History ComicBook / Robin

5th Mar '17 6:31:59 PM nombretomado
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Compare and contrast ComicBook/BuckyBarnes, {{Marvel}}'s take on the classic KidSidekick later updated for modern readers.

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Compare and contrast ComicBook/BuckyBarnes, {{Marvel}}'s {{Creator/Marvel}}'s take on the classic KidSidekick later updated for modern readers.
23rd Feb '17 7:42:14 AM Kafkesque
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* In the original ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', a college-aged Dick Grayson was Robin, and generally true to his roots. However, when the show was revived and revamped as ''The New Batman Adventures,'' they decided to shake up the status quo, graduating Dick to Nightwing and introducing a young Tim Drake as Robin. They skipped Jason Todd due to the character having some baggage that isn't exactly family friendly, but given that Jason Todd had an excellent origin story, the decision was made to combine the two into one. In this universe, Dick Grayson never quite reconciled with Bruce after their initial falling out. They could get along and work together, but were permanently estranged at some point. Meanwhile, Tim Drake had his career as Robin cut short after being brutalized by and [[spoiler:accidentally killing The Joker]]. He grows up into a successful engineer with a wife (who, according to DVD extras, is meant to be an older Stephanie Brown) and kids. Robin not appear in ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' and ''Justice League Unlimited'' due to embargo about Batman TAS supporting cast.

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* In the original ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', a college-aged Dick Grayson was Robin, and generally true to his roots. However, when the show was revived and revamped as ''The New Batman Adventures,'' they decided to shake up the status quo, graduating Dick to Nightwing and introducing a young Tim Drake as Robin. They skipped Jason Todd due to the character having some baggage that isn't exactly family friendly, but given that Jason Todd had an excellent origin story, the decision was made to combine the two into one. In this universe, Dick Grayson never quite reconciled with Bruce after their initial falling out. They could get along and work together, but were permanently estranged at some point. Meanwhile, Tim Drake had his career as Robin cut short after being brutalized by and [[spoiler:accidentally killing The Joker]]. He grows up into a successful engineer with a wife (who, according to DVD extras, is meant to be an older Stephanie Brown) and kids. kids, as seen in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond''. Robin does not appear in ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' and ''Justice League Unlimited'' due to an embargo about on the Batman TAS supporting cast.
4th Feb '17 11:33:23 PM fusilcontrafusil
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After Dick Grayson, a new character named Jason Todd was introduced as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute (right down to origins as an orphaned circus acrobat). He acted nigh-indistinguishable in such stories as "ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything", where he's instrumental in saving the day (and Franchise/{{Superman}}, Batman and Franchise/WonderWoman's lives). In the AlternateContinuity series ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' where an aged Batman comes out of retirement, he's long since died. When Batman decides to keep Carrie Kelley (see below) as Robin, Alfred objects because of [[NoodleIncident what happened to Jason]]. Batman says that Jason was a "good soldier", but the war continues.

to:

After Dick Grayson, a new character named Jason Todd was introduced as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute (right down to origins as an orphaned circus acrobat). He acted nigh-indistinguishable in such stories as "ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything", where he's instrumental in saving the day (and and Franchise/{{Superman}}, Batman and Franchise/WonderWoman's lives).lives. In the AlternateContinuity series ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' where an aged Batman comes out of retirement, he's long since died. When Batman decides to keep Carrie Kelley (see below) as Robin, Alfred objects because of [[NoodleIncident what happened to Jason]]. Batman says that Jason was a "good soldier", but the war continues.



For a time, the most famous thing about Jason Todd was that he (like his ComicBook/CaptainAmerica counterpart ComicBook/BuckyBarnes), had [[DeathIsCheap remained dead]]. For years, Batman kept a poignant memorial with his [[TragicKeepsake empty costume]] in the Batcave ([[DiscontinuityNod directly lifted from]] ''The Dark Knight Returns''). Since then, however, he has come BackFromTheDead and has re-adopted several identities which were once used by other characters: the Red Hood (originally used by SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker), Red Robin and Nightwing (both originally used by Dick Grayson). Since his return, Jason Todd has become even more of an AntiHero than ever and is even sometimes cast as a villain for both Batman and Nightwing, standing in opposition to their ThouShaltNotKill ideology.

