History BLAM / ComicBooks

26th Apr '16 11:08:39 PM Furienna
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** The 33rd volume of the series, ''Asterix and the Falling Sky'', counts as a BLAM for the entire series. It's mostly about Asterix and Obelix witnessing the battle among two alien races who are [[ShallowParody shallow parodies]] of Walt Disney toons and American superhero comic books on one hand and Japanese anime and manga characters on the other. The shift from historical fantasy to Sci-Fi, the poorly-researched and mean-spirited jabs at superheroes and manga, the analogies to the Bush administration's handling of the 2003 Iraq War in the behavior of the USA-like aliens, all ensured that this one volume was the single most despised one in the entire franchise.
26th Feb '16 2:35:01 AM Silverblade2
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Added DiffLines:

** In the same book, after the two bad guy falls from the boat and drown, there's a pannel showing the bad guys being [[DraggedOffToHell dragged off by black devils]] which is really out of place for the genre of the series.
28th Jan '16 5:42:04 AM WoodyAlien3rd
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Added DiffLines:

** The 33rd volume of the series, ''Asterix and the Falling Sky'', counts as a BLAM for the entire series. It's mostly about Asterix and Obelix witnessing the battle among two alien races who are [[ShallowParody shallow parodies]] of Walt Disney toons and American superhero comic books on one hand and Japanese anime and manga characters on the other. The shift from historical fantasy to Sci-Fi, the poorly-researched and mean-spirited jabs at superheroes and manga, the analogies to the Bush administration's handling of the 2003 Iraq War in the behavior of the USA-like aliens, all ensured that this one volume was the single most despised one in the entire franchise.
12th Jan '16 10:41:41 AM AHI-3000
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* Soon after the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks, ''TheBoondocks'' dropped its regular cast and storylines in favor of "The Adventures Of Flagee and Ribbon," a pair of talking red, white, and blue patriotism props that provided social commentary measurably less subtle than the strip's standard narrative for a number of weeks before the strip returned to normal.

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* Soon after the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks, ''TheBoondocks'' ''ComicStrip/TheBoondocks'' dropped its regular cast and storylines in favor of "The Adventures Of of Flagee and Ribbon," a pair of talking red, white, and blue patriotism props that provided social commentary measurably less subtle than the strip's standard narrative for a number of weeks before the strip returned to normal.
30th Nov '15 8:54:21 AM StFan
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* Just as Operation: Zero Tolerance was starting in the ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' books, Jean is briefly [=KOed=]... the beginning of the next issue shows her meeting with Iron Man (who, along with half of the Marvel Universe, was presumed dead but had actually been sucked into a new universe). Before either of them can secure any answers, Jean is pulled back to Marvel 616 proper and this scene is never mentioned again. WordOfGod says this scene (and a few other power freak-outs Jean experienced) was supposed to have more relevance, but they dropped the plot point completely after the other Heroes returned.

to:

* Just as Operation: Zero Tolerance was starting in the ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'' ''ComicBook/XMen'' books, Jean is briefly [=KOed=]... the beginning of the next issue shows her meeting with Iron Man (who, along with half of the Marvel Universe, was presumed dead but had actually been sucked into a new universe). Before either of them can secure any answers, Jean is pulled back to Marvel 616 proper and this scene is never mentioned again. WordOfGod says this scene (and a few other power freak-outs Jean experienced) was supposed to have more relevance, but they dropped the plot point completely after the other Heroes returned.



* ''ComicStrip/{{Crankshaft}}'' has a week-long series (starting [[http://www.chron.com/apps/comics/showComick.mpl?date=20090720&name=Crankshaft here]]) that featured a much older Ed Crankshaft living in a nursing home combined with flashbacks to various baseball-related points in his life. Readers speculated that it was another "leap forward" similar to the one that had recently been done in ''ComicStrip/FunkyWinkerbean''; others wondered if it was the beginning of the strip's conclusion. The next week, everything is back to normal. But [[StatusQuoIsGod what else would you expect in a newspaper comic?]] The real reason for the week was that co-writer Tom Batiuk (also the man behind FunkyWinkerbean) had recently lost his father, and the week's strips were a reflection on that (Ed Crankshaft was partly inspired by the elder Mr Batiuk).

