History BlessedWithSuck / Literature

14th Nov '16 12:26:06 AM PaulA
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* Floyd Jones, the driving character (though almost never the viewpoint character) of Creator/PhilipKDick's ''Literature/TheWorldJonesMade'' can see a year into the future. Too bad his future sight is actually made of memories broadcast by his future self to his past self, essentially [[YouCantFightFate stripping him of free will]].
** Manfred, a boy from the same author's ''Martian Time-Slip'', can see into the future. Which means he is almost perpetually stuck in a twisted vision of his future as a paralyzed, dying old man in a decaying hospital. His only, temporary escape is succumbing to his schizophrenia-induced hallucinations, which are just as nightmarish and tainted by his obsession with death.

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* Creator/PhilipKDick:
**
Floyd Jones, the driving character (though almost never the viewpoint character) of Creator/PhilipKDick's ''Literature/TheWorldJonesMade'' ''Literature/TheWorldJonesMade'', can see a year into the future. Too bad his future sight is actually made of memories broadcast by his future self to his past self, essentially [[YouCantFightFate stripping him of free will]].
** Manfred, a boy from the same author's ''Martian Time-Slip'', can see into the future. Which means he is almost perpetually stuck in a twisted vision of his future as a paralyzed, dying old man in a decaying hospital. His only, temporary escape is succumbing to his schizophrenia-induced hallucinations, which are just as nightmarish and tainted by his obsession with death.
2nd Nov '16 6:41:38 PM MasterGhandalf
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* [[FromNobodyToNightmare Rhulad Sengar]] in the ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' has a magical sword that brings him back to life any time he dies, as well as granting supernatural strength and other magical abilities. Unfortunately, the sword was a gift from [[BigBad the Crippled God]], who never does a good turn for anyone without cost; Rhulad can't physically put the sword ''down'', his resurrections are incredibly physically and mentally agonizing (leading to SanitySlippage), and the first time around he was dead for several days and had already been dressed for burial before he came back - which, in his culture, involves having gold coins ritually sealed with hot wax across the entire body. When Rhulad resurrects, the coins [[BodyHorror stay attached]], with the exception of the ones on his eyelids. Add in the TraumaCongaLine that ensues after Rhulad gets the sword, and its small wonder he ends up half-mad and completely miserable, immortality or no.
11th Oct '16 9:10:48 PM PaulA
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** That last bit was actually averted in one of the Creator/BruceCoville story collections; after the main character and her friend test a forward-only time machine they find with a teddy bear, it never shows up. The lead decides to try it anyway, over the nerd's objections it's not safe. He has a EurekaMoment on the staircase and rushes back to stop her, but it's too late and she's transported into space.
10th Oct '16 7:33:07 PM somebob
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* Nine-year-old Jakey from ''Literature/EmilyTheStrangeTheLostDays''. He can read minds. Not only does it mean no one wants to be around him, lest he reads their minds, but it has also kept him away from home and mother for nearly all of his life, traveling with Attikol. Earwig even acknowledges she would not want to be around him after she got her memories back.
30th Sep '16 2:20:01 AM ladymoonshade
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* Having electricity powers might be awesome for combat, but ''Literature/UrbanDragon'''s Arkay has a bad habit of completely frying electronics every time she gets excited. And let's not get started on the static electricity: she wears a heavily-gelled pixie cut for a reason.
14th Sep '16 1:30:12 AM PaulA
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-->-'''[[Literature/NightLords Soul Hunter]]'''

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-->-'''[[Literature/NightLords -->-- '''[[Literature/NightLords Soul Hunter]]'''



** In the sequel ''Xenocide'', the ruling class of the planet Path consists of those blessed with OCD-like purification urges believed to be communications from the gods. These people appear to all be geniuses. Han Fei-Tzu and his daughter Han Qing-Jao [[PlayedForDrama struggle with this supposed honor and sometimes hate the gods for it]]. [[spoiler:Turns out it was a deliberate Blessing With Suck, as the interstellar government genetically engineered the "godspoken" to be smart but with something that mimics OCD; they use the religious aspect to control the geniuses.]]
** The ''Shadow'' spinoff series introduces the concept of "Anton's Key", a genetic modification that can give babies SuperIntelligence at the cost of dooming them to early deaths by gigantism, with all of the physical deformities that come with it. The Key puts children's bodies in a state of constant growth so that their brains never stop growing, allowing them to make huge leaps in intelligence, but it kills them by age 25 thanks to the SquareCubeLaw.

