to creating dubs for them, while Crunchyroll will show some of [=FUNimation=]'s Funimation's simulcast shows in a sub-only format]].



For a list of [=FUNimation=] regulars, head to NamesToKnowInAnime\Dub Voice Actors\Texas\Primarily works in Dallas-Ft. Worth.

!Series licensed by [=FUNimation=] includes:

!!Series Localized by [=FUNimation=]

to:

For a list of [=FUNimation=] Funimation regulars, head to NamesToKnowInAnime\Dub Voice Actors\Texas\Primarily works in Dallas-Ft. Worth.

!Series licensed by [=FUNimation=] Funimation includes:

!!Series Localized by [=FUNimation=]Funimation



* ''Manga/BlackLagoon: OVA'' - "Roberta's Blood Trail" [[note]]Dub recorded by Creator/TheOceanGroup, rather than in house at [=FUNimation=][[/note]]

to:

* ''Manga/BlackLagoon: OVA'' - "Roberta's Blood Trail" [[note]]Dub recorded by Creator/TheOceanGroup, rather than in house at [=FUNimation=][[/note]]Funimation[[/note]]



* ''[[LightNovel/FullMetalPanic Full Metal Panic: The Second Raid]]'' [[note]]sort of. Kadokawa Pictures USA [now defunct] held the license itself and outsourced localization -- translation, subtitling, scripts, dubbing - to ADV in order to have consistency with the previous two series; [=FUNimation=] was in charge of packaging, DVD authoring, and distribution. Funi now hold this license outright, though[[/note]]

to:

* ''[[LightNovel/FullMetalPanic Full Metal Panic: The Second Raid]]'' [[note]]sort of. Kadokawa Pictures USA [now defunct] held the license itself and outsourced localization -- translation, subtitling, scripts, dubbing - to ADV in order to have consistency with the previous two series; [=FUNimation=] Funimation was in charge of packaging, DVD authoring, and distribution. Funi now hold this license outright, though[[/note]]



* ''Manga/{{Hellsing}} Ultimate'' [[note]]Dub recorded at Creator/NewGenerationPictures, rather than in-house at [=FUNimation=][[/note]]

to:

* ''Manga/{{Hellsing}} Ultimate'' [[note]]Dub recorded at Creator/NewGenerationPictures, rather than in-house at [=FUNimation=][[/note]]Funimation[[/note]]



* ''VideoGame/SakuraWars'' [[note]]Two [=OVAs=]:''Sakura Taisen: Sumire'' and ''Sakura Taisen: Ecole De Paris''. The latter based on ''Sakura Wars 3'') ([=FUNimation=] localized these themselves before rescuing the license to the movie[[/note]]

to:

* ''VideoGame/SakuraWars'' [[note]]Two [=OVAs=]:''Sakura Taisen: Sumire'' and ''Sakura Taisen: Ecole De Paris''. The latter based on ''Sakura Wars 3'') ([=FUNimation=] (Funimation localized these themselves before rescuing the license to the movie[[/note]]



* ''Manga/SgtFrog'' [[note]]Picked up from ADV Films in 2008, dubbed by [=FUNimation=] in-house as a GagDub[=/=]{{Woolseyism}}, currently on hiatus)[[/note]]

to:

* ''Manga/SgtFrog'' [[note]]Picked up from ADV Films in 2008, dubbed by [=FUNimation=] Funimation in-house as a GagDub[=/=]{{Woolseyism}}, currently on hiatus)[[/note]]



[[AC: Anime which Website/{{Crunchyroll}} holds the rights to, but [=FUNimation=] will provide English Dubs and/or Home Video Distributions for.]]

to:

[[AC: Anime which Website/{{Crunchyroll}} holds the rights to, but [=FUNimation=] Funimation will provide English Dubs and/or Home Video Distributions for.]]



