History Creator / CharlesDickens

14th Dec '16 3:25:08 PM Xtifr
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'''Charles John Huffham Dickens''' (February 7, 1812 -- June 9, 1870) was the foremost English novelist of the 19th century, and is to this day one of the most famous authors in the English language.

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'''Charles Charles John Huffham Dickens''' Dickens (February 7, 1812 -- June 9, 1870) was the foremost English novelist of the 19th century, and is to this day one of the most famous authors in the English language.
24th Oct '16 2:08:42 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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Many of his works were first published as multi-part serials, complete with cliffhangers. A typical 'Dickensian' scenario features hordes of memorable -- often CatchPhrase-spouting -- characters tumbling through even more outrageously contrived plots. They would be delivered to the subscribing public in small bound monthly installments of three or four chapters at a time (rather like the modern comic-book industry) over the course of two or three years. Nowadays, the instalments generally mark chapter breaks in the larger novel.

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Many of his works were first published as multi-part serials, complete with cliffhangers. A typical 'Dickensian' scenario features hordes of memorable -- often CatchPhrase-spouting -- characters tumbling through even more outrageously contrived plots. They would be delivered to the subscribing public in small bound monthly installments of three or four chapters at a time (rather like the modern comic-book industry) over the course of two or three years. Nowadays, the instalments installments generally mark chapter breaks in the larger novel.
24th Oct '16 2:08:08 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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Many of his works were first published as multi-part serials, complete with cliffhangers. A typical 'Dickensian' scenario features hordes of memorable -- often CatchPhrase-spouting -- characters tumbling through even more outrageously contrived plots. They would be delivered to the subscribing public in small bound monthly instalments of three or four chapters at a time (rather like the modern comic-book industry) over the course of two or three years. Nowadays, the instalments generally mark chapter breaks in the larger novel.

to:

Many of his works were first published as multi-part serials, complete with cliffhangers. A typical 'Dickensian' scenario features hordes of memorable -- often CatchPhrase-spouting -- characters tumbling through even more outrageously contrived plots. They would be delivered to the subscribing public in small bound monthly instalments installments of three or four chapters at a time (rather like the modern comic-book industry) over the course of two or three years. Nowadays, the instalments generally mark chapter breaks in the larger novel.
22nd Aug '16 2:58:12 PM Premonition45
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'''Charles John Huffham Dickens''' (1812 - 1870) was the foremost English novelist of the 19th century, and is to this day one of the most famous authors in the English language.

to:

'''Charles John Huffham Dickens''' (1812 - (February 7, 1812 -- June 9, 1870) was the foremost English novelist of the 19th century, and is to this day one of the most famous authors in the English language.
17th Jun '16 1:14:27 AM PaulA
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* ''Literature/TheOldCuriosityShop'' - Containing the renowned Death of Little Nell (no, not [[Series/NCISLosAngeles that one]]), by reader acclaim the most tragic deathbed scene in English literature to that point...and these were ''Victorian'' readers, so you know the competition had to be stiff. Although {{Oscar Wilde}} said that you'd need a heart of stone to read it without dissolving in tears of laughter.

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* ''Literature/TheOldCuriosityShop'' - Containing the renowned Death of Little Nell (no, not [[Series/NCISLosAngeles that one]]), by reader acclaim the most tragic deathbed scene in English literature to that point...and these were ''Victorian'' readers, so you know the competition had to be stiff. Although {{Oscar Wilde}} Creator/OscarWilde said that you'd need a heart of stone to read it without dissolving in tears of laughter.
10th Jan '16 6:49:27 PM DoctorCooper
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* {{Padding}}: Getting paid by the word while spending a lot of time in financial difficulties naturally led to a good deal of it.

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* {{Padding}}: {{Padding}}:[[invoked]] Getting paid by the word while spending a lot of time in financial difficulties naturally led to a good deal of it.
28th Dec '15 10:49:52 AM Kitchen90
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[[quoteright:332:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/62908_o_4735.jpg]]

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Many of his works were first published as multi-part serials, complete with cliffhangers. A typical 'Dickensian' scenario features hordes of memorable -- often CatchPhrase-spouting -- characters tumbling through even more outrageously contrived plots. They would be delivered to the subscribing public in small bound monthly installments of three or four chapters at a time (rather like the modern comic-book industry) over the course of two or three years. Nowadays, the installments generally mark chapter breaks in the larger novel.

This setup resulted in the books serving as the the soap operas of the day, and the subsequent need to keep reader interest alive accounts for the convoluted nature of much of Dickens' plotting. The more readers, the more subscription fees; a very direct connection to the fanbase, so to speak. If sales dropped over the latest plot twist, Dickens would sometimes be forced to undo months of careful pre-planning.

to:

Many of his works were first published as multi-part serials, complete with cliffhangers. A typical 'Dickensian' scenario features hordes of memorable -- often CatchPhrase-spouting -- characters tumbling through even more outrageously contrived plots. They would be delivered to the subscribing public in small bound monthly installments instalments of three or four chapters at a time (rather like the modern comic-book industry) over the course of two or three years. Nowadays, the installments instalments generally mark chapter breaks in the larger novel.

This setup set-up resulted in the books serving as the the soap operas of the day, and the subsequent need to keep reader interest alive accounts for the convoluted nature of much of Dickens' plotting. The more readers, the more subscription fees; a very direct connection to the fanbase, so to speak. If sales dropped over the latest plot twist, Dickens would sometimes be forced to undo months of careful pre-planning.
28th Dec '15 10:47:02 AM Kitchen90
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/62908_o_4735.jpg]]

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17th Oct '15 8:03:07 PM ProfessorDetective
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11th May '15 4:50:24 AM Patachou
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Added DiffLines:

He ended at #41 in ''Series/OneHundredGreatestBritons''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.CharlesDickens