History Creator / AgathaChristie

5th Feb '16 4:49:02 PM NotThisThing
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** She never had a Jew as ''the'' criminal (at least, as far as this troper is aware). Rather, she unthinkingly drew on the casually anti-Semitic stereotypes that were accepted in British society of her day. Shortly before the events that led to WWII, she met an actual hardcore anti-Semite and found the experience so disturbing that she went so far as to make a Jew, Sebastian Levine, one of her main sympathetic leads in the 1930 novel "Giant's Bread" (though humorously enough, she still made him a stereotypical Jew-- it was just a highly positive portrayal, making this more a subversion than an aversion). She also had the character of Oliver Manders in "Murder in Three Acts", published in 1936, who is another flat-out aversion. Oliver is written as distinctively attractive, though also distinctively "Jewish" and "other", but still ends up as the "good" man in the romantic triangle and gets the girl. ...But then again, "The Hollow" came out in 1946 and has perhaps Christie's worst Jewish character in the form of an irritating boss, the "vitriolic little Jewess" with the "awful corn shrike voice", who was a straight-up portrayal of this trope... It seems that Christie was equally comfortable casting Jews in positive and negative roles. It was just that her construction of Jewish characters (and all non-British characters, really) tended to pull on awkward and dated stereotypes for their assembly.
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** She never had a Jew as ''the'' criminal (at least, as far as this troper is aware). Rather, she unthinkingly drew on the casually anti-Semitic stereotypes that were accepted in British society of her day. Shortly before the events that led to WWII, she met an actual hardcore anti-Semite and found the experience so disturbing that she went so far as to make a Jew, Sebastian Levine, one of her main sympathetic leads in the 1930 novel "Giant's Bread" (though humorously enough, she still made him a stereotypical Jew-- it was just a highly positive portrayal, making this more a subversion than an aversion). She also had the character of Oliver Manders in "Murder in Three Acts", ''Three Act Tragedy'', published in 1936, who is another flat-out aversion. Oliver is written as distinctively attractive, though also distinctively "Jewish" and "other", but still ends up as the "good" man in the romantic triangle and gets the girl. ...But then again, "The Hollow" ''The Hollow'' came out in 1946 and has perhaps Christie's worst Jewish character in the form of an irritating boss, the "vitriolic little Jewess" with the "awful corn shrike voice", who was a straight-up portrayal of this trope... It seems that Christie was equally comfortable casting Jews in positive and negative roles. It was just that her construction of Jewish characters (and all non-British characters, really) tended to pull on awkward and dated stereotypes for their assembly.
12th Jan '16 11:01:18 AM AndIntroducingALeg
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** Completely averted by ''Death Comes As The End'', which is set in Ancient Egypt.
10th Jan '16 8:38:24 AM AndIntroducingALeg
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Christie also wrote 16 novels which did not feature any of her series detectives. These ranged from traditional mysteries with one-shot detectives to {{Thriller}}s which placed more emphasis on action than detection. The latter were almost universally the most poorly received of Christie's works, while one of the former, ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'', is widely regarded as one of her best, even ''the'' best.
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Christie also wrote 16 novels which did not feature any of her series detectives. These ranged from traditional mysteries with one-shot detectives to {{Thriller}}s which placed more emphasis on action than detection. The latter were almost universally the most poorly received of Christie's works, while one of the former, ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'', is widely regarded as one of her best, even ''the'' best. best. Six of her novels, which are usually classed as {{Romance}}s, were written under the pseudonym Mary Wesmacott.
10th Jan '16 6:20:52 AM AndIntroducingALeg
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* ADayInTheLimelight: After a number of minor, supporting, and cameo roles, Superintendent Battle gets to be main detective in ''Towards Zero''.
28th Dec '15 2:28:27 AM morenohijazo
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* InvisibleWriting: Two short stories (one featuring HerculePoirot and one MissMarple), involve rich eccentrics writing their {{will}} in Invisible Ink, and challenging the heirs to find it.