* ''Anime/{{Free}}'' [[note]]First season only, [=FUNimation=] has second season's license; initially the sub was licensed to Creator/DiscotekMedia, dubbed version later had its own release[[/note]]

to:

* ''Anime/{{Free}}'' [[note]]First season only, [=FUNimation=] Funimation has second season's license; initially the sub was licensed to Creator/DiscotekMedia, dubbed version later had its own release[[/note]]



!!Tropes relating to [=FUNimation=]:

to:

!!Tropes relating to [=FUNimation=]:Funimation:
8th Aug '17 10:07:00 AM Omega3421
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Added DiffLines:

On July 31, 2017, Sony Pictures Television [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2017-07-31/sony-pictures-tv-to-acquire-majority-stake-in-funimation/.119575 announced plans to acquire a 95% stake in Funimation for $143 million while Gen Fukunaga will retain his position with a 5% share]]
27th Jul '17 10:29:52 PM Lionheart0
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Funimation, stylized as [=FUNimation=], (previously known as [=FUNimation=] Productions and [=FUNimation=] Entertainment) is an anime dubbing and distribution company currently based in Flower Mound, Texas (a suburb of the [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas[=/=]Fort Worth Metroplex]]). The company rose to prominence by acquiring the rights to the popular anime title ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', its predecessor series ''Manga/DragonBall'' and its sequel series ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' as a way to survive [[TheNineties the early 1990s]] minor recession. By 1999, they were able to get widespread television exposure via Creator/CartoonNetwork and the ''Dragon Ball'' phenomenon belatedly yet quickly grew in the United States as it had elsewhere (to the point that Funimation openly describes itself as "the house that ''Dragonball'' built". Two previous attempts by Funimation to release ''Dragon Ball'' to network television had previously been cancelled, before the series and the company found success on Cartoon Network. Over time, it's found success with other anime like the two ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' series and ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''.

From the early 1990s to the 2000s, Funimation was a respectably sized anime distributor but not considered one of the "Big Three" - which (depending on who you ask) were Creator/ADVFilms, Creator/{{Geneon}}, and Creator/BandaiEntertainment. The North American anime distributors, unfortunately, then went through a classic boom and bust cycle (like the video game industry in 1983 and comic book industry in 1993). It started with peak expansion in 2004-2005, which soon led to over-expansion, followed by the crash of 2008. Each of the Big Three had invested heavily in these expansion efforts to buy up most of the new titles, so they were hit the hardest. Geneon shut down in September 2007, and for the next full year, each week brought news of a new shutdown or cancelled project. Bandai also dwindled away, given that its parent company in Japan basically gave up on the North American market after realizing that they could never hope to sell anime there at the same prices they did in Japan (and ultimately Bandai shut down American operations in 2012). ADV dwindled away to almost nothing but clung to life for a while, with the meager remnants later reorganizing into other companies. When the dust settled, by 2009 Funimation was left as the only truly large and functional major anime distributor in North America. It bought up titles from the closed companies at fire sale prices, and soon came to dominate the North American anime market: the saying became that other companies can only buy licenses that [=FUNimation=] had passed on after deeming them not worth the investment. Circa the New Tens, the only other large distributors are (more or less) Creator/VizMedia (which is also a major manga distributor) and Creator/SentaiFilmworks (a successor company for the remnants of ADV), but they used to have a small fraction of the market share that Funimation enjoys. Yet Sentai and newcomer Creator/AniplexUSA have risen tremendously and Funi's own share of the market and titles have decreased significantly. Also, Creator/NozomiEntertainment, Creator/DiscotekMedia, and Website/{{Crunchyroll}} (starting in 2016, [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-07-01/crunchyroll-to-dub-release-anime-on-bd-dvd/.103876 due to actually starting to fund dubs in addition to home video releases]]) have also chipped away at [=FUNi's=] monopoly. However it's still the leading distributor of anime in the U.S.

At the end of 2008, Funimation went on a licensing binge called "New Show A-Go-Go!", during which they announced even more Creator/{{Geneon}} titles (such as ''Anime/SamuraiChamploo''), as well as new titles such as ''Manga/SoulEater'' and the ''Anime/RebuildOfEvangelion'' films.

to:

Funimation, stylized as [=FUNimation=], (previously known as [=FUNimation=] Productions and [=FUNimation=] Entertainment) is an anime dubbing and distribution company currently based in Flower Mound, Texas (a suburb of the [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas[=/=]Fort Worth Metroplex]]). The company rose to prominence by acquiring the rights to the popular anime title ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', its predecessor series ''Manga/DragonBall'' and its sequel series ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' as a way to survive [[TheNineties the early 1990s]] minor recession. By 1999, they were able to get widespread television exposure via Creator/CartoonNetwork and the ''Dragon Ball'' phenomenon belatedly yet quickly grew in the United States as it had elsewhere (to the point that Funimation [=FUNimation=] openly describes itself as "the house that ''Dragonball'' built". Two previous attempts by Funimation [=FUNimation=] to release ''Dragon Ball'' to network television had previously been cancelled, before the series and the company found success on Cartoon Network. Over time, it's found success with other anime like the two ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' series and ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''.