to:

For a time, the most famous thing about Jason Todd was that he (like his ComicBook/CaptainAmerica counterpart ComicBook/BuckyBarnes), had [[DeathIsCheap remained dead]]. For years, Batman kept a poignant memorial with his [[TragicKeepsake empty costume]] in the Batcave ([[DiscontinuityNod ([[MythologyGag directly lifted from]] ''The Dark Knight Returns''). Since then, however, he has come BackFromTheDead and has re-adopted several identities which were once used by other characters: the Red Hood (originally used by SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker), Red Robin and Nightwing (both originally used by Dick Grayson). Since his return, Jason Todd has become even more of an AntiHero than ever and is even sometimes cast as a villain for both Batman and Nightwing, standing in opposition to their ThouShaltNotKill ideology.



In 2003, Tim Drake briefly retired as Robin to pursue an ordinary life. Batman picked his supporting character and LoveInterest Stephanie Brown, the daughter of the minor villain Cluemaster who had adopted the heroic identity of Spoiler, to become the new Robin. Stephanie's tenure as Robin was rife with controversy, including the insinuation that her promotion was a BatmanGambit (by the TropeNamer himself no less) to anger Tim Drake into returning as Robin. Stephanie was fired from the role for a relatively minor mistake (compared to the blunders previous Robins had done) and then [[DroppedABridgeOnHim unceremoniously killed off]] in 2004. It was later revealed through WordOfGod that Stephanie's role as Robin was never meant to be permanent and was only meant to make her death more dramatic and shocking. This has later been cited as a textbook case of StuffedIntoTheFridge, especially since after her death, Stephanie was barely mentioned by the other Bat-family characters and she received no monument (as Jason Todd had upon his death). Stephanie was revealed to be [[HesJustHiding in hiding]] in 2009 and took the role of ComicBook/{{Batgirl|2009}}. When the DC universe was relaunched after the ''ComicBook/{{Flashpoint}}'' storyline in 2011, early reports stated that she would return to the Spoiler identity, but her only appearance so far has been in ''Batman: Leviathan Strikes'', which is explicitly stated to take place in pre-Flashpoint continuity.

to:

In 2003, Tim Drake briefly retired as Robin to pursue an ordinary life. Batman picked his Tim's supporting character and LoveInterest Stephanie Brown, the daughter of the minor villain Cluemaster who had adopted the heroic identity of Spoiler, to become the new Robin. Stephanie's tenure as Robin was rife with controversy, including the insinuation that her promotion was a BatmanGambit (by the TropeNamer himself no less) to anger Tim Drake into returning as Robin. Stephanie was fired from the role for a relatively minor mistake (compared to the blunders previous Robins had done) and then [[DroppedABridgeOnHim unceremoniously killed off]] in 2004. It was later revealed through WordOfGod that Stephanie's role as Robin was never meant to be permanent and was only meant to make her death more dramatic and shocking. This has later been cited as a textbook case of StuffedIntoTheFridge, especially since after her death, Stephanie was barely mentioned by the other Bat-family characters and she received no monument (as Jason Todd had upon his death). Stephanie was revealed to be [[HesJustHiding in hiding]] in 2009 and took the role of ComicBook/{{Batgirl|2009}}. When the DC universe was relaunched after the ''ComicBook/{{Flashpoint}}'' storyline in 2011, early reports stated that she would return to the Spoiler identity, but her only appearance so far has been in ''Batman: Leviathan Strikes'', which is explicitly stated to take place in pre-Flashpoint continuity.
4th Feb '17 11:28:07 PM fusilcontrafusil
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As time went along, the implications regarding a [[HoYay rich adult who lived alone with a traumatized teenage orphan boy]] (Alfred would not become part of the Batman home until sometime later) garnered [[MoralGuardians negative media attention]]. [[NewMediaAreEvil Comic books were blamed]] for everything from juvenile delinquency to homosexuality [[RedScare to communism]], and the "indecent" relationship between Batman and Robin is often cited as one of the major reasons for the creation of UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode that spelled the end of UsefulNotes/TheInterregnum and the dawn of UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks. Robin's reputation as a character suffered its greatest blow in this period, and the repercussions are still felt to this day (such as in parodies like the [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Ambiguously Gay Duo]]). Outside of comics, new media involving the two has tended to split them apart. Batman has remained consistently popular and has been subject to [[Film/{{Batman}} many]] [[ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns darker]] [[Film/TheDarkKnightSaga reimaginings]], but Robin has found [[Comicbook/RobinSeries more]] [[ComicBook/{{Nightwing}} success]] [[WesternAnimation/TeenTitans away]] [[WesternAnimation/YoungJustice from]] [[OvershadowedByAwesome his/her mentor's shadow.]]

