History Characters / Hamlet

9th Jun '16 11:06:15 PM SoapheadChurch
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* UpperClassTwit: One interpretation is that he's a parody of the Renaissance ''novus homus'': a commoner who rises to noble rank through his invaluable humanistic education.

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* UpperClassTwit: One interpretation is that he's a parody of the Renaissance ''novus homus'': a an over-educated commoner who rises to noble rank through his invaluable humanistic education. living the good life because he's impressed enough nobles.
9th Jun '16 11:01:08 PM SoapheadChurch
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* NoCelebretiesWereHarmed: He's based off of the Roman Emperor Claudius I, who was considered the archetypal EvilEmperor in Elizabethan England, and who was poisoned by his niece (with whom he had an incestuous marriage.)

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* NoCelebretiesWereHarmed: NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: He's based off of the Roman Emperor Claudius I, who was considered the archetypal EvilEmperor Evil Emperor in Elizabethan England, and who was poisoned by his niece (with whom he had an incestuous marriage.)
9th Jun '16 6:35:11 PM SoapheadChurch
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%%* MoodSwinger. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* MoodSwinger. Please add context before un-commenting* MoodSwinger: He swings back and forth from melancholy to manic as the play goes on. This may be a part of his feigned madness, or may simply be one of his many genuine oddities.



%%* SociopathicHero. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* StrawNihilist. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* SociopathicHero. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* StrawNihilist. Please add context before un-commenting
* SociopathicHero: His commitment to correcting Claudius' injustice, a noble and moral goal on its own, is marred by the fact that he ruins his loved ones' lives without much concern in the process.
* StrawNihilist: His "To be, or not to be" soliloquy gives this impression. He considers suicide as a better alternative to the situation he finds himself in, and questions whether his actions have any meaning to begin with since he's just going to die anyway.



%%* TheCasanova. Please add context before un-commenting



%%* DirtyCoward. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* DirtyCoward. Please add context before un-commenting* DirtyCoward: From Hamlet's point of view, for killing Old Hamlet with poison. It shows in his repeated schemes to kill Hamlet in the most roundabout ways he can.



%%* ItsAllAboutMe. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* ManipulativeBastard. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* ItsAllAboutMe. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* ManipulativeBastard. Please add context before un-commenting
* ItsAllAboutMe: He has absolutely no qualms about murdering his brother and nephew, and ruthlessly manipulating his wife and chief courtier, all in the name of protecting his crown.
* ManipulativeBastard: He's extremely adept at playing all of the characters against one another. The only one who is wise to him is Hamlet, and he can never bring himself to do anything about it.
* NoCelebretiesWereHarmed: He's based off of the Roman Emperor Claudius I, who was considered the archetypal EvilEmperor in Elizabethan England, and who was poisoned by his niece (with whom he had an incestuous marriage.)



%%* RasputinianDeath. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* RasputinianDeath. Please add context before un-commenting* RasputinianDeath: Hamlet finally kills him by stabbing him through the heart with a poisoned sword, and then forcing him to drink poisoned liquor. In that order.



%%* SleazyPolitician. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* SuccessionCrisis. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* VillainWithGoodPublicity. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* SleazyPolitician. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* SuccessionCrisis. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* VillainWithGoodPublicity. Please add context before un-commenting
* SleazyPolitician: Murder seems to be the one political tool he has in his repertoire.
* SuccessionCrisis: With King Hamlet dead and Prince Hamlet too young to take the throne, Claudius [[SarcasmMode graciously]] accepts the crown of Denmark.
* VillainWithGoodPublicity: Claudius is generally beloved by his court and the populous, all of whom are unaware that he usurped the crown by killing his brother.



%%* ButtMonkey. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* ButtMonkey. Please add context before un-commenting* ButtMonkey: She ends up getting the worst of the scheming of Hamlet, Polonius, and Claudius.



%%* KillTheCutie. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* LoveHurts: Especially for the love interest in a Shakespearian tragedy. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* KillTheCutie. Please add context before un-commenting
%%*
* KillTheCutie: She's so sweet and lovely that she had absolutely no chance of surviving a play like this one.
*
LoveHurts: Especially for the Her love interest in of Hamlet is the cause of a Shakespearian tragedy. Please add context before un-commentinggreat deal of grief. A combination of her father's meddling and Hamlet's ill-conceived rejection drives her insane.