From the early 1990s to the 2000s, Funimation [=FUNimation=] was a respectably sized anime distributor but not considered one of the "Big Three" - which (depending on who you ask) were Creator/ADVFilms, Creator/{{Geneon}}, and Creator/BandaiEntertainment. The North American anime distributors, unfortunately, then went through a classic boom and bust cycle (like the video game industry in 1983 and comic book industry in 1993). It started with peak expansion in 2004-2005, which soon led to over-expansion, followed by the crash of 2008. Each of the Big Three had invested heavily in these expansion efforts to buy up most of the new titles, so they were hit the hardest. Geneon shut down in September 2007, and for the next full year, each week brought news of a new shutdown or cancelled project. Bandai also dwindled away, given that its parent company in Japan basically gave up on the North American market after realizing that they could never hope to sell anime there at the same prices they did in Japan (and ultimately Bandai shut down American operations in 2012). ADV dwindled away to almost nothing but clung to life for a while, with the meager remnants later reorganizing into other companies. When the dust settled, by 2009 Funimation [=FUNimation=] was left as the only truly large and functional major anime distributor in North America. It bought up titles from the closed companies at fire sale prices, and soon came to dominate the North American anime market: the saying became that other companies can only buy licenses that [=FUNimation=] had passed on after deeming them not worth the investment. Circa the New Tens, the only other large distributors are (more or less) Creator/VizMedia (which is also a major manga distributor) and Creator/SentaiFilmworks (a successor company for the remnants of ADV), but they used to have a small fraction of the market share that Funimation [=FUNimation=] enjoys. Yet Sentai and newcomer Creator/AniplexUSA have risen tremendously and Funi's own share of the market and titles have decreased significantly. Also, Creator/NozomiEntertainment, Creator/DiscotekMedia, and Website/{{Crunchyroll}} (starting in 2016, [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-07-01/crunchyroll-to-dub-release-anime-on-bd-dvd/.103876 due to actually starting to fund dubs in addition to home video releases]]) have also chipped away at [=FUNi's=] monopoly. However it's still the leading distributor of anime in the U.S.

At the end of 2008, Funimation [=FUNimation=] went on a licensing binge called "New Show A-Go-Go!", during which they announced even more Creator/{{Geneon}} titles (such as ''Anime/SamuraiChamploo''), as well as new titles such as ''Manga/SoulEater'' and the ''Anime/RebuildOfEvangelion'' films.



In the early years, Funimation had a poor reputation amongst many anime fans. This was largely due to their only license at the time, ''Dragon Ball'', being heavily altered and censored. Today, the company is now held in ''very'' high regard for their excellent staff and being faithful to their properties. Part of their marketing strategy is that they actually listen to the fans and take their suggestions into account, which does work. ''Dragon Ball'' gradually became more faithful to the original and they have overall created a new standard in [[SuperlativeDubbing the proper English dubbing of anime]]. They graciously make most of their titles available in full on their website, with links to which DVD they're on so they may be purchased. They also ran their own digital cable channel, which was the only linear anime-exclusive, television network (before they ended their partnership with channel owner Olympusat, who subsequently retooled the channel as TOKU). This all happened amidst an economic recession that shrunk the dubbing industry, which results in gaining a higher percentage of anime statewide than other studios. Because of their insane amount of titles, and the somewhat limited budget for dubs, 95% of the time they have to use the same actors who live in the area, leading to severe RelationshipVoiceActor situations in all their shows, and who have gained growing popularity among fans.

Funimation currently holds the rights for almost all Creator/{{GONZO}} properties[[note]] (exceptions: ''VideoGame/GateKeepers'' and ''Anime/GateKeepers21'' (Creator/{{Geneon}}); ''Anime/BlueSubmarineNo6'' (Creator/DiscotekMedia); ''Melty Lancer'', ''Franchise/SentouYouseiYukikaze'' (Creator/BandaiEntertainment); ''Anime/{{Gravion}}'', ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeSigma6'', ''Anime/FinalFantasyUnlimited'', ''Zaion I Wish You Were Here'', ''Manga/SpecialA'' (Creator/ADVFilms and its descendants); ''Manga/RealBoutHighSchool'' (Creator/{{Tokyopop}}), and others that remain unlicensed)[[/note]], and they have been releasing them in very appealing boxed sets with excellent production values and many extras (examples include their releases of ''Anime/AfroSamurai'' and ''Anime/SpeedGrapher''). They also have an imprint of sorts called ''The Viridian Collection'', which they have designed as a sort of Creator/CriterionCollection for high-profile anime releases, such as ''Anime/SamuraiSeven'', ''Manga/{{Basilisk}}'' and ''Manga/DesertPunk''. These releases are budget priced, so it's very easy to amass a relatively large collection of good anime without breaking your pockets. ''S.A.V.E. Edition'', where you can get a complete series for at most $30, takes this concept one step further. Funimation is currently in talks to possibly re-license titles that Creator/BandaiEntertainment had before they ceased producing anything themselves, which could result in a mass acquisition very similar to GONZO.