to:

As time went along, the implications regarding a [[HoYay rich adult who lived alone with a traumatized teenage orphan boy]] (Alfred the Butler would not become part of the Batman home until sometime later) garnered [[MoralGuardians negative media attention]]. [[NewMediaAreEvil Comic books were blamed]] for everything from juvenile delinquency to homosexuality [[RedScare to communism]], and the "indecent" relationship between Batman and Robin is often cited as one of the major reasons for the creation of UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode that spelled the end of UsefulNotes/TheInterregnum and the dawn of UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks. Robin's reputation as a character suffered its greatest blow in this period, and the repercussions are still felt to this day (such as in parodies like the [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Ambiguously Gay Duo]]). Outside of comics, new media involving the two has tended to split them apart. Batman has remained consistently popular and has been subject to [[Film/{{Batman}} many]] [[ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns darker]] [[Film/TheDarkKnightSaga reimaginings]], but Robin has found [[Comicbook/RobinSeries more]] [[ComicBook/{{Nightwing}} success]] [[WesternAnimation/TeenTitans away]] [[WesternAnimation/YoungJustice from]] [[OvershadowedByAwesome his/her mentor's shadow.]]



It's worth noting that Dick Grayson was Robin from 1940 to 1983-- 43 years, by far the longest tenure. Jason was Robin from 1983 to 1988 (5 years, with a reboot in the middle), Tim from 1989 to 2009 (20 years), Stephanie for one story arc, and Damian from 2009 to 2013 and from 2015 onwards (five years). The Golden Age Robin of Earth-2, who stuck to that identity long after he passed into adulthood and middle age, died alongside his partner the ComicBook/{{Huntress}} at the end of the ''Crisis On Infinite Earths''.

to:

It's worth noting that Dick Grayson was Robin from 1940 to 1983-- 43 years, by far the longest tenure. Jason was Robin from 1983 to 1988 (5 years, with a reboot in the middle), Tim from 1989 to 2009 (20 years), Stephanie for one story arc, and Damian from 2009 to 2013 and from 2015 onwards (five years). The Golden Age Robin of Earth-2, who stuck to that identity long after he passed into adulthood and middle age, died alongside his partner the ComicBook/{{Huntress}} at the end of the ''Crisis On Infinite Earths''.
''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths'' event which rebooted the DC universe.



After Dick Grayson, a new character named Jason Todd was introduced as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute (right down to origins as an orphaned circus acrobat) until he was {{Retcon}}ned to be a former teen delinquent to distinguish him from Dick Grayson. Todd was [[ReplacementScrappy unpopular]] with those who had grown up with Dick Grayson (including his writers-- when editorial wanted suggestions for a character that could be killed in an [=AIDS=] storyline, Jim Starlin put his name in), so he was KilledOffForReal by SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker in the infamous ''[[ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily A Death In The Family]]'' storyline in 1988. This death was significant in a number of ways: first, whether he would live or die was put to a readership vote (via a hotline number: 5,271 votes for him to live, 5,343 votes for him to die). Second, just like ''ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied'', this was a tragic event which codified UsefulNotes/TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks. Third, this would top SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker's list of most heinous crimes (following the shooting of ComicBook/{{Batgirl}} by only a couple of months) and cement his status as one of the most despicable villains in comics' history. (And as a bonus, [[AlasPoorScrappy some people thought his death was... a bit TOO mean.]])

