History Characters / Hamlet

27th Mar '17 8:55:45 AM AnnieLeonhardts
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* ExpositoryHairstyleChange: Some productions have her start out with her hair up (as typical for women of her time) and have it get more and more unkempt throughout the play until it's completely loose, to signify her becoming more unhinged.
* FlowerInHerHair: Her "mad scene" has her come out with flowers weaved in her hair.


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* SuicideBySea: Drowns herself (if it wasn't accidental) after everything in her life goes to hell.


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* EvilMatriarch: Hamlet sees her as this. Whether or not she is one depends on interpretation.


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* RemarriedToTheMistress: Some adaptations imply she was involved with Claudius before her husband's death.
27th Mar '17 8:39:02 AM AnnieLeonhardts
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* DisposableLoveInterest: She's completely passive and entirely defined by her relationships with the male characters. When they all disappear (Hamlet rejects her, her father dies and Laertes is abroad) she goes completely to pieces and commits suicide.
12th Mar '17 6:09:35 PM Shywarp
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!!Hamlet

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!!Hamlet
[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Hamlet]]





!!Claudius

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\n!!Claudius\n[[/folder]]

[[folder:Claudius]]




!!Ophelia

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\n!!Ophelia[[/folder]]

[[folder:Ophelia]]




!!Laertes

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\n!!Laertes\n[[/folder]]

[[folder:Laertes]]




!!Polonius

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\n!!Polonius\n[[/folder]]

[[folder:Polonius]]




!!Gertrude

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\n!!Gertrude\n[[/folder]]

[[folder:Gertrude]]




!!Fortinbras

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\n!!Fortinbras\n[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fortinbras]]




!!Horatio

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\n!!Horatio\n[[/folder]]

[[folder:Horatio]]




!!Rosencrantz and Guildenstern

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\n!!Rosencrantz [[/folder]]

[[folder: Rosencrantz
and Guildenstern
Guildenstern]]


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[[/folder]]
3rd Feb '17 2:47:16 AM JustTroper
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** SpeechImpededLoveInterest: She becomes this therefore, given her relationship with Hamlet.
24th Jan '17 9:20:52 PM PaulA
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* TheOphelia: TropeNamer. Ophelia becomes ''the'' Ophelia after going mad in Act IV -- after her boyfriend stabs her dad through a curtain, her sanity quickly decays. Her brother, Laertes, returns to Elsinore from Paris in a rush, but by the time he gets there, Ophelia doesn't even recognize him. Her famous "mad scene" consists of singing filthy, bawdy songs that are out of place with her demure mien, strewing flowers, and sobbing over her father's death. The Queen later reports Ophelia drowned, saying she was collecting flowers by the riverbank and was so distracted she didn't even recognize the danger when she fell in and sank, but kept singing. Her gravediggers darkly assert she was DrivenToSuicide, and is now damned.

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* TheOphelia: TropeNamer. Ophelia becomes ''the'' Ophelia after going mad in Act IV -- after her boyfriend stabs her dad through a curtain, her sanity quickly decays. Her brother, Laertes, returns to Elsinore from Paris in a rush, but by the time he gets there, Ophelia doesn't even recognize him. Her famous "mad scene" consists of singing filthy, bawdy songs that are out of place with her demure mien, strewing flowers, and sobbing over her father's death. The Queen later reports Ophelia drowned, saying she was collecting flowers by the riverbank and was so distracted she didn't even recognize the danger when she fell in and sank, but kept singing. Her gravediggers darkly assert she was DrivenToSuicide, and is now damned.
24th Jan '17 8:20:52 PM DustSnitch
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* AntiHero. One to think rather than act, makes some morally questionable choices.

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* AntiHero. One AntiHero: He acts rudely to many who (may) mean him no harm, kills Polonius for spying on him (though he seemed to think rather than act, makes it was Claudius hiding and watching) and has Guildenstern and Rosencrantz - his college buddies! - sent to death (they ''were'' spying for Claudius, so this has some morally questionable choices. justification, [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation to varying degrees]]).



* BreakTheCutie: Hamlet was cute (according to his friends) before he was broken by the murder of his father, which has already happened by the time we meet him.
* BrokenBird: We don't meet Hamlet until after he has been broken, but according to his friends he used to be a generous, loving, and level-headed man. Due to his father's death and his uncle's betrayal, he is consumed by his own sadness and therefore unable to trust or show compassion to anyone. He cruelly mocks Ophelia, but he would not be this way if it hadn't been for the tragedy of his father's murder.



