History Creator / AnneMcCaffrey

13th May '16 12:13:51 AM PaulA
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* ''Literature/TowerAndTheHive''' series

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* ''Literature/TowerAndTheHive''' ''Literature/TowerAndTheHive'' series
10th May '16 10:47:23 PM PaulA
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* '''Literature/TowerAndTheHive''' AKA: ''Rowan'', ''Talents'' or ''Pegasus'' (eight total)

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* '''Literature/TowerAndTheHive''' AKA: ''Rowan'', aka ''Rowan'' or ''Talents'' or ''Pegasus'' (eight total)(five novels)/'''Literature/ToRidePegasus''' (three novels)


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* ''Literature/ToRidePegasus'' trilogy
10th May '16 8:23:02 PM PaulA
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* '''Freedom''' (four novels)

to:

* '''Freedom''' '''Literature/{{Catteni}}''' (four novels)



* ''Literature/{{Catteni}}'' series



* AdaptationExpansion: The first novel of the ''Freedom'' series is expanded from a short story called "The Thorns of Barevi". The novel starts much like the short story and follows its plot up to the point where TheyDo, at which point they ''don't'', and the plot goes off on a dramatic tangent. (Even in the novel they do eventually, at which point there's a version of the short story's final scene.)



* CatFolk:
** The Hrrubans in the ''Doona'' series.
** The Catteni in the ''Freedom'' series.

to:

* CatFolk:
**
CatFolk: The Hrrubans in the ''Doona'' series.
** The Catteni in the ''Freedom''
series.



* EasilyThwartedAlienInvasion: In the ''Freedom'' series, the preferred host species of the Eosi ([[GrandTheftMe body-snatching]] {{Evil Overlord}}s) is deathly allergic to a plant that grows in abundance on Botany, the planet the main characters were stranded on. LaResistance manages to sneak boatloads of the plant's pollen into the ventilation system at a suspiciously fortunate gathering of 90% of the Eosi. The surviving Eosi were too few and scattered to retain their grip on their servant races.



* IChooseToStay: In the ''Freedom'' series:
** Zainal, a Catteni military officer mistakenly sent to the slave colony world, Botany (named by the humans placed there) rebuffs several attempts by the slavemasters to take him back home. The first out of spite: he knows the dockmaster responsible for his being there will be punished for it, if he stays long enough for the right people to notice his absence. Later on, it's because he's come to respect the humans who've managed to carve out a place for themselves (one female in particular) and wanted to stay and help them. We find out in a later book that [[spoiler:Zainal is also a high-ranking member of his homeworld's LaResistance AND due to be the next vessel for one of the body-snatching {{Evil Overlord}}s that have enslaved ''his'' people and if that happens, things will end badly for lots of people]].
** This also applies to most of the humans placed on Botany. "I dropped, I stay!" becomes something of a slogan/rallying cry.
* InterspeciesRomance: Kris and Zainal in the ''Freedom'' series.
* MandatoryMotherhood: The ''Freedom'' series involves a LostColony situation in which everyone has to breed. Kris, the protagonist, is involved in an InterspeciesRomance and is apathetic on having kids (and definitely against cheating), even if her alien boyfriend doesn't mind. She then gets injured and winds up drinking to dull the pain to the point of ''blacking out'' and having sex with other humans. Twice.