%%* TalkativeLoon. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* TemporaryLoveInterest. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* TalkativeLoon. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* TemporaryLoveInterest. Please add context before un-commenting
* TalkativeLoon: In her final scenes, she is reduced to rambling vaguely prophetic-sounding nonsense.
* TemporaryLoveInterest: Likely a case of an UnbuiltTrope. Her relationship with Hamlet fits the requirements, but her departure from the story is ''very'' significant.



* CaptainObvious: His LastWords, if anyone was unsure.



%%* HurricaneOfAphorisms. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* HurricaneOfAphorisms. Please add context * FamousLastWords: [[CaptainObvious O, I am slain!]]
* HurricaneOfAphorisms: He delivers one to Laertes as his final advice
before un-commentinghe sends him off to study. It sounds like good advice on its face, until you remember that Polonius is the source.



%%* IdiotBall: Takes it and runs with it. This eventually leads to TooDumbToLive. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* * IdiotBall: Takes it For a man who claims to be so wise, every single one of his decisions ends badly for him. Driving a wedge between Ophelia and runs with it. This eventually leads Hamlet drives the former insane and the latter off the deep end, the advice he gives to TooDumbToLive. Please add context before un-commentingClaudius and Gertrude about Hamlet's madness goes completely awry, and his final attempt to spy on Hamlet gets him killed.



%%* ObfuscatingStupidity. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* OldWindbag. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* OverprotectiveDad. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* ObfuscatingStupidity. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* OldWindbag. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* OverprotectiveDad. Please add context before un-commenting
* ObfuscatingStupidity: One interpretation of his character is that he's much smarter than he appears, but plays the part of the fool in order to stay in the good graces of the king and hide his devious social climbing.
* OldWindbag: He'll go on and on with sententious displays of his "wisdom" to anyone who will listen. Hamlet calls him a "Tedious old fool."
* OverprotectiveDad: To both of his children. He sends a spy to monitor Laertes while he studies in Paris, and drives himself between Ophelia and her love Hamlet.



%%* SleazyPolitician. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* UpperClassTwit. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* SleazyPolitician. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* UpperClassTwit. Please add context before un-commenting
* SleazyPolitician: Ostensibly, he's the King's chief counselor, but he's really just a sycophant willing to scheme and connive to maintain his status.
* UpperClassTwit: One interpretation is that he's a parody of the Renaissance ''novus homus'': a commoner who rises to noble rank through his invaluable humanistic education.



%%* TheAce. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* BirdsOfAFeather: With Hamlet. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* {{Foil}}: To Hamlet. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* TheAce. Please add context before un-commenting
%%*
* TheAce: Young Fortinbras is both an accomplished student and a successful military commander. His arrival to take the throne of Denmark is shown in a very positive light, as there's every indication that he will be a superior king to both Claudius and Hamlet.
*
BirdsOfAFeather: With Hamlet. Please add context before un-commenting
%%*
Despite having every reason to hate each other, Hamlet and Fortinbras actually share a mutual respect for each other due to their similarity.
*
{{Foil}}: To Hamlet. Please add context before un-commentingWhereas Hamlet is indecisive, moody, and prone to long-winded introspective speeches, Fortinbras is impulsive, passionate, and active.



* HoYay or HeterosexualLifePartners: He and Hamlet seem quite close, to the point of Horatio being willing to commit suicide upon Hamlet's death (effectively forsaking his own salvation). Horatio is the only person Hamlet truly trusts enough to impart his plans to him, the only one who doesn't betray him in some fashion. Some productions do add a homoerotic element to their relationship (or, in one case, they cast Horatio as a woman in love with Hamlet).

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* HoYay or HeterosexualLifePartners: He and Hamlet seem quite close, to the point of Horatio being willing to commit suicide upon Hamlet's death (effectively forsaking his own salvation). Horatio is the only person Hamlet truly trusts enough to impart his plans to him, the only one who doesn't betray him in some fashion. Some productions do add a homoerotic element to their relationship (or, in one case, they cast Horatio as a woman in love with Hamlet).
* InformedAbility: Horatio is called in to confirm or deny the apparition of King Hamlet supposedly because he is a scholar. However, he never demonstrates that he's any smarter or more educated than Hamlet or Laertes.



%% * ThoseTwoGuys: Please provide context before un-commenting

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%% * ThoseTwoGuys: Please provide context They may have been the [[TropeMaker Trope Makers]]...if they didn't get [[UnbuiltTrope killed off before un-commenting
they have a chance to do much.]]
30th Mar '16 3:42:44 PM Silverblade2
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** JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Possibly. In a way, he may have been warning Ophelia of the dangers associated with loving him, rejecting her so that no further harm would befall her.



