History ConservationOfNinjutsu / VideoGames

9th Aug '17 7:00:52 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' plays this trope straight by the end of the game. To slow Link down, [[BigBad Ghirahim]] summons his whole army of minions, most of whom die in one hit by this point in the game. Ghirahim himself, and the BiggerBad that serves as the FinalBoss, are a different story.

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* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' plays this trope straight by the end of the game. To slow Link down, [[BigBad [[TheHeavy Ghirahim]] summons his whole army of minions, most of whom die in one hit by this point in the game. Ghirahim himself, himself and the BiggerBad that serves as the FinalBoss, FinalBoss are a different story.
1st Aug '17 5:22:37 AM AnotherDuck
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1st Aug '17 5:22:18 AM AnotherDuck
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* AI's in RTS games suffer from this, especially when they are NotPlayingFairWithResources. As too many units or even too many AI's clumped together against a single Human player adds so much individual commands that the computer would lag. Forcing the AI to make stupid decisions, turning what is known to be an unstoppable force into cannon fodder in moments.
1st Aug '17 5:21:57 AM AnotherDuck
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* A MagicAIsMagicA example is the ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series. In the face of a horde of aliens that are both physically and technologically superior to anything Humanity has to offer, the Master Chief and the other Spartans are the only humans that are physically strong, technologically augmented, and technically skilled enough to take down thousands of 7-and-over-foot tall alien killing machines. The legendary status of the Spartans is such that the military refuses to officially acknowledge their deaths, instead listing them as Missing In Action.

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* A MagicAIsMagicA example is the ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series.series:
** A MagicAIsMagicA example.
In the face of a horde of aliens that are both physically and technologically superior to anything Humanity has to offer, the Master Chief and the other Spartans are the only humans that are physically strong, technologically augmented, and technically skilled enough to take down thousands of 7-and-over-foot tall alien killing machines. The legendary status of the Spartans is such that the military refuses to officially acknowledge their deaths, instead listing them as Missing In Action.



* No ninjas or robots either and applying to main characters, but still: In ''Franchise/DevilMayCry 3'', Dante or Vergil alone can use their full powers in the first phase of the fight against Arkham. When the second phase rolls in, bringing Vergil or Dante (respectively according to character used) with it, the player loses his Style-based moves and Devil Trigger transformation, while the interloper also cannot fight at full power.

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* ''Franchise/DevilMayCry 3'':
**
No ninjas or robots either and applying to main characters, but still: In ''Franchise/DevilMayCry 3'', Dante or Vergil alone can use their full powers in the first phase of the fight against Arkham. When the second phase rolls in, bringing Vergil or Dante (respectively according to character used) with it, the player loses his Style-based moves and Devil Trigger transformation, while the interloper also cannot fight at full power.



* In the ''VideoGame/TerminatorSalvation'' video game, the player kills tons of terminator robots with grenades, M16, shotguns, pistols and even by punching them. This is in contrast to the movies where bullets/{{RPG}}s/exploding gas tankers/ firetrucks did almost nothing to the lone pursuing robot.
** Then again, these are model T-600s, not the 800s and higher seen in the movies. Further, each T-600 you face takes a ''lot'' of punishment to bring down, even if every round hits their weakpoint, and if you don't have cover, you ''will'' be shredded by their miniguns. The first few encounters you just don't have enough firepower to bring them down, and you're forced to run the hell away.



* In the multiplayer shooter ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' the Spy, one of the nine character classes, has the potential to singlehandedly wreak havoc across the entire enemy team. A lone Spy can cripple defenses, take out high priority targets and even ninja-capture objectives when no-one's looking, all while causing paranoia among enemy teammates. Multiple Spies, on the other hand, don't work so well: if one Spy messes up, the enemy team will be alerted and will plan accordingly, making life much more difficult for the other Spies. They also tend to interfere with each other's plans, particularly when trying to take down the same target or Sentry Gun nest. When a team has three Spies or more, chances are high none of them is doing well at all, which in turn hampers the others' effectiveness, especially as Spies aren't cut out for head-on combat.
** Really, a good player of almost any class (barring TheMedic, who requires others to be effective) can be this.

