History Creator / DCComics

19th Jun '16 10:27:40 PM pepsimax
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* Franchise/ArrowVerse (''Series/Arrow'' and related shows)

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* Franchise/ArrowVerse (''Series/Arrow'' (''Series/{{Arrow}}'' and related shows)


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* Creator/YoungAnimal
17th Jun '16 6:38:49 AM colabomb
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**Not to mention they retconned the Second Reboot (The New 52) with a soft reboot (Rebirth), indicating that the New 52 was not a separate universe, but rather the Post Crisis Universe Altered by an outside actor. The "New" Batman/Superman etc. simply have altered histories but are the same people substantially.
30th May '16 12:27:13 PM jake38
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DC's supernatural paradigm has changed considerably. In the 1990s, with the growing influence of the ComicBook/SwampThing and the beginning of the Kali Yuga storyline, DC left behind the Cosmic Good versus Cosmic Evil convention once common in superhero stories. Instead, according to current DC metaphysics, the cosmic battle involves LawfulNeutral (angels, Lords of Order) versus ChaoticNeutral (demons, Lords of Chaos), with both sides fairly indifferent to human perspectives about good or evil. (The only except to this seems to be the DC version of God, who is Good rather than Lawful, and the Devil, who varies according to the writer.) This cosmic disinterest in good/evil issues has been a major motivation for ComicBook/ThePhantomStranger and Deadman in their choices to side with humans instead of TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness of the week.

to:

DC's supernatural paradigm has changed considerably. In the 1990s, with the growing influence of the ComicBook/SwampThing and the beginning of the Kali Yuga storyline, DC left behind the Cosmic Good versus Cosmic Evil convention once common in superhero stories. Instead, according to current DC metaphysics, the cosmic battle involves LawfulNeutral (angels, Lords of Order) versus ChaoticNeutral (demons, Lords of Chaos), with both sides fairly indifferent to human perspectives about good or evil. (The only except exception to this seems to be the DC version of God, who is Good rather than Lawful, and the Devil, who varies according to the writer.) This cosmic disinterest in good/evil issues has been a major motivation for ComicBook/ThePhantomStranger and Deadman in their choices to side with humans instead of TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness of the week.
17th May '16 11:45:46 AM pepsimax
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[[caption-width-right:200:[-DC's logo as of ComicBook/DCRebirth. [[ImageLinks/DCComics Click here to see their old logos]].-] ]]

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[[caption-width-right:200:[-DC's logo as of ComicBook/DCRebirth. [[ImageLinks/DCComics [[note]][[ImageLinks/DCComics Click here to see their old logos]].-] -][[/note]] ]]
17th May '16 11:43:52 AM pepsimax
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[[quoteright:199:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dc-logo-272x350_294.png]]
[[caption-width-right:199:[-DC's logo as of the ComicBook/{{New 52}}. [[ImageLinks/DCComics Click here to see their old logos]].-] ]]

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[[quoteright:199:http://static.[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dc-logo-272x350_294.png]]
[[caption-width-right:199:[-DC's
org/pmwiki/pub/images/new_dc_logo.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:200:[-DC's
logo as of the ComicBook/{{New 52}}.ComicBook/DCRebirth. [[ImageLinks/DCComics Click here to see their old logos]].-] ]]
6th May '16 9:26:31 PM DetectiveRarity
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* VideoGame/BatmanArkhamSeries (VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum and sequels)
17th Apr '16 12:00:59 PM BlackSunNocturne
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* DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment: DC stands for "Detective Comics". So the company's current name iteration in full is "Detective Comics Comics".
12th Mar '16 3:43:52 PM Mario1995
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In the mid-1950s, DC revived their old superhero, Franchise/TheFlash, in order to appear in their anthology ''Showcase''. Rather than bringing back the old character, the writers introduced a new hero with a new secret identity and a scifi-based origin. Following the success of this story, the Franchise/GreenLantern was similarly reimagined, and National began increasing their superhero output. This practise was copied by several other publishers, most notably Marvel, who actually managed to exceed DC's sales and popularity in the 60s due to stronger writing. In 1967, DC managed to get some of this popularity by bringing Creator/SteveDitko over from Marvel, who introduced elements such as [[{{Antihero}} flawed heroes]] and personality clashes during team-up stories. Around the same time, Kinney National Company (who would become the parent of film studio Creator/WarnerBrothers) purchased DC Comics, integrating it as a division of Warner Bros. in the process. In the 70s, DC began to expand into more mature stories, attracting teenagers and young adults who previously considered comics to be exclusively a kids' medium.

