History Creator / AgathaChristie

3rd Aug '16 9:03:51 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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[[UsefulNotes/KnightFever Dame]] Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie (15 September 1890 12 January 1976) was the Queen of English MysteryFiction, ranked with Creator/ArthurConanDoyle as the greatest mystery writer of all time. Her stories are elaborately plotted puzzle pieces, full of false identities and faked deaths. She enjoyed a very long career; her first novel, ''The Mysterious Affair at Styles'', was published in 1920, while her final novel, ''Sleeping Murder'', was published posthumously in 1976. Among the best-selling authors of all time[[note]]The ''Guinness Book'' says she's sold more books than any other individual author. If you count shorter works, Creator/WilliamShakespeare takes the lead. If corporations are invited, the collected works of Creator/WaltDisney Productions top the list. Regardless, she's sold three billion copies in over 100 languages[[/note]].

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[[UsefulNotes/KnightFever Dame]] Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie (15 September 1890 12 January 1976) was the Queen of English MysteryFiction, ranked with Creator/ArthurConanDoyle as the greatest mystery writer of all time. Her stories are elaborately plotted puzzle pieces, full of false identities and faked deaths. She enjoyed a very long career; her first novel, ''The Mysterious Affair at Styles'', was published in 1920, while her final novel, ''Sleeping Murder'', was published posthumously in 1976. Among the best-selling authors of all time[[note]]The ''Guinness Book'' ''[[Literature/GuinnessWorldRecords Guinness Book]]'' says she's sold more books than any other individual author. If you count shorter works, Creator/WilliamShakespeare takes the lead. If corporations are invited, the collected works of Creator/WaltDisney Productions top the list. Regardless, she's sold three billion copies in over 100 languages[[/note]].
29th Jul '16 5:35:30 AM Adept
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Literature/TheClocks'' (1964)
25th Jul '16 6:11:46 AM Adept
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* {{Expy}}: After noting how much she enjoyed writing the gossipy spinster Caroline Sheppard in ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'', Christie decided to revamp this character into someone who would become a fixture in her work -- Miss Jane Marple.

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* {{Expy}}: {{Expy}}:
**
After noting how much she enjoyed writing the gossipy spinster Caroline Sheppard in ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'', Christie decided to revamp this character into someone who would become a fixture in her work -- Miss Jane Marple.



** It is outright stated in ''Sparkling Cyanide'' that Inspector Kemp is basically a less competent version of Battle. Kemp used to work under the former Superintendent and has adopted many of his mannerism.



* GenteelInterbellumSetting: The former TropeNamer. Despite this, Christie did make an effort to have her novels keep up with the changing times, with varying degrees of success.
** Completely averted by ''Death Comes As The End'', which is set in Ancient Egypt.
* GolfClubbing: A golf club is the murder weapon in ''Spider's Web''.

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* GenteelInterbellumSetting: The former TropeNamer. Despite this, Christie did make an effort to have her novels keep up with the changing times, with varying degrees of success.
GolfClubbing:
** Completely averted by ''Death Comes As The End'', which is set in Ancient Egypt.
* GolfClubbing:
A golf club is the murder weapon in ''Spider's Web''.



* UpperClassTwit: Aristocrats are often depicted in Christie's books as silly and self-absorbed, something which Superintendent Battle lampshades in ''The Secret of Chimneys''. Examples of this are Sir Eustace Pedler (''The Man In Brown Suit'') and Lord Caterham (''Secret of Chimneys'' & ''Seven Dials Mystery''), who, in their respective novels, whines about how inconsiderate people are for dying in their properties and causing them a lot of trouble due to the subsequent scandals that occur.