* MustHaveCaffeine: By the last book of the ''Freedom'' series, the aliens are hopelessly addicted to coffee and it serves as a major trade and diplomacy item.
* NamedAfterTheirPlanet: In the ''Freedom'' series, the alien overlords are called the Catteni, and they come from the planet Catten. One of the characters lampshades this when they discover the capital of the planet is called Cattena.
* NamingYourColonyWorld:
** The symbolically named planet Botany in the ''Freedom'' series.
** ''Nimisha's Ship'' has a planet named Erewhon, which is perfectly descriptive.
* PlanetTerra: In the ''Freedom'' series, the humans are referred to as "Terrans" by the alien Catteni, and sometimes by the humans themselves.
* RescueSex:
** In "The Thorns of Barevi", which [=McCaffrey=] wrote as a ... profit-seeking experiment with fantasy softcore, a young woman and a male HumanAlien evade pursuers with the help of the eponymous plants, then have sex.
** Subverted in ''Freedom's Landing'', the novel-length expansion; in fact the point at which the novel seriously diverges from the short story is when Zainal attempts to show his gratitude by having sex with Kris and is surprised when she refuses. They do end up together, though.
* RubberForeheadAliens: The Catteni from the ''Freedom'' series would be HumanAliens except for their grey skin. This is made fairly explicit when several human characters successfully disguise themselves as Catteni with face paint.
* ToolsOfSapience: In ''Decision at Doona'', human settlers on a new world encounter a village of intelligent cats. Both species assume the other is pre-sentient due to the primitive living conditions in each other's colonies. The aliens decide the humans are intelligent based on a child's ability to play games.
* TranslationConvention: All the dialogue in the ''Freedom'' series is rendered in English; however, early in the first book, one of the characters is giving out orders, and the narrator specifically notes that one of the words in his speech is in English. It is later stated that everyone actually speaks a creole of four or five different languages.
* VertebrateWithExtraLimbs: In the ''Freedom'' series, there are "loo-cows" that have six legs in order to constantly pound the ground at night and keep the monsters that live underground at bay.

to:

* MustHaveCaffeine: By the last book of the ''Freedom'' series, the aliens are hopelessly addicted to coffee and it serves as a major trade and diplomacy item.
* NamedAfterTheirPlanet: In the ''Freedom'' series, the alien overlords are called the Catteni, and they come from the planet Catten. One of the characters lampshades this when they discover the capital of the planet is called Cattena.
* NamingYourColonyWorld:
** The symbolically named planet Botany in the ''Freedom'' series.
**
NamingYourColonyWorld: ''Nimisha's Ship'' has a planet named Erewhon, which is perfectly descriptive.
* PlanetTerra: In the ''Freedom'' series, the humans are referred to as "Terrans" by the alien Catteni, and sometimes by the humans themselves.
* RescueSex:
**
RescueSex: In "The Thorns of Barevi", which [=McCaffrey=] wrote as a ... profit-seeking experiment with fantasy softcore, a young woman and a male HumanAlien evade pursuers with the help of the eponymous plants, then have sex.
** Subverted in ''Freedom's Landing'', the novel-length expansion; in fact the point at which the novel seriously diverges from the short story is when Zainal attempts to show his gratitude by having sex with Kris and is surprised when she refuses. They do end up together, though.
* RubberForeheadAliens: The Catteni from the ''Freedom'' series would be HumanAliens except for their grey skin. This is made fairly explicit when several human characters successfully disguise themselves as Catteni with face paint.
* ToolsOfSapience: In ''Decision at Doona'', human settlers on a new world encounter a village of intelligent cats. Both species assume the other is pre-sentient due to the primitive living conditions in each other's colonies. The aliens decide the humans are intelligent based on a child's ability to play games. \n* TranslationConvention: All the dialogue in the ''Freedom'' series is rendered in English; however, early in the first book, one of the characters is giving out orders, and the narrator specifically notes that one of the words in his speech is in English. It is later stated that everyone actually speaks a creole of four or five different languages.\n* VertebrateWithExtraLimbs: In the ''Freedom'' series, there are "loo-cows" that have six legs in order to constantly pound the ground at night and keep the monsters that live underground at bay.
10th May '16 7:44:33 PM PaulA
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[[index]]


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[[/index]]
10th May '16 7:40:26 PM PaulA
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* '''Crystal Singer''' (three novels). Set vaguely in ''Literature/TheShipWho...'' universe, though the former series does not mention the latter.

to:

* '''Crystal Singer''' '''Literature/CrystalSinger''' (three novels). Set vaguely in ''Literature/TheShipWho...'' universe, though the former series does not mention the latter.