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* In the multiplayer shooter ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' the ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'':
** The
Spy, one of the nine character classes, has the potential to singlehandedly wreak havoc across the entire enemy team. A lone Spy can cripple defenses, take out high priority targets and even ninja-capture objectives when no-one's looking, all while causing paranoia among enemy teammates. Multiple Spies, on the other hand, don't work so well: if one Spy messes up, the enemy team will be alerted and will plan accordingly, making life much more difficult for the other Spies. They also tend to interfere with each other's plans, particularly when trying to take down the same target or Sentry Gun nest. When a team has three Spies or more, chances are high none of them is doing well at all, which in turn hampers the others' effectiveness, especially as Spies aren't cut out for head-on combat.
** Really, a good player of almost any class (barring TheMedic, who requires others to be effective) can be this.
combat.



* In ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'' and ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'', large armies of mooks present little more challenge than a single mook, except that they take more hits. But dodging/countering works the same. Just beware guys with [[NeverBringAKnifeToAFistFight knives and guns]], while pummeling one to twenty men with baseball bats or their own fists for protection. On the other hand, when only one guy shows up in a room, you can bet it's either a BossBattle or a BossInMookClothing.
** More enemies can even make a fight easier because more enemies means more options. Don't wanna deal with the toughest enemy in the room? Just punch 5 easy guys once to build up your combo so you can use an instant takedown on the scary guy.

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* In ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'' and ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'', large armies of mooks present little more challenge than a single mook, except that they take more hits. But dodging/countering works the same. Just beware guys with [[NeverBringAKnifeToAFistFight knives and guns]], while pummeling one to twenty men with baseball bats or their own fists for protection. On the other hand, when only one guy shows up in a room, you can bet it's either a BossBattle or a BossInMookClothing.
**
BossInMookClothing. More enemies can even make a fight easier because more enemies means more options. Don't wanna deal with the toughest enemy in the room? Just punch 5 easy guys once to build up your combo so you can use an instant takedown on the scary guy.



* ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'' actually has this as a player's power. The more enemies that are nearby (Capped at 10 to balance things a little), the stronger a character possessing such a power will be in battle against all of the enemies. Also carries over to a few of the optional powers accessible to anyone, which can improve offense, defense or other stats across a whole team.

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* ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'' ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'':
** This game
actually has this as a player's power. The more enemies that are nearby (Capped (capped at 10 to balance things a little), the stronger a character possessing such a power will be in battle against all of the enemies. Also carries over to a few of the optional powers accessible to anyone, which can improve offense, defense or other stats across a whole team.



* '' VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' includes one zone, Lake Wintergrasp, dedicated to world (i.e. not instanced) PvP. In an effort to make it more fun on servers where one faction or the other is underpopulated, it features a mechanic called Tenacity that buffs whichever side has fewer people - the greater the disparity, the stronger the buff.
** Notably, the Tenacity buff, was hilariously weak as it did nothing against CC effects, so if 3 or 4 people with 20 stacks of tenacity (full power, 500% EVERYTHING) encountered the other faction's main group... they got obliterated very easily, averting this trope.

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* '' VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'':
** The game
includes one zone, Lake Wintergrasp, dedicated to world (i.e. not instanced) PvP. In an effort to make it more fun on servers where one faction or the other is underpopulated, it features a mechanic called Tenacity that buffs whichever side has fewer people - the greater the disparity, the stronger the buff.
** Notably,
buff. However, the Tenacity buff, buff was hilariously weak as it did nothing against CC effects, so if 3 or 4 people with 20 stacks of tenacity (full power, 500% EVERYTHING) encountered the other faction's main group... they got obliterated very easily, averting this trope.