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* UpperClassTwit: Aristocrats are often depicted in Christie's books as silly and self-absorbed, something which Superintendent Battle lampshades in ''The Secret of Chimneys''. Examples of this are Sir Eustace Pedler (''The Man In Brown Suit'') and Lord Caterham (''Secret of Chimneys'' & ''Seven Dials Mystery''), who, in their respective novels, whines about how inconsiderate people are for dying in their properties and causing them a lot of trouble due to the subsequent scandals that occur. Even Bundle, who is a lot more sensible than her family, briefly expresses indignation when she finds out that the first victim of ''Seven Dials'' died in ''her'' room.
23rd Jul '16 9:41:18 PM Adept
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* LoveAtFirstSight: Many of the romantic developments in Christie's stories develop very rapidly when two people meet and is immediately consumed by passion for each other.
** In ''The Man In Brown Suit'', Anne rescues a young man and becomes so infatuated with him that she's willing to "walk across Africa" for his sake.
** In ''The Clocks'', Sheila Webb runs into Colin Lamb, and the latter immediately declares her as "his" girl.



* UpperClassTwit: Aristocrats are often depicted in Christie's books as silly and self-absorbed, something which Superintendent Battle lampshades in ''The Secret of Chimneys''. Examples of this are Sir Eustace Pedler (''The Man In Brown Suit'') and Lord Caterham (''Secret of Chimneys'' & ''Seven Dials Mystery''), who, in their respective novels, whines about how inconsiderate people are for dying in their properties and causing them a lot of trouble due to the subsequent scandals that occur.



** A minor character, Mr. Robinson, appeared briefly with each of Poirot and Miss Marple, as well as in ''Passenger to Frankfurt'', which featured neither of them.
*** He also appears in ''Postern of Fate'', with Tommy and Tuppence.

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** A minor character, Mr. Robinson, appeared briefly with each of Poirot and Miss Marple, as well as in ''Passenger to Frankfurt'', which featured neither of them.
***
them. He also appears in ''Postern of Fate'', with Tommy and Tuppence.



** Superintendent Battle of Scotland Yard, another of Christie's lesser-known detectives (''Towards Zero'', etc.) is a supporting character in the Hercule Poirot novel ''Literature/CardsOnTheTable'' and is mentioned in at least one other Hercule Poirot novel (''Hercule Poirot's Christmas''); his (by WordOfGod) son appears in ''The Clocks'', another Poirot novel.

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** Superintendent Battle of Scotland Yard, another of Christie's lesser-known detectives (''Towards Zero'', etc.) is a supporting character in the Hercule Poirot novel ''Literature/CardsOnTheTable'' and is mentioned in at least one other Hercule Poirot novel (''Hercule Poirot's Christmas''); his (by WordOfGod) son appears in ''The Clocks'', another Poirot novel.
22nd Jul '16 10:28:10 AM Adept
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%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.



* AmbitionIsEvil: Turns up in several Christie works.
* AnyoneCanDie: And in some cases, ''[[KillEmAll everyone]]''
* {{Arcadia}}: Often deconstructed.
* AssholeVictim: On multiple occasions; see the pages for individual works for details.
** Notably averted in ''Towards Zero'' -- the victim is a good, caring and hospitable (if a tad old-fashioned) person, and her death serves as MoralEventHorizon in-universe, which is [[spoiler:actually the motive of her murder all along]].

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* %%* AmbitionIsEvil: Turns up in several Christie works.
* %%* AnyoneCanDie: And in some cases, ''[[KillEmAll everyone]]''
* %%* {{Arcadia}}: Often deconstructed.
* %%* AssholeVictim: On multiple occasions; see the pages for individual works for details.
** Notably averted in ''Towards Zero'' -- the victim is a good, caring and hospitable (if a tad old-fashioned) person, and her death serves as MoralEventHorizon in-universe, which is [[spoiler:actually the motive of her murder all along]].
details.



* AuthorAvatar: Ariadne Oliver
** In ''Literature/CardsOnTheTable'' (1937) Ariadne Oliver is the author of ''The Body in the Library''. Christie's real novel of the same name would be published in 1942.



* BewareTheNiceOnes: Where to begin?
* BewareTheQuietOnes: Likewise.
* BigScrewedUpFamily: ''Crooked House'' and ''Literature/DeathComesAsTheEnd'', among others.
* BitterAlmonds
* {{Blackmail}}: Often the quickest way to become the next corpse.
* BlackSheep: sometimes appears in BigScrewedUpFamily situations.
** ''Literature/DeathComesAsTheEnd'': Sobek, the second son, is a hard-drinking womanizer who wastes money on expensive dancing girls.

