History Creator / Aristotle

14th Mar '17 9:30:28 PM SoapheadChurch
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* GoldenMeanFallacy: Later Aristoteleans originated this fallacy through incomplete or overly simplistic readings of definition of virtue as a mean between excess and deficit. Aristotle himself explicitly [[DefiedTrope defied]] this in his ''Nichomachean Ethics'': he admonishes that virtue is proportionate to the context, not a midpoint between two arbitrary extremes. Additionally, some vices (such as envy, murder, and adultery) don't have counterparts for which a mean can be judged, and therefore are always bad.

to:

* GoldenMeanFallacy: Later Aristoteleans originated this fallacy through incomplete or overly simplistic readings of his definition of virtue as a mean between excess and deficit. Aristotle himself explicitly [[DefiedTrope defied]] this in his ''Nichomachean Ethics'': he admonishes that virtue is proportionate to the context, not a midpoint between two arbitrary extremes. Additionally, some vices (such as envy, murder, and adultery) don't have counterparts for which a mean can be judged, and therefore are always bad.
14th Mar '17 4:08:31 PM SoapheadChurch
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* GoldenMeanFallacy: Later Aristoteleans originated this fallacy through incomplete or overly simplistic readings of definition of virtue a a mean between excess and deficit. Aristotle himself explicitly [[DefiedTrope defied]] this in his ''Nichomachean Ethics'': he admonishes that virtue is proportionate to the context, not a midpoint between two arbitrary extremes. Additionally, some vices (such as envy, murder, and adultery) don't have counterparts for which a mean can be judged, and therefore are always bad.

to:

* GoldenMeanFallacy: Later Aristoteleans originated this fallacy through incomplete or overly simplistic readings of definition of virtue a as a mean between excess and deficit. Aristotle himself explicitly [[DefiedTrope defied]] this in his ''Nichomachean Ethics'': he admonishes that virtue is proportionate to the context, not a midpoint between two arbitrary extremes. Additionally, some vices (such as envy, murder, and adultery) don't have counterparts for which a mean can be judged, and therefore are always bad.
14th Mar '17 4:05:53 PM SoapheadChurch
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* GoldenMeanFallacy: Later Aristoteleans originated this fallacy through incomplete or overly simplistic readings of his works. Aristotle himself explicitly [[DefiedTrope defied]] this in his ''Nichomachean Ethics'': he admonishes that virtue is proportionate to the context, not a midpoint between two arbitrary extremes. Additionally, some vices (such as envy, murder, and adultery) don't have counterparts for which a mean can be judged, and therefore are always bad.

to:

* GoldenMeanFallacy: Later Aristoteleans originated this fallacy through incomplete or overly simplistic readings of his works.definition of virtue a a mean between excess and deficit. Aristotle himself explicitly [[DefiedTrope defied]] this in his ''Nichomachean Ethics'': he admonishes that virtue is proportionate to the context, not a midpoint between two arbitrary extremes. Additionally, some vices (such as envy, murder, and adultery) don't have counterparts for which a mean can be judged, and therefore are always bad.
8th Mar '17 11:06:59 PM SoapheadChurch
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* ForHappiness: According to ''Ethics,'' this is the end for which justice and virtue are the means.
* GoodFeelsGood: He takes this position in his ''Ethics'': virtue and happiness are inseparable, and the greatest happiness is in the greatest virtue.

to:

* ForHappiness: According to ''Ethics,'' ''Nichomachean Ethics,'' this is the end for which justice and virtue are the means.
* GoldenMeanFallacy: Later Aristoteleans originated this fallacy through incomplete or overly simplistic readings of his works. Aristotle himself explicitly [[DefiedTrope defied]] this in his ''Nichomachean Ethics'': he admonishes that virtue is proportionate to the context, not a midpoint between two arbitrary extremes. Additionally, some vices (such as envy, murder, and adultery) don't have counterparts for which a mean can be judged, and therefore are always bad.
* GoodFeelsGood: He takes this position in his ''Ethics'': ''Nichomachean Ethics'': virtue and happiness are inseparable, and the greatest happiness is in the greatest virtue.