* EmoTeen: In the productions where he really is a teenager, at least.

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* DrivenToSuicide: Hamlet himself discusses the trope: his "To be or not to be" is a long meditation the fear of death versus a life of struggling (whether it was sincere, or a ploy for the benefit of the spying King and Polonius, is up to the production).
* EmoTeen: Hamlet, the original emo kid, is a brooding pessimist who dresses all in black and pontificates about suicide. He's also spoilt, and resents his mother for remarrying. The slight hitch occurs in the Gravedigger scene, where it's stated that Hamlet is actually 30. This means either (A) Hamlet is too old to be acting like this, adding to the theory that he is 'actually' mentally unbalanced (though that still doesn't explain how he's a University student at his age), or (B) Hamlet isn't 30 and [[WritersCannotDoMath Shakespeare made another mathematical error]]. [[WildMassGuessing Shakespeare scholars have suggested]] that the Gravedigger's line was thrown in at the insistence of Richard Burbage, the actor who originally played the lead role and was probably unwilling to play a teenager. Or, alternatively, Shakespeare could do maths just fine, but the gravedigger can't. Alternatively, the gravedigger had it right, but later translations got it wrong. In the productions where original spelling of the Folio text, one of the two authoritative texts for the play, the Gravedigger's answer to how long he really has "been a grave-maker" reads "Why heere in Denmarke: I haue bin sixeteene heere, man and Boy thirty yeares.." "Sixteene" is usually rendered as "sexton" (a modernization of the second quarto's "sexten"), even in modern texts that take F1 as their "copy text." But modernizing the punctuation — a teenager, at least.normal practice in modernized texts — renders "Why heere in Denmarke: I haue bin sixeteene heere—man and Boy thirty yeares." In other words, this reading suggests that he has been a grave-digger for sixteen years, but that he has lived in Denmark for thirty. According to this logic, then, it is the Grave-digger who is thirty, whereas Hamlet is only sixteen. ''However'', the teenage-Hamlet theory still doesn't explain how Hamlet can remember Yorick, who he says died twenty-three years ago.



* {{Foil}}: Hamlet has several. Most notable are Fortinbras, Horatio and Laertes. Before they fight, Hamlet (mockingly and very ironically) refers to himself as a foil to Laertes. Also a {{Pun}}, as the swords they are using are called foils. Also, the player who weeps TenderTears over Hecuba overtly inspires Hamlet to reflect on the contrast between them.



* {{Hypocrite}}: He advises the players to resist theatrics and appears to revere passionate people like Fortinbras, but he seems to like grand gestures like the play within a play and is unable to act on his passionate impulses.

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* {{Hypocrite}}: HotBlooded: Hamlet himself subverts this, claiming to admire these characters but never taking the initiative himself and passing up chances to kill his target. In something of a contradiction he castigates himself for own his lack of passion ("I am pidgeon livered and lack gall") while praising Horatio for it ("Give me the man who is not passion's slave and I will wear him in my heart's core").
* {{Hypocrite}}:
**
He advises the players to resist theatrics and appears to revere passionate people like Fortinbras, but he seems to like grand gestures like the play within a play and is unable to act on his passionate impulses.



* ItsAllAboutMe: When Hamlet comes across Laertes burying Ophelia, his beloved sister, how does he react? He claims that he loved Ophelia ''far'' more than her brother did, and no woe can ''possibly'' equal his.



* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Hamlet on witnessing Ophelia's funeral, and he only admits that he loves her after Laertes demands to be buried with his sister.



* RoyalWe: Claudius uses this with abandon-- though not, notably, during his soliloquy in the church ("Oh, my offense is rank...").



* TalkativeLoon: Feigned (possibly).

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* TalkativeLoon: Feigned (possibly). Hamlet talks nonsense and antagonizes those around him so they think he has gone mad and don't suspect him of plotting against the king. However, at certain points its unclear how much of Hamlet's madness is feigned and how much of it is legitimate.



* CainAndAbel: The Cain to [[PosthumousCharacter King Hamlet's]] Abel.

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* CainAndAbel: The Cain Claudius murders his brother prior to [[PosthumousCharacter King Hamlet's]] Abel.the beginning of the story.



* EvilUncle: He tries to have Hamlet killed twice.

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* EvilUncle: He tries to have Hamlet Hamlet, his own nephew, killed twice.