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* %%* BewareTheNiceOnes: Where to begin?
* %%* BewareTheQuietOnes: Likewise.
* %%* BigScrewedUpFamily: ''Crooked House'' and ''Literature/DeathComesAsTheEnd'', among others.
* %%* BitterAlmonds
* %%* {{Blackmail}}: Often the quickest way to become the next corpse.
* %%* BlackSheep: sometimes appears in BigScrewedUpFamily situations.
** %%** ''Literature/DeathComesAsTheEnd'': Sobek, the second son, is a hard-drinking womanizer who wastes money on expensive dancing girls.



* ClosedCircle: Multiple examples, described on their respective works pages.
* CluelessMystery: How the clues go together is usually made impossible for the reader to divine until the detective states it.
** Although the clues ''themselves'' will pretty much always point to the right person. The thing left out is usually details in their motivation.

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* %%* ClosedCircle: Multiple examples, described on their respective works pages.
* %%* CluelessMystery: How the clues go together is usually made impossible for the reader to divine until the detective states it.
** %%** Although the clues ''themselves'' will pretty much always point to the right person. The thing left out is usually details in their motivation.



* ConnectTheDeaths: Frequently used as a RedHerring; at least three novels feature murderers setting up a false pattern to conceal the true motive behind the crime.

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* %%* ConnectTheDeaths: Frequently used as a RedHerring; at least three novels feature murderers setting up a false pattern to conceal the true motive behind the crime.



* DrivenToSuicide: Multiple variations. See the trope page for a list.
* TheDutifulSon: sometimes appears in BigScrewedUpFamily situations.
** Yahmose, the eldest son in ''Literature/DeathComesAsTheEnd''.

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* %%* DrivenToSuicide: Multiple variations. See the trope page for a list.
* %%* TheDutifulSon: sometimes appears in BigScrewedUpFamily situations.
** %%** Yahmose, the eldest son in ''Literature/DeathComesAsTheEnd''.



* EnfantTerrible: [[spoiler:Josephine Leonides in ''Crooked House'']].

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* %%* EnfantTerrible: [[spoiler:Josephine Leonides in ''Crooked House'']].



* EverybodyDidIt: She wrote the Trope Maker for ''this'' one too.

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* %%* EverybodyDidIt: She wrote the Trope Maker for ''this'' one too.



* GreedyJew: Distressingly, Christie often relied on the pre-War stereotypes of Jews as somehow "other" in her stories and novels, though only occasionally going into truly offensive territory.
** She never had a Jew as ''the'' criminal (at least, as far as this troper is aware). Rather, she unthinkingly drew on the casually anti-Semitic stereotypes that were accepted in British society of her day. Shortly before the events that led to WWII, she met an actual hardcore anti-Semite and found the experience so disturbing that she went so far as to make a Jew, Sebastian Levine, one of her main sympathetic leads in the 1930 novel "Giant's Bread" (though humorously enough, she still made him a stereotypical Jew-- it was just a highly positive portrayal, making this more a subversion than an aversion). She also had the character of Oliver Manders in ''Three Act Tragedy'', published in 1936, who is another flat-out aversion. Oliver is written as distinctively attractive, though also distinctively "Jewish" and "other", but still ends up as the "good" man in the romantic triangle and gets the girl. ...But then again, ''The Hollow'' came out in 1946 and has perhaps Christie's worst Jewish character in the form of an irritating boss, the "vitriolic little Jewess" with the "awful corn shrike voice", who was a straight-up portrayal of this trope... It seems that Christie was equally comfortable casting Jews in positive and negative roles. It was just that her construction of Jewish characters (and all non-British characters, really) tended to pull on awkward and dated stereotypes for their assembly.
** After WW II Christie went back and edited the most offensive language out of her earlier books.

to:

* GreedyJew: Distressingly, Christie often relied on the pre-War stereotypes of Jews as somehow "other" in her stories and novels, though only occasionally going she rarely goes into the truly offensive territory.
** She never had a Jew as ''the'' criminal (at least, as far as this troper is aware). Rather, she unthinkingly drew on the casually anti-Semitic stereotypes that were accepted in British society of her day. Shortly before the events that led to WWII, she met an actual hardcore anti-Semite and found the experience so disturbing that she went so far as to make a Jew, Sebastian Levine, one of her main sympathetic leads in the 1930 novel "Giant's Bread" (though humorously enough, she still made him a stereotypical Jew-- it was just a highly positive portrayal, making this more a subversion than an aversion). She also had the character of Oliver Manders in ''Three Act Tragedy'', published in 1936, who is another flat-out aversion. Oliver is written as distinctively attractive, though also distinctively "Jewish" and "other", but still ends up as the "good" man in the romantic triangle and gets the girl. ...But then again, ''The Hollow'' came out in 1946 and has perhaps Christie's worst Jewish character in the form of an irritating boss, the "vitriolic little Jewess" with the "awful corn shrike voice", who was a straight-up portrayal of this trope... It seems that Christie was equally comfortable casting Jews in positive and negative roles. It was just that her construction of Jewish characters (and all non-British characters, really) tended to pull on awkward and dated stereotypes for their assembly.
**
territory. After WW II Christie went back and edited the most offensive language out of her earlier books.



* HeroicWannabe: William Smith in ''Murder on the Nile'' (''Death on the Nile'' play counterpart), constantly trying to win the heart of Christina Grant.
* HotGuysAreBastards : very, very much. The more attractive a man is, the more his appearance departs from the stuffy, military-ish rough and conservative Englishman, the more immoral he is. Attractive men will be suspected immediately, will usually remind the detectives of other handsome killers they've met, and if they're not the killers, they are likely to be accomplices, blackmailers or withholding evidence because they've acquired it while doing something immoral. Plus, with just a few exceptions, any affection of a handsome man for a woman is false, usually motivated by money.
** Possibly a case of WriteWhoYouKnow. Christie's first husband was a man like this; the marriage ended very badly.

to:

* %%* HeroicWannabe: William Smith in ''Murder on the Nile'' (''Death on the Nile'' play counterpart), constantly trying to win the heart of Christina Grant.
* %%* HotGuysAreBastards : very, very much. The more attractive a man is, the more his appearance departs from the stuffy, military-ish rough and conservative Englishman, the more immoral he is. Attractive men will be suspected immediately, will usually remind the detectives of other handsome killers they've met, and if they're not the killers, they are likely to be accomplices, blackmailers or withholding evidence because they've acquired it while doing something immoral. Plus, with just a few exceptions, any affection of a handsome man for a woman is false, usually motivated by money.
** %%** Possibly a case of WriteWhoYouKnow. Christie's first husband was a man like this; the marriage ended very badly.



* LoveMakesYouEvil: ''Oy.'' To list all examples would be ludicrous.
* LukeIAmYourFather: Turns up quite a lot, usually to provide a motive.
* MarketBasedTitle: Several of Christie's novels had their titles changed for their US editions. Some of the changes made sense (US readers wouldn't know what a mews was, so the collection ''Murder in the Mews'' was titled ''Dead Man's Mirror'' after a different story in the collection), while others seem superfluous (''Murder on the Orient Express'' was changed to ''Murder in the Calais Coach''). The editions currently in print have restored the original British titles.
** In the case of ''Murder on the Orient Express'', there was a real reason: a mystery novel by the title of ''Orient Express'' had come out in the US that same year. Oddly enough, that novel was itself renamed from its British title of ''Stamboul Train''.
* MarySue: InUniverse, several short stories have the main characters compare themselves to the iron-jawed supermen/wish they could have the beautiful heroines of the cheap novels they read. At the end, they recognize them for the fantasies that they are, and live happier lives for it.
** In the title character of ''The Manhood of Edward Robinson'' thoroughly enjoys his brush with high life but the main result of his adventure is that he finally asserts himself in his relationship with his fiancee - which she finds totally hot.

to:

* %%* LoveMakesYouEvil: ''Oy.'' To list all examples would be ludicrous.
* %%* LukeIAmYourFather: Turns up quite a lot, usually to provide a motive.
* MarketBasedTitle: Several of Christie's novels had their titles changed for their US editions. Some of the changes made sense (US readers wouldn't know what a mews was, so the collection ''Murder in the Mews'' was titled ''Dead Man's Mirror'' after a different story in the collection), while others seem superfluous (''Murder on the Orient Express'' was changed to ''Murder in the Calais Coach''). The editions currently in print have restored the original British titles.
** In the case of ''Murder on the Orient Express'', there was a real reason: a mystery novel by the title of ''Orient Express'' had come out in the US that same year. Oddly enough, that novel was itself renamed from its British title of ''Stamboul Train''.
*
%%* MarySue: InUniverse, several short stories have the main characters compare themselves to the iron-jawed supermen/wish they could have the beautiful heroines of the cheap novels they read. At the end, they recognize them for the fantasies that they are, and live happier lives for it.
** %%** In the title character of ''The Manhood of Edward Robinson'' thoroughly enjoys his brush with high life but the main result of his adventure is that he finally asserts himself in his relationship with his fiancee - which she finds totally hot.



* MetaTwist
* MurderByMistake: Subverted more often than not. Most of the time, the victim is the person that the murderer intended to kill, even if it appears otherwise. In fact, on multiple occasions, the "intended target" is actually the killer.
** Played straight in [[spoiler: ''Sparkling Cyanide''. Victor Drake intended to poison his cousin Iris to gain control of her fortune, but Iris's brother-in-law George ended up drinking from her glass instead of his own.]]
** An interesting variation in [[spoiler: ''Three Act Tragedy'' (the first murder)]] and [[spoiler: ''The ABC Murders'' (the last murder)]], where the murderers ''actually don't care whom they are murdering'' - and no, they're not precisely OmnicidalManiac kind of people.
* MurderSuicide: A common resolution.
* MysteryWriterDetective: Ariadne Oliver
* NeverFoundTheBody
* RedRightHand: [[spoiler:Josephine Leonides' general appearance]] in ''Crooked House''.
** [[spoiler: Subverted]] in ''Towards Zero''. A character tells a story of a child he once knew who he believes got away with a premeditated murder many years ago, who would now be a young adult. He believes this person was cunning, capable of extreme hate and without conscience... but he would know them again, thanks to a certain distinctive physical feature. Unfortunately he happens to [[spoiler: die early on without telling anyone what it is]] and, just so it's not too easy, [[spoiler: ''all'' the young adults who could be suspected have some unusual scar or quirk of appearance.]]

to:

* %%* MetaTwist
* MurderByMistake: Subverted more often than not. Most of the time, the victim is the person that the murderer intended to kill, even if it appears otherwise. MurderByMistake:
**
In fact, on multiple occasions, the "intended target" is actually the killer.
** Played straight in [[spoiler:
''Sparkling Cyanide''. [[spoiler: Victor Drake Drake]] intended to poison his cousin Iris to gain control of her fortune, but Iris's brother-in-law George ended up drinking from her glass instead of his own.]]
own.
** An interesting A variation occurs in [[spoiler: ''Three Act Tragedy'' (the first murder)]] and [[spoiler: ''The ABC Murders'' (the last murder)]], where ''Curtain''. [[spoiler:Barbara Franklin]] attempts to poison [[spoiler:her husband, Dr. Franklin]], but Hastings accidentally changed the murderers ''actually don't care whom they are murdering'' - and no, they're not precisely OmnicidalManiac kind arrangement of people.
*
the coffee cups by turning the table aside, causing [[spoiler:[[HoistByHisOwnPetard Barbara herself to drink the poisoned coffee]]]].
%%*
MurderSuicide: A common resolution.
* MysteryWriterDetective: Ariadne Oliver
*
%%* NeverFoundTheBody
* %%* RedRightHand: [[spoiler:Josephine Leonides' general appearance]] in ''Crooked House''.
** [[spoiler: Subverted]] in ''Towards Zero''. A character tells a story of a child he once knew who he believes got away with a premeditated murder many years ago, who would now be a young adult. He believes this person was cunning, capable of extreme hate and without conscience... but he would know them again, thanks to a certain distinctive physical feature. Unfortunately he happens to [[spoiler: die early on without telling anyone what it is]] and, just so it's not too easy, [[spoiler: ''all'' the young adults who could be suspected have some unusual scar or quirk of appearance.]]
House''.