* NotSoDifferent: He and Claudius are similar in many ways.
** Also with Fortinbras. [[LampshadeHanging Hamlet realizes this, as well.]] The four sons Fortinbras, Pyrrhus, Hamlet and Laertes are bound by the same task, yet how differently they approach it is rather interesting to see. (And Hamlet wasn't too bad; Fortinbras delayed for sixteen years.)

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* NotSoDifferent: He and Claudius are similar in many ways.
** Also with
With Fortinbras. [[LampshadeHanging Hamlet realizes this, as well.]] well. The four sons Fortinbras, Pyrrhus, Hamlet and Laertes are bound by the same task, yet how differently they approach it is rather interesting to see. (And Hamlet wasn't too bad; Fortinbras delayed for sixteen years.)



* NotSoDifferent: His actions and those of Hamlet, specially regarding the letter to England, are rather similar.



* BarefootLoon[=/=]DoesNotLikeShoes: In many adaptations theatrical productions, films, paintings, etc. Ophelia is barefoot during the mad scene.

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* BarefootLoon[=/=]DoesNotLikeShoes: BarefootLoon: In many adaptations theatrical productions, films, paintings, etc. Ophelia is barefoot during the mad scene.
12th Mar '16 2:42:37 PM jewishenjolras
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%%* BreakTheCutie. Please add context before un-commenting
%%* BroodingBoyGentleGirl: Hamlet and Ophelia could be seen as a deconstruction. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* BreakTheCutie. Please add context before un-commenting
%%*
* BreakTheCutie: Her TraumaCongaLine of her brother leaving, her lover rejecting her, her father dying, and her lover leaving hits her hard.
*
BroodingBoyGentleGirl: Hamlet and Ophelia could be seen as a deconstruction. Please add context before un-commentingOphelia is gentle, sweet, and fragile, whereas Hamlet is brooding and angst-ridden, yet both of them are given much more complexity than the simplicity of this trope entails. They are alike in many ways; they both have a fragile mental state, and yet act out in different ways.



%%* FlowerMotifs. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* FlowerMotifs. Please add context before un-commenting* FlowerMotifs: As part of her trope-naming [[TheOphelia Ophelia]]-sequence, she scatters flowers and hands different ones to different characters. The meaning behind each of the flowers remains open to interpretation.



* LoveMartyr: Ophelia is utterly devoted to Hamlet, despite his cold rejection and abusive treatment of her. This, among several other [[TraumaCongaLine tragic circumstances]] eventually leads her to make the ultimate sacrifice: [[DrivenToSuicide her life]].



%%* TheOphelia: The TropeNamer. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%* * TheOphelia: The As a beautiful young girl devolving into madness, she is the TropeNamer. Please add context before un-commenting
31st Dec '15 3:16:09 PM Boggs
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Added DiffLines:

** He despises Claudius for murdering his father, but whereas Claudius only commits one murder for personal advancement (his planned murder of Hamlet once he becomes too problematic aside) and spends the remainder of the play feeling guilty about it, Hamlet kills several people who are only tangentially involved in what's going on and doesn't feel the least bit sorry about it.
15th Dec '15 9:45:52 AM Phediuk
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* WritersCannotDoMath: Leading to problems with calculating his age. While he is a student (which at the time wouldn't have put him past his late teens or early twenties), the gravedigger indirectly mentions that he is about thirty. [[AgeLift Real-life casting issues]] may have played a role here.

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* WritersCannotDoMath: Leading to problems with calculating his age. While he is a student (which at the time wouldn't have put him past his late teens or early twenties), he remembers Yorick, who died twenty-three years prior, and the gravedigger indirectly mentions that he is about thirty. [[AgeLift Real-life casting issues]] may have played a role here.
5th Nov '15 11:33:49 PM JustTroper
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* BarefootLoon[=/=]DoesNotLikeShoes: In many adaptations theatrical productions, films, paintings, etc. Ophelia is barefoot during the mad scene.



* DoesNotLikeShoes: In many adaptations theatrical productions, films, paintings, etc. Ophelia is barefoot during the mad scene.
31st Oct '15 2:20:22 PM zioncanyon
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Added DiffLines:

* AmbiguousDisorder: Whole plays and college courses have been written based on Hamlet's bipolar disorder. HairTriggerTemper and over-talkativeness during his manic episodes, and anguished soliloquies during his depressed ones.
25th Jul '15 7:18:16 AM randomsurfer
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* ThoseTwoGuys: The UrExample.

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%% * ThoseTwoGuys: The UrExample.
Please provide context before un-commenting
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