27th Dec '15 1:57:08 AM Doug86
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Christie also wrote 16 novels which did not feature any of her series detectives. These ranged from traditional mysteries with one-shot detectives to {{Thriller}}s which placed more emphasis on action than detection. The latter were almost universally the most poorly received of Christie's works, while one of the former, ''AndThenThereWereNone'', is widely regarded as one of her best, even ''the'' best.
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Christie also wrote 16 novels which did not feature any of her series detectives. These ranged from traditional mysteries with one-shot detectives to {{Thriller}}s which placed more emphasis on action than detection. The latter were almost universally the most poorly received of Christie's works, while one of the former, ''AndThenThereWereNone'', ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'', is widely regarded as one of her best, even ''the'' best.

* ThemeNaming: Christie was fond of titling her works after nursery rhymes. Novel examples include ''AndThenThereWereNone''; ''One, Two, Buckle My Shoe''; ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs''; ''Crooked House''; ''Hickory Dickory Dock''; and ''A Pocket Full of Rye''. Short stories include "Sing a Song of Sixpence", "Four and Twenty Blackbirds", "How Does Your Garden Grow", and "Three Blind Mice". Note that each of the first three lines of "Sing a Song of Sixpence" has provided the title of a work.
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* ThemeNaming: Christie was fond of titling her works after nursery rhymes. Novel examples include ''AndThenThereWereNone''; ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone''; ''One, Two, Buckle My Shoe''; ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs''; ''Crooked House''; ''Hickory Dickory Dock''; and ''A Pocket Full of Rye''. Short stories include "Sing a Song of Sixpence", "Four and Twenty Blackbirds", "How Does Your Garden Grow", and "Three Blind Mice". Note that each of the first three lines of "Sing a Song of Sixpence" has provided the title of a work.
11th Dec '15 4:21:03 PM Kitchen90
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Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie (1890-1976) was the Queen of the classic mystery, ranked with Creator/ArthurConanDoyle as the greatest mystery writer of all time. Her stories are elaborately plotted puzzle pieces, full of false identities and faked deaths. She enjoyed a very long career; her first novel, ''The Mysterious Affair at Styles'', was published in 1920, while her final novel, ''Sleeping Murder'', was published posthumously in 1976. Among the best-selling authors of all time[[note]]The ''Guinness Book'' says she's sold more books than any other individual author. If you count shorter works, Creator/WilliamShakespeare takes the lead. If corporations are invited, the collected works of Creator/WaltDisney Productions top the list. Regardless, she's sold three billion copies in over 100 languages[[/note]].
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Dame Agatha [[KnightFever Dame]] '''Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie (1890-1976) Christie''' (September 15th 1890 -- January 12th 1976) was the Queen of the classic mystery, ranked with Creator/ArthurConanDoyle as the greatest mystery writer of all time. Her stories are elaborately plotted puzzle pieces, full of false identities and faked deaths. She enjoyed a very long career; her first novel, ''The Mysterious Affair at Styles'', was published in 1920, while her final novel, ''Sleeping Murder'', was published posthumously in 1976. Among the best-selling authors of all time[[note]]The ''Guinness Book'' says she's sold more books than any other individual author. If you count shorter works, Creator/WilliamShakespeare takes the lead. If corporations are invited, the collected works of Creator/WaltDisney Productions top the list. Regardless, she's sold three billion copies in over 100 languages[[/note]].
11th Dec '15 8:50:08 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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The Queen of the classic mystery, ranked with Creator/ArthurConanDoyle as the greatest mystery writer of all time. Her stories are elaborately plotted puzzle pieces, full of false identities and faked deaths. She enjoyed a very long career; her first novel, ''The Mysterious Affair at Styles'', was published in 1920, while her final novel, ''Sleeping Murder'', was published posthumously in 1976. Among the best-selling authors of all time[[note]]The ''Guinness Book'' says she's sold more books than any other individual author. If you count shorter works, Creator/WilliamShakespeare takes the lead. If corporations are invited, the collected works of Creator/WaltDisney Productions top the list. Regardless, she's sold three billion copies in over 100 languages[[/note]].