* SympatheticMurderer
* TakingTheHeat
* TapOnTheHead: Multiple instances.
* TenLittleMurderVictims: TropeNamer

to:

* %%* SympatheticMurderer
* %%* TakingTheHeat
* %%* TapOnTheHead: Multiple instances.
* %%* TenLittleMurderVictims: TropeNamer



* {{Tontine}}: Several of her books rely on them.
* TooDumbToLive: Anyone who blackmails a murderer.
* TwistEnding

to:

* %%* {{Tontine}}: Several of her books rely on them.
* %%* TooDumbToLive: Anyone who blackmails a murderer.
* %%* TwistEnding



* {{Yandere}}: So ''very'' many. One of her most prominent yandere is Vera Claythorne from ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' who [[spoiler: is not ''the'' murderer, but [[AxCrazy can be just as insane]] as the actual murderer.]]

to:

* {{Yandere}}: So ''very'' many. {{Yandere}}:
**
One of her most prominent yandere example is Vera Claythorne from ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' who [[spoiler: is not ''the'' murderer, but [[AxCrazy [[spoiler:, while working as a governess, murdered a child in her care]] so that her lover can be just as insane]] as the actual murderer.]]become rich and free to marry her.
22nd Jul '16 10:14:16 AM Adept
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* The ''way'' too obvious suspect ([[TheUntwist who therefore of course won't turn out to be the real killer, now will they?]][[invoked]]) really ''was'' the killer after all, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Hollow]]'', ''[[spoiler:Towards Zero]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/CardsOnTheTable]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'', ''[[spoiler:Lord Edgware Dies]]'', ''[[spoiler:Hickory Dickory Dock]]'', ''[[spoiler:Why Didn't They Ask Evans?]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Murder at the Vicarage]]'', in a way ''[[spoiler:Ordeal by Innocence]]'', [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''[[spoiler:The Love Detectives]]'').
* [[EverybodyDidIt everyone was guilty]], (''[[spoiler:Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress]]'')
* [[NarratorAllAlong the narrator was guilty]], (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd]]'', partly ''[[spoiler:The Man in the Brown Suit]]'', ''[[spoiler:Endless Night]]'', "[[spoiler:The Affair at the Bungalow]]")
* [[DetectiveMole one of the sleuths investigating the mystery was guilty]], (''[[spoiler:Hercule Poirot's Christmas]]'', ''[[spoiler:{{Literature/Curtain}}]]'', ''[[spoiler: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd]]'', ''[[spoiler:Three Act Tragedy]]'', ''[[spoiler:The ABC Murders]]'', ''[[spoiler:Death in the Clouds]]'')
** the guilty party was impersonating the detective, ("[[spoiler:The Oracle at Delphi]]", "[[spoiler:The Erymanthian Boar]]", ''[[spoiler:Three Blind Mice]]'', partly ''[[spoiler:The Secret Of Chimneys]]'', "[[spoiler:Greenshaw's Folly]]")
* one of the murder victims was guilty, (''[[spoiler:Literature/AndThenThereWereNone]]'', ''[[spoiler:{{Literature/Curtain}}]]'')
* the supposed intended target was guilty, (''[[spoiler:Peril at End House]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMirrorCrackdFromSideToSide]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/AMurderIsAnnounced]]'', ''[[spoiler:Crooked House]]'', and in a ''particularly'' twisted way, [[spoiler:Wasp's Nest]]")
* a child was guilty, (''[[spoiler:Crooked House]]'')
* the murders looked like the work of an AxCrazy killer, but the murderer was not crazy, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheABCMurders]]'', ''[[spoiler:A Pocket Full of Rye]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMovingFinger]]'', ''[[spoiler:Easy to Kill]]'')
* the initial victim was a distraction, and the major intended victim was one of those killed later, ([[spoiler:''Three-Act Tragedy'']], [[spoiler:''The ABC Murders'']])
* there was no murderer at all, ("[[spoiler:Murder in the Mews]]")
* the murder took place in the narrator's head only ("[[spoiler:The Affair at the Bungalow]]")
* the SecretCircleOfSecrets are the ''good'' guys (''[[spoiler:The Seven Dials Mystery]]'')

to:

* The ''way'' too obvious suspect ([[TheUntwist who therefore of course won't turn out to be the real killer, now will they?]][[invoked]]) really ''was'' the killer after all, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Hollow]]'', ''[[spoiler:Towards Zero]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/CardsOnTheTable]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'', ''[[spoiler:Lord Edgware Dies]]'', ''[[spoiler:Hickory Dickory Dock]]'', ''[[spoiler:Why Didn't They Ask Evans?]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Murder at the Vicarage]]'', in a way ''[[spoiler:Ordeal by Innocence]]'', [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''[[spoiler:The Love Detectives]]'').
all.
* [[EverybodyDidIt everyone was guilty]], (''[[spoiler:Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress]]'')
guilty]].
* [[NarratorAllAlong the narrator was guilty]], (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd]]'', partly ''[[spoiler:The Man in the Brown Suit]]'', ''[[spoiler:Endless Night]]'', "[[spoiler:The Affair at the Bungalow]]")
guilty]].
* [[DetectiveMole one of the sleuths investigating the mystery was guilty]], (''[[spoiler:Hercule Poirot's Christmas]]'', ''[[spoiler:{{Literature/Curtain}}]]'', ''[[spoiler: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd]]'', ''[[spoiler:Three Act Tragedy]]'', ''[[spoiler:The ABC Murders]]'', ''[[spoiler:Death in the Clouds]]'')
guilty]].
** the guilty party was impersonating the detective, ("[[spoiler:The Oracle at Delphi]]", "[[spoiler:The Erymanthian Boar]]", ''[[spoiler:Three Blind Mice]]'', partly ''[[spoiler:The Secret Of Chimneys]]'', "[[spoiler:Greenshaw's Folly]]")
detective.
* one of the murder victims was guilty, (''[[spoiler:Literature/AndThenThereWereNone]]'', ''[[spoiler:{{Literature/Curtain}}]]'')
* the supposed intended target was guilty, (''[[spoiler:Peril at End House]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMirrorCrackdFromSideToSide]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/AMurderIsAnnounced]]'', ''[[spoiler:Crooked House]]'', and in a ''particularly'' twisted way, [[spoiler:Wasp's Nest]]")
* a child was guilty, (''[[spoiler:Crooked House]]'')
guilty.
* the murders looked like the work of an AxCrazy killer, but the murderer was not crazy, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheABCMurders]]'', ''[[spoiler:A Pocket Full of Rye]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMovingFinger]]'', ''[[spoiler:Easy to Kill]]'')
crazy.
* the initial victim was a distraction, and the major intended victim was one of those killed later, ([[spoiler:''Three-Act Tragedy'']], [[spoiler:''The ABC Murders'']])
later.
* there was no murderer at all, ("[[spoiler:Murder in the Mews]]")
all.
* the murder took place in the narrator's head only ("[[spoiler:The Affair at the Bungalow]]")
only.
* the SecretCircleOfSecrets are the ''good'' guys (''[[spoiler:The Seven Dials Mystery]]'')guys.
19th Jul '16 9:39:54 PM Adept
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* The ''way'' too obvious suspect ([[TheUntwist who therefore of course won't turn out to be the real killer, now will they?]][[invoked]]) really ''was'' the killer after all, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Hollow]]'', ''[[spoiler:Towards Zero]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/CardsOnTheTable]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'',''[[spoiler:Lord Edgware Dies]]'', ''[[spoiler:Hickory Dickory Dock]]'', ''[[spoiler:Why Didn't They Ask Evans?]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Murder at the Vicarage]]'', in a way ''[[spoiler:Ordeal by Innocence]]'', [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''[[spoiler:The Love Detectives]]'').