For a time, the most famous thing about Jason Todd was that he (like his ComicBook/CaptainAmerica counterpart ComicBook/BuckyBarnes), had [[DeathIsCheap remained dead]]. Since then, however, he has come BackFromTheDead and has re-adopted several identities which were once used by other characters: the Red Hood (originally used by SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker), Red Robin and Nightwing (both originally used by Dick Grayson). Since his return, Jason Todd has become even more of an AntiHero than ever and is even sometimes cast as a villain for both Batman and Nightwing, standing in opposition to their ThouShaltNotKill ideology.

to:

After Dick Grayson, a new character named Jason Todd was introduced as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute (right down to origins as an orphaned circus acrobat) until he acrobat). He acted nigh-indistinguishable in such stories as "ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything", where he's instrumental in saving the day (and Franchise/{{Superman}}, Batman and Franchise/WonderWoman's lives). In the AlternateContinuity series ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' where an aged Batman comes out of retirement, he's long since died. When Batman decides to keep Carrie Kelley (see below) as Robin, Alfred objects because of [[NoodleIncident what happened to Jason]]. Batman says that Jason was a "good soldier", but the war continues.

After ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths'', Jason
was {{Retcon}}ned to be a [[DarkerAndEdgier former teen delinquent delinquent]] to distinguish him from Dick Grayson. Todd This version was [[ReplacementScrappy unpopular]] with those who had grown up with Dick Grayson (including his writers-- when editorial wanted suggestions for a character that could be killed in an [=AIDS=] storyline, Jim Starlin put his name in), so he was KilledOffForReal by SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker in the infamous ''[[ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily A Death In The Family]]'' storyline in 1988. This death was significant in a number of ways: first, whether he would live or die was put to a readership vote (via a hotline number: 5,271 votes for him to live, 5,343 votes for him to die). Second, just like ''ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied'', this was a tragic event which codified UsefulNotes/TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks. Third, this would top SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker's list of most heinous crimes (following the shooting of ComicBook/{{Batgirl}} by only a couple of months) and cement his status as one of the most despicable villains in comics' history. (And as a bonus, [[AlasPoorScrappy some people thought his death was... a bit TOO mean.]])

For a time, the most famous thing about Jason Todd was that he (like his ComicBook/CaptainAmerica counterpart ComicBook/BuckyBarnes), had [[DeathIsCheap remained dead]]. For years, Batman kept a poignant memorial with his [[TragicKeepsake empty costume]] in the Batcave ([[DiscontinuityNod directly lifted from]] ''The Dark Knight Returns''). Since then, however, he has come BackFromTheDead and has re-adopted several identities which were once used by other characters: the Red Hood (originally used by SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker), Red Robin and Nightwing (both originally used by Dick Grayson). Since his return, Jason Todd has become even more of an AntiHero than ever and is even sometimes cast as a villain for both Batman and Nightwing, standing in opposition to their ThouShaltNotKill ideology.



In 2003, Tim Drake briefly retired as Robin to pursue an ordinary life. His supporting character (and LoveInterest) Stephanie Brown was picked by Batman to become the new Robin. Stephanie's tenure as Robin was rife with controversy, including the insinuation that her promotion was a BatmanGambit (by the TropeNamer himself no less) to anger Tim Drake into returning as Robin. Stephanie was fired from the role for a relatively minor mistake (compared to the blunders previous Robins had done) and then [[DroppedABridgeOnHim unceremoniously killed off]] in 2004. It was later revealed through WordOfGod that Stephanie's role as Robin was never meant to be permanent and was only meant to make her death more dramatic and shocking. This has later been cited as a textbook case of StuffedIntoTheFridge, especially since after her death, Stephanie was barely mentioned by the other Bat-family characters and she received no monument (as Jason Todd had upon his death). Stephanie was revealed to be [[HesJustHiding in hiding]] in 2009 and took the role of ComicBook/{{Batgirl|2009}}. When the DC universe was relaunched after the ''ComicBook/{{Flashpoint}}'' storyline in 2011, early reports stated that she would return to the Spoiler identity, but her only appearance so far has been in ''Batman: Leviathan Strikes'', which is explicitly stated to take place in pre-Flashpoint continuity.

