History BlindIdiotTranslation / RealLife

6th Sep '17 6:46:17 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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--> The machine washes the common cold separately.[[note]]Machine wash cold separately.[[/note]] Fall dry low.[[note]]Tumble dry low.[[/note]] Only the bleach of no-chlorine, when had need of.[[note]]Only non-chlorine bleach, when needed.[[/note]] Do not do the iron over the conception.[[note]]Do not iron over design.[[/note]] Do not dry neat.[[note]]Do not dry clean.[[/note]]

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--> ---> The machine washes the common cold separately.[[note]]Machine wash cold separately.[[/note]] Fall dry low.[[note]]Tumble dry low.[[/note]] Only the bleach of no-chlorine, when had need of.[[note]]Only non-chlorine bleach, when needed.[[/note]] Do not do the iron over the conception.[[note]]Do not iron over design.[[/note]] Do not dry neat.[[note]]Do not dry clean.[[/note]][[/note]]
** Rather inexplicably, numerical quantities will sometimes get butchered in translation, resulting in such hilarious oddities as a food product having different cooking temperatures in English and French, a rechargeable battery going from 500 recharges in English to 300 recharges in French or a 10 year limited warranty being reduced to one year in French.
** Other inexplicable mistakes include a "wash hands" pictogram which is captioned with "after use" in English and "before use" in French, an item which is "dishwasher safe" in English and "hand wash only" in French and a product made in U.S.A. in English and in the "[[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny People's Republic of]] U.S.A." in French.
19th Jul '17 12:56:50 PM AgProv
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** There can be misunderstandings within the wider linguistic community regarding variant meanings of the same words in Dutch and Afrikaans. In Holland, ''een poes'' is an affectionate diminutive for a cat. In South Africa, the word ''poes'' means something else completely. [[note]]clue: American English "pussy" oomes from the same root.[[/note]] Imagine, therefore, a Dutch person in South Africa trying to call his cat back to the house. ''Poes, poes, poes...''. ''Poes'' in Afrikaans might also mean "pussy". But in the Donald Trump sense.

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** There can be misunderstandings within the wider linguistic community regarding variant meanings of the same words in Dutch and Afrikaans. In Holland, ''een poes'' is an affectionate diminutive for a cat. In South Africa, the word ''poes'' means [[CountryMatters something else completely.completely]]. [[note]]clue: American English "pussy" oomes from the same root.[[/note]] Imagine, therefore, a Dutch person in South Africa trying to call his cat back to the house. ''Poes, poes, poes...''. ''Poes'' in Afrikaans might also mean "pussy". But in the Donald Trump sense.
13th Jul '17 7:51:48 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* The United States government did this when dealing with the Russian government. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton hands something to the Russian official and even says "We worked hard to find the right Russian word", just before the official points at one of the words and says "That's the wrong word." [[IncrediblyLamePun Hillarity]] [[HilarityEnsues Ensues]]. (Hillary's face was a mixture of OhCrap and trying not to laugh.)

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* The United States government did this when dealing with the Russian government. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton hands something to the Russian official and even says "We "[[TemptingFate We worked hard to find the right Russian word", word]]", just before the official points at one of the words and says "That's the wrong word." [[IncrediblyLamePun Hillarity]] [[HilarityEnsues Ensues]]. (Hillary's face was a mixture of OhCrap and trying not to laugh.)
9th Jul '17 9:10:25 PM karstovich2
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** One example of this: A common appetizer at restaurants across the Arab world is a mixture of pickled vegetables, which are most commonly called مخللات مشكلة ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' (literally, "mixed pickles").[[note]]Many if not most varieties of Arabic have alternate words for pickles, most commonly variants on the Persian-derived طرشي ''ṭurshī'', but for some reason ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' is the most common in restaurants.[[/note]] However, the word ''mushakkilah'' ("mixed") is spelled identically to the word ''mushkilah'' ("problem"), as the only difference is that the "k" sound is doubled: a difference that the Arabic writing system does not reflect in most cases, because readers can tell the difference from context. However, early machine-translation programs could not tell the difference, and merrily translated ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' as "Pickle(s) Problem," to the amusement of tourists and other English-speakers.