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** In the sequel ''Xenocide'', ''Literature/{{Xenocide}}'', the ruling class of the planet Path consists of those blessed with OCD-like purification urges believed to be communications from the gods. These people appear to all be geniuses. Han Fei-Tzu and his daughter Han Qing-Jao [[PlayedForDrama struggle with this supposed honor and sometimes hate the gods for it]]. [[spoiler:Turns out it was a deliberate Blessing With Suck, as the interstellar government genetically engineered the "godspoken" to be smart but with something that mimics OCD; they use the religious aspect to control the geniuses.]]
** The ''Shadow'' ''Literature/EndersShadow'' spinoff series introduces the concept of "Anton's Key", a genetic modification that can give babies SuperIntelligence at the cost of dooming them to early deaths by gigantism, with all of the physical deformities that come with it. The Key puts children's bodies in a state of constant growth so that their brains never stop growing, allowing them to make huge leaps in intelligence, but it kills them by age 25 thanks to the SquareCubeLaw.
14th Aug '16 6:18:28 AM aartbastiaan
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* At some point, the humans from Tolkien's Middle-Earth universe start considering their "Gift of Men" (meaning mortality) a curse. This was, of course, due to the corruptive influence of [[BigBad Sauron]] on the vastly powerful [[{{Atlantis}} Empire of Númenor]]. In the end, their envy of the long lives led by elves causes them to bring destruction upon themselves. The irony of it is that the Gift is wholly exclusive to Men, and that even the Valar, the most powerful beings in the universe (after Ilúvatar himself), are said to be envious of this gift. Men are the only beings not tied to the fate of the world, and who can leave it one day without having to worry about its future.

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* At some point, the humans from Tolkien's Middle-Earth universe start considering their "Gift of Men" (meaning mortality) a curse. This was, of course, due to the corruptive influence of [[BigBad Sauron]] on the vastly powerful [[{{Atlantis}} Empire of Númenor]]. In the end, their envy of the long lives led by elves causes them to bring destruction upon themselves. The irony of it is that the Gift is wholly exclusive to Men, and that even the Valar, the most powerful beings in the universe (after Ilúvatar [[{{God}} Ilúvatar]] himself), are said to be envious of this gift. Men are the only beings not tied to the fate of the world, and who can leave it one day without having to worry about its future.
14th Aug '16 6:14:15 AM aartbastiaan
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* At some point, the humans from Tolkien's Middle-Earth universe start considering their "Gift of Men" (meaning mortality) a curse. This was, of course, due to the corruptive influence of [[BigBad Sauron]] on the vastly powerful [[{{Atlantis}} Empire of Númenor]]. In the end, their envy of the long lives led by elves causes them to bring destruction upon themselves. The irony of it is that the Gift is wholly exclusive to Men, and that even the Valar, the most powerful beings in the universe (after Ilúvatar himself), are said to be envious of this gift. Men are the only beings not tied to the fate of the world, and who can leave it one day without having to worry about its future.
10th Jun '16 5:16:56 AM ChronoLegion
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* In ''Literature/SuperPowereds'', there are people with special abilities. Those that can control theirs are called Supers and can study to obtain a Hero License to become superheroes. Unfortunately, a sizable percentage of people with abilities are unable to exert reliable control over them. They are called Powered and are looked down upon by the Supers. For example, Vince has EnergyAbsorption and is introduced having accidentally drained an entire county of electricity when trying to fix his toaster. Nick can [[WindsOfDestinyChange manipulate luck]] (apparently, he can somehow manipulate [[QuantumMechanicsCanDoAnything quantum probabilities]], but he just calls it "luck" for simplicity), but it can either be good or bad luck. His introduction involves him winning a lottery, getting hit by a truck while celebrating, hitting a bouncy castle in his neighbor's yard, causing the castle's compressor to explode, with the lottery winnings exactly covering his hospital bills and the lawsuit against him by the neighbor (even though it wasn't his fault). He's pretty upbeat about it.

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* In ''Literature/SuperPowereds'', there are people with special abilities. Those that can control theirs are called Supers and can study to obtain a Hero License to become superheroes. Unfortunately, a sizable percentage of people with abilities are unable to exert reliable control over them. They are called Powered and are looked down upon by the Supers. For example, Vince has EnergyAbsorption and is introduced having accidentally drained an entire county of electricity when trying to fix his toaster. Nick can [[WindsOfDestinyChange manipulate luck]] (apparently, he can somehow manipulate [[QuantumMechanicsCanDoAnything quantum probabilities]], but he just calls it "luck" for simplicity), but it can either be good or bad luck. His introduction involves him winning a lottery, getting hit by a truck while celebrating, hitting a bouncy castle in his neighbor's yard, causing the castle's compressor to explode, with the lottery winnings exactly covering his hospital bills and the lawsuit against him by the neighbor (even though it wasn't his fault). He's pretty upbeat about it. They are recruited into a secret program to help them control their powers, thus turning them into Supers.
10th Jun '16 5:15:51 AM ChronoLegion
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/SuperPowereds'', there are people with special abilities. Those that can control theirs are called Supers and can study to obtain a Hero License to become superheroes. Unfortunately, a sizable percentage of people with abilities are unable to exert reliable control over them. They are called Powered and are looked down upon by the Supers. For example, Vince has EnergyAbsorption and is introduced having accidentally drained an entire county of electricity when trying to fix his toaster. Nick can [[WindsOfDestinyChange manipulate luck]] (apparently, he can somehow manipulate [[QuantumMechanicsCanDoAnything quantum probabilities]], but he just calls it "luck" for simplicity), but it can either be good or bad luck. His introduction involves him winning a lottery, getting hit by a truck while celebrating, hitting a bouncy castle in his neighbor's yard, causing the castle's compressor to explode, with the lottery winnings exactly covering his hospital bills and the lawsuit against him by the neighbor (even though it wasn't his fault). He's pretty upbeat about it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=BlessedWithSuck.Literature