* IJustWantToHaveFriends: In his ''Ethics'', he discusses this, suggesting that it is impossible to live a fully happy and virtuous life without having close friends.

to:

* IJustWantToHaveFriends: In his ''Ethics'', ''Nichomachean Ethics'', he discusses this, suggesting that it is impossible to live a fully happy and virtuous life without having close friends.



* PlatoIsAMoron: Done in a downplayed, roundabout way in ''Ethics'' when he explains that he will not use his teacher's Theory of Forms because his own philosophy is more practical. Aristotle's scientific works also fell victim to this during the Renaissance, with a new generation of scientists dethroning him from his dominant role in the Western intellectual tradition.

to:

* PlatoIsAMoron: Done in a downplayed, roundabout way in ''Ethics'' ''Nichomachean Ethics'' when he explains that he will not use his teacher's Theory of Forms because his own philosophy is more practical. Aristotle's scientific works also fell victim to this during the Renaissance, with a new generation of scientists dethroning him from his dominant role in the Western intellectual tradition.
19th Feb '17 8:44:00 PM SoapheadChurch
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* DemocracyIsBad: Just like his teacher, he used "democracy" as a term of art for what happens when a popular government goes bad.[note]A good popular government was called a ''politea''.[[/note]] He maintained, however, that a government where the multitude have power is just as valid as one where a select few or a single person has power, as long as it is done correctly. His ideal government combines traits of all three.

to:

* DemocracyIsBad: Just like his teacher, he used "democracy" as a term of art for what happens when a popular government goes bad.[note]A [[note]]A good popular government was called a ''politea''.[[/note]] He maintained, however, that a government where the multitude have power is just as valid as one where a select few or a single person has power, as long as it is done correctly. His ideal government combines traits of all three.
19th Feb '17 8:37:36 PM SoapheadChurch
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* HeManWomanHater: He has this reputation thanks in part to ValuesDissonance. He did consider women to be naturally inferior to men and believed that they should be ruled over as only slightly better than slaves and children. However, in his ''Rhetoric'' and ''Oikonomios'', he advocates treating women kindly and valuing their happiness. Ultimately, his attitude towards women is more [[CondecendingCompassion patronizing than anything else.]]

to:

* HeManWomanHater: He has this reputation thanks in part to ValuesDissonance. He did consider women to be naturally inferior to men and believed that they should be ruled over as only slightly better than slaves and children. However, in his ''Rhetoric'' and ''Oikonomios'', he advocates treating women kindly and valuing their happiness. Ultimately, his attitude towards women is more [[CondecendingCompassion [[CondescendingCompassion patronizing than anything else.]]
19th Feb '17 8:37:03 PM SoapheadChurch
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* HeManWomenHater: He has this reputation thanks in part to ValuesDissonance. He did consider women to be naturally inferior to men and believed that they should be ruled over as only slightly better than slaves and children. However, in his ''Rhetoric'' and ''Oikonomios'', he advocates treating women kindly and valuing their happiness. Ultimately, his attitude towards women is more [[CondecendingCompassion patronizing than anything else.]]

to:

* HeManWomenHater: HeManWomanHater: He has this reputation thanks in part to ValuesDissonance. He did consider women to be naturally inferior to men and believed that they should be ruled over as only slightly better than slaves and children. However, in his ''Rhetoric'' and ''Oikonomios'', he advocates treating women kindly and valuing their happiness. Ultimately, his attitude towards women is more [[CondecendingCompassion patronizing than anything else.]]
19th Feb '17 5:59:47 PM SoapheadChurch
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* DemocracyIsBad: Just like his teacher, he used "democracy" as a term of art for what happens when a popular government goes bad. He maintained, however, that the ideal government will mix the attributes of democracy (rule by many), aristocracy (rule by few), and monarchy (rule by one).
* GoodFeelsGood: According to Aristotle, virtue and happiness are inseparable, and the greatest happiness is in the greatest virtue.

to:

* DemocracyIsBad: Just like his teacher, he used "democracy" as a term of art for what happens when a popular government goes bad. [note]A good popular government was called a ''politea''.[[/note]] He maintained, however, that a government where the multitude have power is just as valid as one where a select few or a single person has power, as long as it is done correctly. His ideal government will mix combines traits of all three.
* ForHappiness: According to ''Ethics,'' this is
the attributes of democracy (rule by many), aristocracy (rule by few), end for which justice and monarchy (rule by one).virtue are the means.
* GoodFeelsGood: According to Aristotle, He takes this position in his ''Ethics'': virtue and happiness are inseparable, and the greatest happiness is in the greatest virtue.virtue.
* HeManWomenHater: He has this reputation thanks in part to ValuesDissonance. He did consider women to be naturally inferior to men and believed that they should be ruled over as only slightly better than slaves and children. However, in his ''Rhetoric'' and ''Oikonomios'', he advocates treating women kindly and valuing their happiness. Ultimately, his attitude towards women is more [[CondecendingCompassion patronizing than anything else.]]


Added DiffLines:

* MeasuringTheMarigolds: In his ''Metaphysics'', Aristotle cautions against this attitude, stating that there are some questions that physical science simply can't answer.


Added DiffLines:

* TakeAThirdOption: In his ''Rhetoric'': his teacher Plato despised sophistry, considering it a distortion of truth; the Sophists disdained philosophy because they thought it was meaningless navel-gazing. Aristotle considered philosophy and rhetoric parts of the same whole and synthesized them. He still has some pretty harsh words for the Sophists, though.
* WordSaladPhilosophy: His ''Metaphysics'' had this reputation among Medieval scholars. It was a difficult book to begin with, and only got more incoherent in translation.
14th Feb '17 5:51:03 PM SoapheadChurch
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* AcceptableBreaksFromReality: He practically invented the concept, as quoted above, in his ''Poetics'': it doesn't matter if story elements are accurate or possible, only that the audience can accept them.



%% * IJustWantToHaveFriends

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%% * IJustWantToHaveFriendsContemplateOurNavels: Aristotle encouraged his readers to devote as much time to this as possible, considering philosophical contemplation the highest aspiration of humankind.
* DemocracyIsBad: Just like his teacher, he used "democracy" as a term of art for what happens when a popular government goes bad. He maintained, however, that the ideal government will mix the attributes of democracy (rule by many), aristocracy (rule by few), and monarchy (rule by one).
* GoodFeelsGood: According to Aristotle, virtue and happiness are inseparable, and the greatest happiness is in the greatest virtue.
* IJustWantToHaveFriends: In his ''Ethics'', he discusses this, suggesting that it is impossible to live a fully happy and virtuous life without having close friends.
* PlatoIsAMoron: Done in a downplayed, roundabout way in ''Ethics'' when he explains that he will not use his teacher's Theory of Forms because his own philosophy is more practical. Aristotle's scientific works also fell victim to this during the Renaissance, with a new generation of scientists dethroning him from his dominant role in the Western intellectual tradition.



21st Oct '16 5:18:24 AM TheBigBopper
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Aristotle is also important within science. His work of categorizing plants laid much of the foundation for today's biology. He also tried himself at physics, and his theories were commonly accepted for almost two thousand years - until people started to actually test them, and found many of them to be completely wrong. For example, Aristotle used logic to determine that if two objects with similar form and volume but different mass are dropped simultaneously, the heaviest one will land first. Medieval natural philosophers started to realize that this was wrong, and later disproved this by actually dropping two objects with said qualities, and finding that they landed at the same time.

to:

Aristotle is also important within science. His work of categorizing plants laid much of the foundation for today's biology. He also tried himself at physics, and his theories were commonly accepted for almost two thousand years - until people started to actually test them, and found many of them to be completely wrong. For example, Aristotle used logic to determine that if two objects with similar form and volume but different mass are dropped simultaneously, the heaviest one will land first. Medieval natural philosophers started to realize that this was wrong, and later disproved this it by actually dropping two objects with said qualities, and finding that they landed at the same time.
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