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** One example of this: A common appetizer at restaurants across the Arab world is a mixture of pickled vegetables, which are most commonly called مخللات مشكلة ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' (literally, "mixed pickles").[[note]]Many if not most varieties of Arabic have alternate words for pickles, most commonly variants on the Persian-derived طرشي ''ṭurshī'', but for some reason ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' is the most common in restaurants.[[/note]] However, in Arabic, the word ''mushakkilah'' ("mixed") is spelled identically to the word ''mushkilah'' ("problem"), as the only difference is that differences between the ways the words are pronounced are the short "a" sound and doubling of the "k" sound is doubled: a difference in ''mushakkilah'': differences that the Arabic writing system does not reflect in most cases, because readers can tell the difference intended word from context. However, early machine-translation programs could not tell the difference, and merrily translated ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' as "Pickle(s) Problem," to the amusement of tourists and other English-speakers.
9th Jul '17 9:06:27 PM karstovich2
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** One example of this: A common appetizer at restaurants across the Arab world is a mixture of pickled vegetables, which are most commonly called مخللات مشكلة ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' (literally, "mixed pickles").[[note]]Many if not most varieties of Arabic have alternate words for pickles, most commonly variants on the Persian-derived طرشي ''ṭurshī'', but for some reason ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' is the most common in restaurants.[[/note]] However, the word "mushakkilah'' ("mixed") is spelled identically to the word ''mushkilah'' ("problem"), as the only difference is that the "k" sound is doubled: a difference that the Arabic writing system does not reflect in most cases, because readers can tell the difference from context. However, early machine-translation programs could not tell the difference, and merrily translated ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' as "Pickle(s) Problem," to the amusement of tourists and other English-speakers.

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** One example of this: A common appetizer at restaurants across the Arab world is a mixture of pickled vegetables, which are most commonly called مخللات مشكلة ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' (literally, "mixed pickles").[[note]]Many if not most varieties of Arabic have alternate words for pickles, most commonly variants on the Persian-derived طرشي ''ṭurshī'', but for some reason ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' is the most common in restaurants.[[/note]] However, the word "mushakkilah'' ''mushakkilah'' ("mixed") is spelled identically to the word ''mushkilah'' ("problem"), as the only difference is that the "k" sound is doubled: a difference that the Arabic writing system does not reflect in most cases, because readers can tell the difference from context. However, early machine-translation programs could not tell the difference, and merrily translated ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' as "Pickle(s) Problem," to the amusement of tourists and other English-speakers.
9th Jul '17 9:05:51 PM karstovich2
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Added DiffLines:

** One example of this: A common appetizer at restaurants across the Arab world is a mixture of pickled vegetables, which are most commonly called مخللات مشكلة ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' (literally, "mixed pickles").[[note]]Many if not most varieties of Arabic have alternate words for pickles, most commonly variants on the Persian-derived طرشي ''ṭurshī'', but for some reason ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' is the most common in restaurants.[[/note]] However, the word "mushakkilah'' ("mixed") is spelled identically to the word ''mushkilah'' ("problem"), as the only difference is that the "k" sound is doubled: a difference that the Arabic writing system does not reflect in most cases, because readers can tell the difference from context. However, early machine-translation programs could not tell the difference, and merrily translated ''mukhallilāt mushakkilah'' as "Pickle(s) Problem," to the amusement of tourists and other English-speakers.
8th Jul '17 12:58:35 PM BenOfHouston
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** An equivalent English phrase would be "I am the New Yorker". It's a fairly benign if quite noticeable mistranslation.
28th Jun '17 1:10:02 AM AgProv
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** There can be misunderstandings within the wider linguistic community regarding variant meanings of the same words in Dutch and Afrikaans. In Holland, ''een poes'' is an affectionate diminutive for a cat. In South Africa, the word ''poes'' means something else completely. [[note]]clue: American English "pussy" oomes from the same root.[[/note]] Imagine, therefore, a Dutch person in South Africa trying to call his cat back to the house. ''Poes, poes, poes...''. ''Poes'' in Afrikaans might also mean "pussy". But in the Donald Trump sense.
23rd Jun '17 4:27:12 PM Gosicrystal
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** As pictured on the main page, we have a fire extinguisher that was labeled as "hand grenade" which is clearly wrong. What's interesting is that fire extinguishers ''[[AccidentallyAccurate can actually function]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W02KQMRA6gA as a hand grenade]]'' (though they won't create a fire explosion a real grenade would and will put out fire instead).

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** As pictured on the main page, we have a fire extinguisher that was labeled as "hand grenade" which is clearly wrong. What's interesting is that fire extinguishers ''[[AccidentallyAccurate ''[[AccidentallyCorrectWriting can actually function]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W02KQMRA6gA as a hand grenade]]'' (though they won't create a fire explosion a real grenade would and will put out fire instead).
7th Jun '17 10:48:22 PM DazKiwaa
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*A funny joke told in parts of Kenya about this: A school security officer finds students smoking cigarettes in class. He hurries to the principals office and reports that "The students were drinking cigarettes in class.", in vernacular is "Arutwo ni mara nyua thigara kirathi." The translation is due to the word "nyua" could mean smoking or drinking depending on the context.
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