Has done some interesting things regarding [=DVDs=], especially involving ''Dragon Ball'', such as starting a redubbed DVD series called the "Ultimate Uncut" Edition, only to abruptly drop that and subsequently announce new "Remastered" Season Box Sets of the entire series, cropped to widescreen. Naturally, many fans weren't impressed with the cropping, and the so-called Orange Boxes became the best selling anime boxsets on DVD by far. Due in part to purist backlash over the cropping in the Orange Boxes, Funimation announced they had finally acquired the Super-High Quality Dragon Boxes from Japan, with the English dub remixed so that it retains the original background music, and Japanese voices selected by default for all those hardcore fans that didn't buy into the widescreen remasters. The Dragon Box releases are, as of 2015, out of print, [[CrackIsCheaper and now command the outrageous price of the blood of your first born child.]]

In October 2011, it was announced at New York Comic Con that [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2011-10-14/funimation-niconico-to-jointly-license-anime Funimation and Nico Nico formed a joint partnership for streaming and home video releases]]. The partnership establishes a joint venture, known as "Funico", where Nico Nico handles the online streaming while Funimation handles the home video distribution.

Funimation also released ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' on DVD, in addition to a small selection of live-action films made or filmed in Japan.

to:

In the early years, Funimation [=FUNimation=] had a poor reputation amongst many anime fans. This was largely due to their only license at the time, ''Dragon Ball'', being heavily altered and censored. Today, the company is now held in ''very'' high regard for their excellent staff and being faithful to their properties. Part of their marketing strategy is that they actually listen to the fans and take their suggestions into account, which does work. ''Dragon Ball'' gradually became more faithful to the original and they have overall created a new standard in [[SuperlativeDubbing the proper English dubbing of anime]]. They graciously make most of their titles available in full on their website, with links to which DVD they're on so they may be purchased. They also ran their own digital cable channel, which was the only linear anime-exclusive, television network (before they ended their partnership with channel owner Olympusat, who subsequently retooled the channel as TOKU). This all happened amidst an economic recession that shrunk the dubbing industry, which results in gaining a higher percentage of anime statewide than other studios. Because of their insane amount of titles, and the somewhat limited budget for dubs, 95% of the time they have to use the same actors who live in the area, leading to severe RelationshipVoiceActor situations in all their shows, and who have gained growing popularity among fans.

Funimation [=FUNimation=] currently holds the rights for almost all Creator/{{GONZO}} properties[[note]] (exceptions: ''VideoGame/GateKeepers'' and ''Anime/GateKeepers21'' (Creator/{{Geneon}}); ''Anime/BlueSubmarineNo6'' (Creator/DiscotekMedia); ''Melty Lancer'', ''Franchise/SentouYouseiYukikaze'' (Creator/BandaiEntertainment); ''Anime/{{Gravion}}'', ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeSigma6'', ''Anime/FinalFantasyUnlimited'', ''Zaion I Wish You Were Here'', ''Manga/SpecialA'' (Creator/ADVFilms and its descendants); ''Manga/RealBoutHighSchool'' (Creator/{{Tokyopop}}), and others that remain unlicensed)[[/note]], and they have been releasing them in very appealing boxed sets with excellent production values and many extras (examples include their releases of ''Anime/AfroSamurai'' and ''Anime/SpeedGrapher''). They also have an imprint of sorts called ''The Viridian Collection'', which they have designed as a sort of Creator/CriterionCollection for high-profile anime releases, such as ''Anime/SamuraiSeven'', ''Manga/{{Basilisk}}'' and ''Manga/DesertPunk''. These releases are budget priced, so it's very easy to amass a relatively large collection of good anime without breaking your pockets. ''S.A.V.E. Edition'', where you can get a complete series for at most $30, takes this concept one step further. Funimation [=FUNimation=] is currently in talks to possibly re-license titles that Creator/BandaiEntertainment had before they ceased producing anything themselves, which could result in a mass acquisition very similar to GONZO.