* In ''{{VideoGame/Diablo}} 2'', this works against the players. The more players are playing in the same game at the same time, the more powerful the monsters become -- thereby making each player proportionately weaker than if he was playing on his own.
** With a good team setup, synergy means the players still come out ahead in that race.
* In ''VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar'', default unit sizes are subject to this rule, the extreme being the sword master that's just one guy that can take on dozens of lesser men.
** The game also has two kinds of ninja units:

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* In ''{{VideoGame/Diablo}} 2'', this works against the players. The more players are playing in the same game at the same time, the more powerful the monsters become -- thereby making each player proportionately weaker than if he was playing on his own.
''VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar'':
** With a good team setup, synergy means the players still come out ahead in that race.
* In ''VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar'', default
Default unit sizes are subject to this rule, the extreme being the sword master that's just one guy that can take on dozens of lesser men.
** The game also has two kinds of ninja units:units, on each side of the trope:



* In ''VideoGame/RomeTotalWar'', bringing large numbers of poorly-trained, poorly-equipped and unmotivated soldiers to a battle, with the intention of crushing the enemy through sheer weight of numbers, was not always wise. If these men were attacked and routed by the enemy, their fleeing would have a highly deleterious effect on the morale of your remaining troops, rendering them much more susceptible to breaking under pressure.
** In all the Total War series a large army can be hard to properly control. Most notable in ''[[VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar Medival 2]]'' when a single unit of properly micromanaged heavy cav can devistate thousands of pesants. It is just too hard for a human opponent to reorganise their line to take the charge properly.

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* In ''VideoGame/RomeTotalWar'', bringing large numbers of poorly-trained, poorly-equipped and unmotivated soldiers to a battle, with the intention of crushing the enemy through sheer weight of numbers, was not always wise. If these men were attacked and routed by the enemy, their fleeing would have a highly deleterious effect on the morale of your remaining troops, rendering them much more susceptible to breaking under pressure.
**
In all the Total War ''VideoGame/TotalWar'' series a large army can be hard to properly control. Most notable in ''[[VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar Medival 2]]'' II]]'' when a single unit of properly micromanaged heavy cav cavalry can devistate devastate thousands of pesants.peasants. It is just too hard for a human opponent to reorganise their line to take the charge properly.



* Applies to ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' as well. Trainers with a five or six-member party are usually Bug Catchers or Fishermen, and will use lots of lower-leveled Pokémon, or weaker Pokémon in general (like Caterpie and Magikarp). A trainer with only one Pokémon will be substantially higher-leveled.

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* Applies to ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' as well. well.
**
Trainers with a five or six-member party are usually Bug Catchers or Fishermen, and will use lots of lower-leveled Pokémon, or weaker Pokémon in general (like Caterpie and Magikarp). A trainer with only one Pokémon will be substantially higher-leveled.



* The GrandFinale of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' has the capital city of Ferelden attacked by Darkspawn. When you get inside the city, you'll find that you're vastly outnumbered, but are only fighting against grunt versions of the normal darkspawn, meaning that they go down in one or two hits to balance things out.
** Although there ''are'' EliteMooks, mixed in with them. If you're trying to kill the Darkspawn General based in the alienage, you will have to fight through a ZergRush of EliteMooks, at least on higher difficulties.

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* The GrandFinale of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' has the capital city of Ferelden attacked by Darkspawn. When you get inside the city, you'll find that you're vastly outnumbered, but are only fighting against grunt versions of the normal darkspawn, meaning that they go down in one or two hits to balance things out.
**
out. Although there ''are'' EliteMooks, mixed in with them. If you're trying to kill the Darkspawn General based in the alienage, you will have to fight through a ZergRush of EliteMooks, at least on higher difficulties.