Steph is unique among the Robins in several ways, being the one with the shortest term, the only (canonical) female, the only one to begin as a co-star in another book series, the only blonde, and the only Robin to never be adopted into the Wayne family. Following the New 52, [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome Stephanie's status is still unknown]], with numerous writers requesting and being denied even ''mentioning'' her. Eventually, Scott Snyder was allowed to use her in one of his ''Batman'' issues, which served as a preview of his ''Batman Eternal'' series, in which Steph plays a key role in the story. The daughter of Cluemaster, she accidentally stumbles in on a supervillain meeting of sorts, led by her father, which leads to him trying to kill her. While she does like to drop the word "spoil" and "spoiler" a lot, she has not yet adopted a costume or codename.

to:

In 2003, Tim Drake briefly retired as Robin to pursue an ordinary life. His Batman picked his supporting character (and LoveInterest) and LoveInterest Stephanie Brown was picked by Batman Brown, the daughter of the minor villain Cluemaster who had adopted the heroic identity of Spoiler, to become the new Robin. Stephanie's tenure as Robin was rife with controversy, including the insinuation that her promotion was a BatmanGambit (by the TropeNamer himself no less) to anger Tim Drake into returning as Robin. Stephanie was fired from the role for a relatively minor mistake (compared to the blunders previous Robins had done) and then [[DroppedABridgeOnHim unceremoniously killed off]] in 2004. It was later revealed through WordOfGod that Stephanie's role as Robin was never meant to be permanent and was only meant to make her death more dramatic and shocking. This has later been cited as a textbook case of StuffedIntoTheFridge, especially since after her death, Stephanie was barely mentioned by the other Bat-family characters and she received no monument (as Jason Todd had upon his death). Stephanie was revealed to be [[HesJustHiding in hiding]] in 2009 and took the role of ComicBook/{{Batgirl|2009}}. When the DC universe was relaunched after the ''ComicBook/{{Flashpoint}}'' storyline in 2011, early reports stated that she would return to the Spoiler identity, but her only appearance so far has been in ''Batman: Leviathan Strikes'', which is explicitly stated to take place in pre-Flashpoint continuity.

Steph is unique among the Robins in several ways, being the one with the shortest term, the only (canonical) female, the only one to begin as a co-star in another book series, the only blonde, and the only Robin to never be adopted into the Wayne family. Following the New 52, [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome Stephanie's status is still unknown]], with numerous writers requesting and being denied even ''mentioning'' her. Eventually, Scott Snyder was allowed to use her in one of his ''Batman'' issues, which served as a preview of his ''Batman Eternal'' series, in which Steph plays a key role in the story. The Still the daughter of Cluemaster, she accidentally stumbles in on a supervillain meeting of sorts, led by her father, which leads to him trying to kill her. While she does like to drop the word "spoil" and "spoiler" a lot, she has not yet adopted a costume or codename.
26th Dec '16 11:28:07 AM nombretomado
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Jason's also notable for his part in what is considered a monumental achievement of [=DC=] animation: ''BatmanUnderTheRedHood''. Written by Creator/JuddWinick, who originally pitched and wrote Jason's resurrection in the comics, he took the movie as an opportunity to revise and vastly improve on the original story, tightening up the plot and, most notably, changing the method of Jason's resurrection from a gimmicky tie-in to an event crossover to the Lazarus Pit, a well-established element of the Batman mythos. Even those who want their hotline money back would rather consider it canon.

to:

Jason's also notable for his part in what is considered a monumental achievement of [=DC=] animation: ''BatmanUnderTheRedHood''.''WesternAnimation/BatmanUnderTheRedHood''. Written by Creator/JuddWinick, who originally pitched and wrote Jason's resurrection in the comics, he took the movie as an opportunity to revise and vastly improve on the original story, tightening up the plot and, most notably, changing the method of Jason's resurrection from a gimmicky tie-in to an event crossover to the Lazarus Pit, a well-established element of the Batman mythos. Even those who want their hotline money back would rather consider it canon.
11th Dec '16 10:47:58 PM ChrisDen
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** The Robins also represent specific aspects of Batman. Dick is the acrobat and leader, Jason is the fighter, Tim is the detective, and Damien is the ninja. Each Robin is also hinted to surpass Batman in the future.

to:

** The Robins also represent specific aspects of Batman. Dick is the acrobat and leader, Jason is the fighter, Tim is the detective, and Damien Damian is the ninja. Each Robin is also hinted to surpass Batman in the future.