Has done some interesting things regarding [=DVDs=], especially involving ''Dragon Ball'', such as starting a redubbed DVD series called the "Ultimate Uncut" Edition, only to abruptly drop that and subsequently announce new "Remastered" Season Box Sets of the entire series, cropped to widescreen. Naturally, many fans weren't impressed with the cropping, and the so-called Orange Boxes became the best selling anime boxsets on DVD by far. Due in part to purist backlash over the cropping in the Orange Boxes, Funimation [=FUNimation=] announced they had finally acquired the Super-High Quality Dragon Boxes from Japan, with the English dub remixed so that it retains the original background music, and Japanese voices selected by default for all those hardcore fans that didn't buy into the widescreen remasters. The Dragon Box releases are, as of 2015, out of print, [[CrackIsCheaper and now command the outrageous price of the blood of your first born child.]]

In October 2011, it was announced at New York Comic Con that [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2011-10-14/funimation-niconico-to-jointly-license-anime Funimation [=FUNimation=] and Nico Nico formed a joint partnership for streaming and home video releases]]. The partnership establishes a joint venture, known as "Funico", where Nico Nico handles the online streaming while Funimation [=FUNimation=] handles the home video distribution.

Funimation [=FUNimation=] also released ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' on DVD, in addition to a small selection of live-action films made or filmed in Japan.



On June 23rd, 2015, it was announced that Funimation entered a multi year deal with [[Creator/{{Universal}} Universal Studios Home Entertainment]], in which it will manage the distribution of all Funimation DVD and Blu-ray releases.

On September 9th, 2016, it was announced that Funimation entered a deal with Website/{{Crunchyroll}}, [[http://www.funimation.com/blog/2016/09/08/funimation-crunchyroll-working-together-to-bring-you-more/ in which they will distribute some of Crunchyroll's licensed shows on home video, in addition to creating dubs for them, while Crunchyroll will show some of Funimation's simulcast shows in a sub-only format]].

For a list of Funimation regulars, head to NamesToKnowInAnime\Dub Voice Actors\Texas\Primarily works in Dallas-Ft. Worth.

!Series licensed by Funimation includes:

!!Series Localized by Funimation

to:

On June 23rd, 2015, it was announced that Funimation [=FUNimation=] entered a multi year deal with [[Creator/{{Universal}} Universal Studios Home Entertainment]], in which it will manage the distribution of all Funimation [=FUNimation=] DVD and Blu-ray releases.

On September 9th, 2016, it was announced that Funimation [=FUNimation=] entered a deal with Website/{{Crunchyroll}}, [[http://www.funimation.com/blog/2016/09/08/funimation-crunchyroll-working-together-to-bring-you-more/ in which they will distribute some of Crunchyroll's licensed shows on home video, in addition to creating dubs for them, while Crunchyroll will show some of Funimation's [=FUNimation=]'s simulcast shows in a sub-only format]].

For a list of Funimation [=FUNimation=] regulars, head to NamesToKnowInAnime\Dub Voice Actors\Texas\Primarily works in Dallas-Ft. Worth.

!Series licensed by Funimation [=FUNimation=] includes:

!!Series Localized by Funimation[=FUNimation=]



!!Sub-Licensed from Crunchyroll
[[AC: Anime which was sub-licensed from Website/{{Crunchyroll}}, in which Funimation will provide English Dubs and/or Home Video Distributions for.]]

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!!Sub-Licensed !!Series sub-licensed from Crunchyroll
[[AC: Anime which was sub-licensed from Website/{{Crunchyroll}}, in which Funimation Website/{{Crunchyroll}} holds the rights to, but [=FUNimation=] will provide English Dubs and/or Home Video Distributions for.]]



* ''Anime/{{Free}}'' [[note]]First season only, Funimation has second season's license; initially the sub was licensed to Creator/DiscotekMedia, dubbed version later had its own release[[/note]]

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* ''Anime/{{Free}}'' [[note]]First season only, Funimation [=FUNimation=] has second season's license; initially the sub was licensed to Creator/DiscotekMedia, dubbed version later had its own release[[/note]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.Funimation