* In VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}, the Splatfest that took place on Halloween in North America was Ninjas vs Pirates. Ninjas outnumbered Pirates 72 to 28 percent, but ultimately lost the Splatfest. A later Splatfest in Europe pitted Ninja versus Barbarians, and the Ninja lost this one under nearly identical circumstances.
** The reason for this is because while Ninjas were vastly more popular, the win rate counted for ''six times'' the points popularity did. This meant that the Pirates didn't have to win much more than the Ninjas to win the Splatfest, even with the massive disparity in popularity. Adding to this was the fact that many matches on the Ninja side ended up being Ninja vs Ninja, because there were simply that much more of them. Splatfest matches pitting a team against itself didn't count towards the team's win rate, meaning that many of the better players on the Ninja side ended up leveling their Splatfest rank to King/Queen and then quitting without contributing towards their team's win rate all that much, while the worse players ended up playing more matches against Pirates. This is similar to what happened in the previous Splatfest, Planes vs Cars, with Planes being the more popular team, and Cars having more wins and taking the Splatfest.
25th Jun '17 1:03:55 AM EternalNothingness
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* This can happen in [[CompetitiveMultiplayer online multiplayer FPS games]] such as ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' and ''VideoGame/Battlefield'' when small teams are outnumbered by large contingents of players from the other team. While objective based game modes can be easily thwarted by numerical superiority, Team Death Matches tend to play out the opposite way. In, for example, a 1v12 ''VideoGame/Battlefield3'' TDM, the severely outnumbered player may well take down two or more players before he/she is spotted by the other team and eliminated - at which point he/she spawns randomly somewhere else on the map. This results in the lone ninja gaining substantially more kills in the target rich environment than the team of regular ninjas can simply fighting one player.

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* This can happen in [[CompetitiveMultiplayer online multiplayer FPS games]] such as ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' and ''VideoGame/Battlefield'' ''Battlefield'' when small teams are outnumbered by large contingents of players from the other team. While objective based game modes can be easily thwarted by numerical superiority, Team Death Matches tend to play out the opposite way. In, for example, a 1v12 ''VideoGame/Battlefield3'' TDM, the severely outnumbered player may well take down two or more players before he/she is spotted by the other team and eliminated - at which point he/she spawns randomly somewhere else on the map. This results in the lone ninja gaining substantially more kills in the target rich environment than the team of regular ninjas can simply fighting one player.
25th Jun '17 12:57:13 AM EternalNothingness
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* This can happen in [[CompetitiveMultiplayer online multiplayer FPS games]] such as ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' and ''VideoGame/Battlefield'' when small teams are outnumbered by large contingents of players from the other team. While objective based game modes can be easily thwarted by numerical superiority, Team Death Matches tend to play out the opposite way. In, for example, a 1v12 [[VideoGame/Battlefield3]] TDM, the severely outnumbered player may well take down two or more players before he/she is spotted by the other team and eliminated - at which point he/she spawns randomly somewhere else on the map. This results in the lone ninja gaining substantially more kills in the target rich environment than the team of regular ninjas can simply fighting one player.

to:

* This can happen in [[CompetitiveMultiplayer online multiplayer FPS games]] such as ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' and ''VideoGame/Battlefield'' when small teams are outnumbered by large contingents of players from the other team. While objective based game modes can be easily thwarted by numerical superiority, Team Death Matches tend to play out the opposite way. In, for example, a 1v12 [[VideoGame/Battlefield3]] ''VideoGame/Battlefield3'' TDM, the severely outnumbered player may well take down two or more players before he/she is spotted by the other team and eliminated - at which point he/she spawns randomly somewhere else on the map. This results in the lone ninja gaining substantially more kills in the target rich environment than the team of regular ninjas can simply fighting one player.
25th Jun '17 12:56:17 AM EternalNothingness
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* This can happen in online multiplayer FPS games such as Call of Duty and Battlefield when small teams are outnumbered by large contingents of players from the other team. While objective based game modes can be easily thwarted by numerical superiority, Team Death Matches tend to play out the opposite way. In, for example, a 1v12 Battlefield 3 TDM, the severely outnumbered player may well take down two or more players before he/she is spotted by the other team and eliminated - at which point he/she spawns randomly somewhere else on the map. This results in the lone ninja gaining substantially more kills in the target rich environment than the team of regular ninjas can simply fighting one player.