** As of Rebirth, Damien is also the foil to Jon Kent's Superboy. Both are the sons of the two greatest superheroes, but, much like their fathers, are polar opposites. One is a brooding, misanthropic, suspicious pain in the backside with too much training and not enough friends, and the other is a cheerful, optimistic, polite little ray of sunshine still getting used to his powers.

to:

** As of Rebirth, Damien Damian is also the foil to Jon Kent's Superboy. Both are the sons of the two greatest superheroes, but, much like their fathers, are polar opposites. One is a brooding, misanthropic, suspicious pain in the backside with too much training and not enough friends, and the other is a cheerful, optimistic, polite little ray of sunshine still getting used to his powers.



** Damien also favors katanas, while Duke uses nun-chucks.

to:

** Damien Damian also favors katanas, while Duke uses nun-chucks.
5th Dec '16 10:54:59 AM Gesperitia
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** Damien also favors katanas.

to:

** Damien also favors katanas.katanas, while Duke uses nun-chucks.
5th Dec '16 10:53:39 AM Gesperitia
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!!!#6)Ducke Thomas
During Creator/ScottSnyder's {{Flashback}} arc ''Comicbook/BatmanZeroYear'', Bruce encountered an intelligent youngster by the name of Duke Thomas. In the present, Duke returned in the ''Comicbook/BatmanEndgame'', and has been announced as the lead of the upcoming ''ComicBook/WeAreRobin'' series.

to:

!!!#6)Ducke !!!#6)Duke Thomas
During Creator/ScottSnyder's {{Flashback}} arc ''Comicbook/BatmanZeroYear'', Bruce encountered an intelligent youngster by the name of Duke Thomas. In the present, Duke returned in the ''Comicbook/BatmanEndgame'', and has been announced as the lead of the upcoming ''ComicBook/WeAreRobin'' series. In DCRebirth, Batman tells Duke that he has no intention of training Duke to become a Robin, but something new, in an accelerated pace more akin to a partnership.
5th Dec '16 10:49:04 AM Gesperitia
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Added DiffLines:

** As of Rebirth, Damien is also the foil to Jon Kent's Superboy. Both are the sons of the two greatest superheroes, but, much like their fathers, are polar opposites. One is a brooding, misanthropic, suspicious pain in the backside with too much training and not enough friends, and the other is a cheerful, optimistic, polite little ray of sunshine still getting used to his powers.
5th Dec '16 10:44:12 AM Gesperitia
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* {{Foil}}: To Batman, in various way. Dick's upbeat attitude made him a far more beloved and respected crimefighter than his mentor; Jason was a criminal before becoming Robin, and took the darkest aspects of Batman's goals while ignoring its benevolent spirit; Tim took a more pragmatic and functional approach to crimefighting, detaching it from his personal life instead of BecomingTheMask; Finally, Damian was raised to fight crime ruthlessly and without any tragedy to guide his conscience.

to:

* {{Foil}}: To Batman, in various way. ways. Dick's upbeat attitude made him a far more beloved and respected crimefighter than his mentor; Jason was a criminal before becoming Robin, and took the darkest aspects of Batman's goals while ignoring its benevolent spirit; Tim took a more pragmatic and functional approach to crimefighting, detaching it from his personal life instead of BecomingTheMask; Finally, Damian was raised to fight crime ruthlessly and without any tragedy to guide his conscience.conscience.
** The Robins also represent specific aspects of Batman. Dick is the acrobat and leader, Jason is the fighter, Tim is the detective, and Damien is the ninja. Each Robin is also hinted to surpass Batman in the future.



** If you've noticed from all the examples above, each Robin either surpassed Batman in their own specialities, or are indicated to surpass him in the future.


Added DiffLines:

** Damien also favors katanas.
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