* ''Literature/CrystalSinger'' series



* BlessedWithSuck: In the ''Crystal Singer'' series, candidates to join the Heptite Guild (prospectors for crystals needed for interstellar communication) are exposed to microscopic symbiotes by the very atmosphere of Ballybran itself. The symbiotes grant those exposed with extended lifespans, enhanced physical abilities and super senses -- unless they die, or only get a partial enhancement. The majority will end up with one sense enhanced to a PowerIncontinence level (one wears special lenses to keep him from seeing everything on a microscopic level), and sometimes the enhancement will boost one sense and shut down another (another with super vision is rendered deaf). The Singers (those with perfect transitions) don't escape unscathed either, as constant exposure to the piezoelectric fields of the crystals scrambles their brains, causing memory loss and personality alterations. And they ALL share an inability to leave Ballybran for long, otherwise their symbiont will start to weaken, causing them to sicken and die. Veteran Singers tend to either break down physically and retire to a convalescent home or get locked into a cycle of "Obsessively mine enough crystal to make it off Ballybran for a long time, be forced to return to renew the symbiont or when the money runs out, rinse, repeat." The risks are considered "worth it", due to the long hedonistic lifestyle the lucky ones get to live before things start to sour.



* ComputerizedJudicialSystem: Near the end of the Crystal Singer novel ''Killashandra'', Killashandra's boyfriend Lars Dahl is given a computer-controlled trial for kidnapping her as well as other charges. She has forgiven him and wants him to be acquitted, but the Judicial Monitor computer's equipment reads her heightened vital signs, misinterprets them as her being afraid of him, and finds him guilty of one of the charges. Eventually he's cleared of the charge and he and Killashandra get back together.



* DepartureMeansDeath: In the ''Crystal Singer'' trilogy, once you've been infected with the symbiotic organism that allows you to live on the planet where they harvest crystals that allow warp-travel, you can't leave for very long, or you start going insane and then die. Some can leave for two or three years, others as little as a few months.



* TheFogOfAges: Crystal Singers have this problem, though it's brought on more by long-term exposure to Ballybran crystal than actual age. [[spoiler:Killashandra eventually finds a solution to this problem, accidentally.]]



* ReallySevenHundredYearsOld: In the ''Crystal Singer'' series, all Crystal Singers have extended lifespans (along with a healing factor and varying degrees of super senses) due to the native symbiotic organisms that permeate the atmosphere of Ballybran, the source of the crystals. At the end of the third book, the protagonist, Killashandra, is revealed to be over 230 years old. (Her first appearance in the first book has her in her early 20s.)



* SongsInTheKeyOfLock: In ''Killashandra'', part of the ''Crystal Singer'' series, the lock hiding the illegal computer equipment inside the organ is opened by playing a (supposedly) original melody. Fortunately, the protagonist knows Beethoven's fifth symphony, and can play the opening line "accidentally" while tuning it.
* SuperpowerRussianRoulette: In the ''Crystal Singer'', the adjustment to Ballybran's symbiotes follows more of a bell curve: a few die, a few attain the heightened senses needed to become a crystal singer, but most just end up with mild handicaps, mainly in the form of Super Senses they can't turn off.
* TheSymbiote: The symbiote from the ''Crystal Singer'' novels has a low success rate for adaptation to human hosts. Those who survive, though, gain a HealingFactor that makes them virtually immortal, barring murder or immediately-lethal accident. [[spoiler:Too bad about the slow memory loss, dementia, and paranoia...]]
8th May '16 9:55:42 PM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* TheFogOfAges: Crystal Singers have this problem, though it's brought on more by long-term exposure to Ballybran crystal than actual age. [[spoiler:Killashandra eventually finds a solution to this problem, accidentally.]]


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* RescueSex:
** In "The Thorns of Barevi", which [=McCaffrey=] wrote as a ... profit-seeking experiment with fantasy softcore, a young woman and a male HumanAlien evade pursuers with the help of the eponymous plants, then have sex.
** Subverted in ''Freedom's Landing'', the novel-length expansion; in fact the point at which the novel seriously diverges from the short story is when Zainal attempts to show his gratitude by having sex with Kris and is surprised when she refuses. They do end up together, though.
8th May '16 9:09:06 PM PaulA
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* CanonWelding: The incidental details of ''Crystal Singer'' series include BB Ships, the main plot device of [=McCaffrey=]'s earlier ''Literature/TheShipWho...'' stories.

to:

* CanonWelding: CanonWelding:
**
The incidental details of ''Crystal Singer'' series include BB Ships, the main plot device of [=McCaffrey=]'s earlier ''Literature/TheShipWho...'' stories.stories.
** The short story "Duty Calls" includes both a BB Ship and a Hrruban (the alien race from ''Decision at Doona''), tying those two series together.