to:

* The ''way'' too obvious suspect ([[TheUntwist who therefore of course won't turn out to be the real killer, now will they?]][[invoked]]) really ''was'' the killer after all, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Hollow]]'', ''[[spoiler:Towards Zero]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/CardsOnTheTable]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'',''[[spoiler:Lord ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'', ''[[spoiler:Lord Edgware Dies]]'', ''[[spoiler:Hickory Dickory Dock]]'', ''[[spoiler:Why Didn't They Ask Evans?]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Murder at the Vicarage]]'', in a way ''[[spoiler:Ordeal by Innocence]]'', [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''[[spoiler:The Love Detectives]]'').


Added DiffLines:

** ''Literature/ThreeActTragedy'' (1934)
19th Jul '16 12:24:14 AM Adept
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* The ''way'' too obvious suspect ([[TheUntwist who therefore of course won't turn out to be the real killer, now will they?]][[invoked]]) really ''was'' the killer after all, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Hollow]]'', ''[[spoiler:Towards Zero]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/CardsOnTheTable]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'', ''[[spoiler:Hickory Dickory Dock]]'', ''[[spoiler:Why Didn't They Ask Evans?]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Murder at the Vicarage]]'', in a way ''[[spoiler:Ordeal by Innocence]]'', [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''[[spoiler:The Love Detectives]]'').

to:

* The ''way'' too obvious suspect ([[TheUntwist who therefore of course won't turn out to be the real killer, now will they?]][[invoked]]) really ''was'' the killer after all, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Hollow]]'', ''[[spoiler:Towards Zero]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/CardsOnTheTable]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'',''[[spoiler:Lord Edgware Dies]]'', ''[[spoiler:Hickory Dickory Dock]]'', ''[[spoiler:Why Didn't They Ask Evans?]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Murder at the Vicarage]]'', in a way ''[[spoiler:Ordeal by Innocence]]'', [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''[[spoiler:The Love Detectives]]'').
18th Jul '16 11:08:30 PM Adept
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* The ''way'' too obvious suspect ([[TheUntwist who therefore of course won't turn out to be the real killer, now will they?]]) really ''was'' the killer after all, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Hollow]]'', ''[[spoiler:Towards Zero]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/CardsOnTheTable]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'', ''[[spoiler:Hickory Dickory Dock]]'', ''[[spoiler:Why Didn't They Ask Evans?]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Murder at the Vicarage]]'', in a way ''[[spoiler:Ordeal by Innocence]]'', [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''[[spoiler:The Love Detectives]]'').

to:

* The ''way'' too obvious suspect ([[TheUntwist who therefore of course won't turn out to be the real killer, now will they?]]) they?]][[invoked]]) really ''was'' the killer after all, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Hollow]]'', ''[[spoiler:Towards Zero]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/CardsOnTheTable]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/DeathOnTheNile]]'', ''[[spoiler:Hickory Dickory Dock]]'', ''[[spoiler:Why Didn't They Ask Evans?]]'', ''[[spoiler:The Murder at the Vicarage]]'', in a way ''[[spoiler:Ordeal by Innocence]]'', [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in ''[[spoiler:The Love Detectives]]'').



* the murders looked like the work of an AxCrazy killer, but the murderer was not crazy,(''[[spoiler:Literature/TheABCMurders]]'', ''[[spoiler:A Pocket Full of Rye]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMovingFinger]]'', ''([[spoiler:Easy to Kill]]'')

to:

* the murders looked like the work of an AxCrazy killer, but the murderer was not crazy,(''[[spoiler:Literature/TheABCMurders]]'', crazy, (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheABCMurders]]'', ''[[spoiler:A Pocket Full of Rye]]'', ''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMovingFinger]]'', ''([[spoiler:Easy ''[[spoiler:Easy to Kill]]'')
18th Jul '16 11:08:30 PM Adept
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