* BrokenBird: The audience gets a front row seat to Ophelia's breakdown over the course of the play, as her father uses her as a political tool, her brother jaunts off to foreign lands, her boyfriend abuses her and then murders her father, and finally Ophelia cracks.



* DishonoredDead: As her death was likely a [[SuicideIsShameful suicide]], Ophelia's burial is rather low-key. When Laertes complains about this, the priest replies that she's only getting a cemetery plot at all on the orders of the king.



* DrivenToSuicide: Probably, unless she was just so insane she didn't take heed to her clothes soaking up water while lying in a river. This is all, of course, [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation open for debate]].

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* DrivenToSuicide: Probably, unless Queen Gertrude reports Ophelia's death to have been an accident, but the man who digs her grave says she was just so insane shouldn't be buried in holy ground, because she didn't take heed to her clothes soaking up water while lying in a river. This is all, of course, [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation open for debate]].drowned herself.



* KillTheCutie: She's so sweet and lovely that she had absolutely no chance of surviving a play like this one.

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* KillTheCutie: She's so Ophelia, a sweet and lovely that she had absolutely girl with no chance enemies, is found drowned in a pool at the end of surviving a play like this one.Act IV, possibly either in an act of insanity or suicide.



* TheOphelia: As a beautiful young girl devolving into madness.

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* TheOphelia: As TropeNamer. Ophelia becomes ''the'' Ophelia after going mad in Act IV -- after her boyfriend stabs her dad through a beautiful young girl devolving into madness.curtain, her sanity quickly decays. Her brother, Laertes, returns to Elsinore from Paris in a rush, but by the time he gets there, Ophelia doesn't even recognize him. Her famous "mad scene" consists of singing filthy, bawdy songs that are out of place with her demure mien, strewing flowers, and sobbing over her father's death. The Queen later reports Ophelia drowned, saying she was collecting flowers by the riverbank and was so distracted she didn't even recognize the danger when she fell in and sank, but kept singing. Her gravediggers darkly assert she was DrivenToSuicide, and is now damned.



* CaptainObvious: Polonius is the master of this trope. Appropriately enough, his last words are, "O! I am slain!" It has been assumed he says that due to the difficulty the audience would have had confirming the death of a character behind a curtain, but still....



* WindbagPolitician: Polonius is prone to being long winded. Lampshaded when he says "Brevity is the soul of wit," at the end of one of his rambling speeches.



* HotBlooded: An unusual example, because he's ''also'' very conniving.

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* HeroOfAnotherStory: Fortinbras, who has his own revenge plot (directed against Hamlet's father/the Danes), and whose movements are referenced throughout the play, although he only appears in person at the end, wherein his revenge completely succeeds and he conquers Denmark (aided by almost everyone else being dead).
* HotBlooded: An unusual example, because he's ''also'' very conniving.conniving, yet he still goes to war over a valueless piece of land.
24th Jan '17 5:40:41 PM PaulA
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* TheOphelia: As a beautiful young girl devolving into madness, she is the TropeNamer.

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* TheOphelia: As a beautiful young girl devolving into madness, she is the TropeNamer. madness.



* PurpleProse: His standard manner of speaking, played for laughs with the advice given to his son, as well as the [[TropeNamer trope naming]] line for Administrivia/BrevityIsWit.

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* PurpleProse: His standard manner of speaking, played for laughs with the advice given to his son, as well as the [[TropeNamer trope naming]] line for Administrivia/BrevityIsWit.scene where he claims that "brevity is wit" and then fails to explain briefly what he's on about.



* GoodNightSweetPrince: Says these words upon Hamlet's death, thereby serving as the TropeNamer.
2nd Dec '16 8:03:05 PM CJCroen1393
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* HappilyMarried: Seems to be this with Gertrude.


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* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: A plot point--Prince Hamlet intends to use his increasing guilt over murdering his brother against him by adding a fictionalized version of it to a play and prompting a guilty response from Claudius.


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* PetTheDog: His interactions with Queen Gertrude. Early on, he seems to genuinely care about his nephew too, though later he's willing to have the prince killed too.
30th Nov '16 3:46:43 PM SoapheadChurch
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* TheDitherer: His FatalFlaw, according to many critics.

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* TheDitherer: His FatalFlaw, according to many critics. The play would have been far less tragic if he could have made up his mind to do ''something''.
16th Aug '16 4:55:56 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* AffablyEvil: A fairly common treatment in productions more sympathetic to him.
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