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The Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie (1890-1976) was the Queen of the classic mystery, ranked with Creator/ArthurConanDoyle as the greatest mystery writer of all time. Her stories are elaborately plotted puzzle pieces, full of false identities and faked deaths. She enjoyed a very long career; her first novel, ''The Mysterious Affair at Styles'', was published in 1920, while her final novel, ''Sleeping Murder'', was published posthumously in 1976. Among the best-selling authors of all time[[note]]The ''Guinness Book'' says she's sold more books than any other individual author. If you count shorter works, Creator/WilliamShakespeare takes the lead. If corporations are invited, the collected works of Creator/WaltDisney Productions top the list. Regardless, she's sold three billion copies in over 100 languages[[/note]].

* ''Literature/HerculePoirot'', a retired Belgian police detective turned P.I. Fastidiously neat, he pretended to be a FunnyForeigner in order to put his clients and suspects off their guard. Agatha Christie herself eventually tired of the character, but since fans enjoyed him, she continued to write Poirot stories. He appeared in 33 novels and 51 short stories. * ''[[Literature/MissMarple Miss Jane Marple]]''. Seemingly a fluffy old spinster, her mind was as sharp as her knitting needles; having lived in small towns her whole life, nothing about human nature ever surprised her. She appeared in 12 novels and 20 short stories. * ''Literature/TommyAndTuppence Beresford'', a husband and wife team. Their adventures were more like spy novels than straight mysteries, though they did contain elements of classic detective novels. They appeared in five books: four novels and a short story collection, ''Partners in Crime''.
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* ''Literature/HerculePoirot'', *''Literature/HerculePoirot'', a retired Belgian police detective turned P.I. Fastidiously neat, he pretended to be a FunnyForeigner in order to put his clients and suspects off their guard. Agatha Christie herself eventually tired of the character, but since fans enjoyed him, she continued to write Poirot stories. He appeared in 33 novels and 51 short stories. * ''[[Literature/MissMarple *''[[Literature/MissMarple Miss Jane Marple]]''. Seemingly a fluffy old spinster, her mind was as sharp as her knitting needles; having lived in small towns her whole life, nothing about human nature ever surprised her. She appeared in 12 novels and 20 short stories. * ''Literature/TommyAndTuppence *''Literature/TommyAndTuppence Beresford'', a husband and wife team. Their adventures were more like spy novels than straight mysteries, though they did contain elements of classic detective novels. They appeared in five books: four novels and a short story collection, ''Partners in Crime''.
10th Dec '15 8:09:25 AM ZarbiNerada
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* the murders looked like the work of an AxCrazy killer, but the murderer was not crazy,(''[[spoiler:Literature/TheABCMurders]]''), (''[[spoiler:A Pocket Full of Rye]]''), (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMovingFinger]]'', ''[[spoiler:Easy to Kill]]'')
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* the murders looked like the work of an AxCrazy killer, but the murderer was not crazy,(''[[spoiler:Literature/TheABCMurders]]''), (''[[spoiler:A Pocket Full of Rye]]''), (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMovingFinger]]'', ''[[spoiler:Easy (''[[spoiler:Literature/TheMovingFinger]]''), ''([[spoiler:Easy to Kill]]'')
10th Dec '15 8:08:09 AM ZarbiNerada
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* the SecretSocietyOfSecrets are the ''good'' guys (''[[spoiler:The Seven Dials Mystery]]'')
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* the SecretSocietyOfSecrets SecretCircleOfSecrets are the ''good'' guys (''[[spoiler:The Seven Dials Mystery]]'')
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