to:

In the mid-1950s, DC revived their old superhero, Franchise/TheFlash, in order to appear in their anthology ''Showcase''. Rather than bringing back the old character, the writers introduced a new hero with a new secret identity and a scifi-based origin. Following the success of this story, the Franchise/GreenLantern was similarly reimagined, and National began increasing their superhero output. This practise was copied by several other publishers, most notably Marvel, who actually managed to exceed DC's sales and popularity in the 60s due to stronger writing. In 1967, DC managed to get some of this popularity by bringing Creator/SteveDitko over from Marvel, who introduced elements such as [[{{Antihero}} flawed heroes]] and personality clashes during team-up stories. Around the same time, the conglomerate Kinney National Company (who would become the parent of film studio Creator/WarnerBrothers) Creator/WarnerBrothers shortly after) purchased DC Comics, integrating it as a division of Warner Bros. in the process. In the 70s, DC began to expand into more mature stories, attracting teenagers and young adults who previously considered comics to be exclusively a kids' medium.
12th Mar '16 3:42:42 PM Mario1995
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In the mid-1950s, DC revived their old superhero, Franchise/TheFlash, in order to appear in their anthology ''Showcase''. Rather than bringing back the old character, the writers introduced a new hero with a new secret identity and a scifi-based origin. Following the success of this story, the Franchise/GreenLantern was similarly reimagined, and National began increasing their superhero output. This practise was copied by several other publishers, most notably Marvel, who actually managed to exceed DC's sales and popularity in the 60s due to stronger writing. In 1967, DC managed to get some of this popularity by bringing Creator/SteveDitko over from Marvel, who introduced elements such as [[{{Antihero}} flawed heroes]] and personality clashes during team-up stories. In the 70s, DC began to expand into more mature stories, attracting teenagers and young adults who previously considered comics to be exclusively a kids' medium.

to:

In the mid-1950s, DC revived their old superhero, Franchise/TheFlash, in order to appear in their anthology ''Showcase''. Rather than bringing back the old character, the writers introduced a new hero with a new secret identity and a scifi-based origin. Following the success of this story, the Franchise/GreenLantern was similarly reimagined, and National began increasing their superhero output. This practise was copied by several other publishers, most notably Marvel, who actually managed to exceed DC's sales and popularity in the 60s due to stronger writing. In 1967, DC managed to get some of this popularity by bringing Creator/SteveDitko over from Marvel, who introduced elements such as [[{{Antihero}} flawed heroes]] and personality clashes during team-up stories. Around the same time, Kinney National Company (who would become the parent of film studio Creator/WarnerBrothers) purchased DC Comics, integrating it as a division of Warner Bros. in the process. In the 70s, DC began to expand into more mature stories, attracting teenagers and young adults who previously considered comics to be exclusively a kids' medium.
28th Dec '15 8:08:27 AM Anddrix
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DC's supernatural paradigm has changed considerably. In the 1990s, with the growing influence of the ComicBook/SwampThing and the beginning of the Kali Yuga storyline, DC left behind the Cosmic Good versus Cosmic Evil convention once common in superhero stories. Instead, according to current DC metaphysics, the cosmic battle involves LawfulNeutral (angels, Lords of Order) versus ChaoticNeutral (demons, Lords of Chaos), with both sides fairly indifferent to human perspectives about good or evil. (The only except to this seems to be the DC version of God, who is Good rather than Lawful, and the Devil, who varies according to the writer.) This cosmic disinterest in good/evil issues has been a major motivation for ComicBook/ThePhantomStranger and Comicbook/{{Deadman}} in their choices to side with humans instead of TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness of the week.

to:

DC's supernatural paradigm has changed considerably. In the 1990s, with the growing influence of the ComicBook/SwampThing and the beginning of the Kali Yuga storyline, DC left behind the Cosmic Good versus Cosmic Evil convention once common in superhero stories. Instead, according to current DC metaphysics, the cosmic battle involves LawfulNeutral (angels, Lords of Order) versus ChaoticNeutral (demons, Lords of Chaos), with both sides fairly indifferent to human perspectives about good or evil. (The only except to this seems to be the DC version of God, who is Good rather than Lawful, and the Devil, who varies according to the writer.) This cosmic disinterest in good/evil issues has been a major motivation for ComicBook/ThePhantomStranger and Comicbook/{{Deadman}} Deadman in their choices to side with humans instead of TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness of the week.
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