to:

* This can happen in [[CompetitiveMultiplayer online multiplayer FPS games games]] such as Call of Duty ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' and Battlefield ''VideoGame/Battlefield'' when small teams are outnumbered by large contingents of players from the other team. While objective based game modes can be easily thwarted by numerical superiority, Team Death Matches tend to play out the opposite way. In, for example, a 1v12 Battlefield 3 [[VideoGame/Battlefield3]] TDM, the severely outnumbered player may well take down two or more players before he/she is spotted by the other team and eliminated - at which point he/she spawns randomly somewhere else on the map. This results in the lone ninja gaining substantially more kills in the target rich environment than the team of regular ninjas can simply fighting one player.
20th May '17 4:38:04 PM nombretomado
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* ''{{Vindictus}}'' probably has the most realistic use of this trope. Enemies use a variety of tactics, including mass mob attack, and single flanking and circling attacks. When enemies do attack in mobs, they predictably cause a lot of [[FriendlyFireIndex collateral damage]], getting in each other's way as one would normally expect. This is even true for [[DualBoss multiple boss missions]]. In fact, on the Gnoll Chieftain mission, the standard tactic is to keep running from the boss for the first few minutes of the fight, to allow his wild attacks to take out all his mooks before fighting him.

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* ''{{Vindictus}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Vindictus}}'' probably has the most realistic use of this trope. Enemies use a variety of tactics, including mass mob attack, and single flanking and circling attacks. When enemies do attack in mobs, they predictably cause a lot of [[FriendlyFireIndex collateral damage]], getting in each other's way as one would normally expect. This is even true for [[DualBoss multiple boss missions]]. In fact, on the Gnoll Chieftain mission, the standard tactic is to keep running from the boss for the first few minutes of the fight, to allow his wild attacks to take out all his mooks before fighting him.
17th May '17 9:05:39 AM LentilSandEater
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** Not always, due to HardLevelsEasyBosses.



* Parodied in ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'', where the four ninjas (Kennen, Shen, Akali, and Zed) all have a hidden passive which reduces their maximum hp by 1 point for every other ninja, resulting in a possible reduction of -3 hp. The effect is unnoticeable upon gameplay, and acts as an homage to the trope.
** They originally had a hidden passive where each "Flippin' Ninja" (the actual passive effect) in Rift resulted in a loss of 1 Attack Damage in a more direct homage to the trope. However, after seeing that this had a very noticeable effect on the outcome of games, it was changed to the current.

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* Parodied in ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'', where the four ninjas (Kennen, Shen, Akali, and Zed) all have a hidden passive which reduces their maximum hp by 1 point for every other ninja, resulting in a possible reduction of -3 hp. The effect is unnoticeable upon gameplay, and acts as an homage to the trope.
**
trope. They originally had a hidden passive where each "Flippin' Ninja" (the actual passive effect) in Rift resulted in a loss of 1 Attack Damage in a more direct homage to the trope. However, after seeing that this had a very noticeable effect on the outcome of games, it was changed to the current.
16th Apr '17 7:11:39 PM nombretomado
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* A mission in the single player ''StarWarsBattlefront 2'' has your clone trooper attack force and one Sith going up against a horde of Jedi, who unlike the Jedi hero characters, die in a couple shots ([[GlassCannon though their lightsabers hurt just as much]]). This is some kind of cosmic and cruel irony.

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* A mission in the single player ''StarWarsBattlefront ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefront 2'' has your clone trooper attack force and one Sith going up against a horde of Jedi, who unlike the Jedi hero characters, die in a couple shots ([[GlassCannon though their lightsabers hurt just as much]]). This is some kind of cosmic and cruel irony.
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