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* HighlyConspicuousUniform: In the short story "Duty Calls", the Hrruban officer first appears wearing shades and dyes that would seem to make her stand out a mile away. It is explained that the camouflage was chosen specifically to hide her from the alien race occupying the planet she's infiltrating, since they do not ''see'' the same way.
* IChooseToStay: In the ''Freedom'' series:
** Zainal, a Catteni military officer mistakenly sent to the slave colony world, Botany (named by the humans placed there) rebuffs several attempts by the slavemasters to take him back home. The first out of spite: he knows the dockmaster responsible for his being there will be punished for it, if he stays long enough for the right people to notice his absence. Later on, it's because he's come to respect the humans who've managed to carve out a place for themselves (one female in particular) and wanted to stay and help them. We find out in a later book that [[spoiler:Zainal is also a high-ranking member of his homeworld's LaResistance AND due to be the next vessel for one of the body-snatching {{Evil Overlord}}s that have enslaved ''his'' people and if that happens, things will end badly for lots of people]].
** This also applies to most of the humans placed on Botany. "I dropped, I stay!" becomes something of a slogan/rallying cry.
* InterspeciesRomance: Kris and Zainal in the ''Freedom'' series.
* MandatoryMotherhood: The ''Freedom'' series involves a LostColony situation in which everyone has to breed. Kris, the protagonist, is involved in an InterspeciesRomance and is apathetic on having kids (and definitely against cheating), even if her alien boyfriend doesn't mind. She then gets injured and winds up drinking to dull the pain to the point of ''blacking out'' and having sex with other humans. Twice.
* MasterOfYourDomain: The ''Dinosaur Planet'' books feature "Discipline": a full-featured body-control/pain-control/emotion-control/adrenal-control technique that many of the characters practice.


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* MrSeahorse: A short story in which an alien prostitute impregnates half the male population of a small town. The title, "Literature/AHorseFromADifferentSea", references the seahorse analogy.


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* NamedAfterTheirPlanet: In the ''Freedom'' series, the alien overlords are called the Catteni, and they come from the planet Catten. One of the characters lampshades this when they discover the capital of the planet is called Cattena.


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* PlanetTerra: In the ''Freedom'' series, the humans are referred to as "Terrans" by the alien Catteni, and sometimes by the humans themselves.
8th May '16 7:59:06 PM PaulA
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* {{Demythificaton}}: ''Black Horses for the King'' is a demythification of Myth/KingArthur, told from the viewpoint of a stable boy.

to:

* {{Demythificaton}}: {{Demythification}}: ''Black Horses for the King'' is a demythification of Myth/KingArthur, told from the viewpoint of a stable boy.
8th May '16 7:58:10 PM PaulA
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* DeathWorld: Ireta, the setting of ''Dinosaur Planet'', has an extremely active ecology, complete with a mix of toxic alien life and adapted prehistoric Earth life. There are even insect swarms that eat dinosaurs bones and all.
* {{Demythificaton}}: ''Black Horses for the King'' is a demythification of Myth/KingArthur, told from the viewpoint of a stable boy.
6th May '16 2:36:46 AM PaulA
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* TheSympiote: The symbiote from the ''Crystal Singer'' novels has a low success rate for adaptation to human hosts. Those who survive, though, gain a HealingFactor that makes them virtually immortal, barring murder or immediately-lethal accident. [[spoiler:Too bad about the slow memory loss, dementia, and paranoia...]]

to:

* TheSympiote: TheSymbiote: The symbiote from the ''Crystal Singer'' novels has a low success rate for adaptation to human hosts. Those who survive, though, gain a HealingFactor that makes them virtually immortal, barring murder or immediately-lethal accident. [[spoiler:Too bad about the slow memory loss, dementia, and paranoia...]]
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