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* ''ComicStrip/{{Crankshaft}}'' has a week-long series (starting [[http://www.chron.com/apps/comics/showComick.mpl?date=20090720&name=Crankshaft here]]) that featured a much older Ed Crankshaft living in a nursing home combined with flashbacks to various baseball-related points in his life. Readers speculated that it was another "leap forward" similar to the one that had recently been done in ''ComicStrip/FunkyWinkerbean''; others wondered if it was the beginning of the strip's conclusion. The next week, everything is back to normal. But [[StatusQuoIsGod what else would you expect in a newspaper comic?]] The real reason for the week was that co-writer Tom Batiuk (also the man behind FunkyWinkerbean) ''Funky Winkerbean'') had recently lost his father, and the week's strips were a reflection on that (Ed Crankshaft was partly inspired by the elder Mr Batiuk).
20th Nov '15 11:40:41 AM StFan
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* ''{{Crankshaft}}'' had a week-long series (starting [[http://www.chron.com/apps/comics/showComick.mpl?date=20090720&name=Crankshaft here]]) that featured a much older Ed Crankshaft living in a nursing home combined with flashbacks to various baseball-related points in his life. Readers speculated that it was another "leap forward" similar to the one that had recently been done in ''FunkyWinkerbean''; others wondered if it was the beginning of the strip's conclusion. The next week, everything is back to normal. But [[StatusQuoIsGod what else would you expect in a newspaper comic?]]
** The real reason for the week was that co-writer Tom Batiuk (also the man behind FunkyWinkerbean) had recently lost his father, and the week's strips were a reflection on that (Ed Crankshaft was partly inspired by the elder Mr Batiuk).
* The infamous, week-long, 1989 ''{{Garfield}}'' run "Garfield Alone" was a particularly creepy example of this. Garfield wakes up to find himself in an alternate reality where Odie and Jon are nowhere to be seen and he's all alone in a boarded-up, run-down, old uninhabited house, tormented by loneliness.
** It should be noted that the sequence ends with Garfield seemingly willing himself into believing everything is back to normal, and thus the comic continues as if nothing ever happened. A popular interpretation is that everything that happens after this storyline is the result of Garfield's willful denial of reality, and that we've since been watching the delusions of a cat in an empty house who is slowly starving to death. This individual BLAM moment may have the unintended effect of turning the last 20 years of the comic into pure terror.
** WordOfGod denied this interpretation.
** ''Webcomic/GarfieldMinusGarfield'' then comes along later and turns it on its head...

to:

* ''{{Crankshaft}}'' had ''ComicStrip/{{Crankshaft}}'' has a week-long series (starting [[http://www.chron.com/apps/comics/showComick.mpl?date=20090720&name=Crankshaft here]]) that featured a much older Ed Crankshaft living in a nursing home combined with flashbacks to various baseball-related points in his life. Readers speculated that it was another "leap forward" similar to the one that had recently been done in ''FunkyWinkerbean''; ''ComicStrip/FunkyWinkerbean''; others wondered if it was the beginning of the strip's conclusion. The next week, everything is back to normal. But [[StatusQuoIsGod what else would you expect in a newspaper comic?]]
**
comic?]] The real reason for the week was that co-writer Tom Batiuk (also the man behind FunkyWinkerbean) had recently lost his father, and the week's strips were a reflection on that (Ed Crankshaft was partly inspired by the elder Mr Batiuk).
* The infamous, week-long, 1989 ''{{Garfield}}'' ''ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}'' run "Garfield Alone" was a particularly creepy example of this. Garfield wakes up to find himself in an alternate reality where Odie and Jon are nowhere to be seen and he's all alone in a boarded-up, run-down, old uninhabited house, tormented by loneliness.
**
loneliness. It should be noted that the sequence ends with Garfield seemingly willing himself into believing everything is back to normal, and thus the comic continues as if nothing ever happened. A popular interpretation is that everything that happens after this storyline is the result of Garfield's willful denial of reality, and that we've since been watching the delusions of a cat in an empty house who is slowly starving to death. This individual BLAM moment may have the unintended effect of turning the last 20 years of the comic into pure terror.
**
terror. WordOfGod denied this interpretation.
**
interpretation. ''Webcomic/GarfieldMinusGarfield'' then comes along later and turns it on its head...
8th Nov '15 6:28:53 AM oknazevad
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Added DiffLines:

**The real reason for the week was that co-writer Tom Batiuk (also the man behind FunkyWinkerbean) had recently lost his father, and the week's strips were a reflection on that (Ed Crankshaft was partly inspired by the elder Mr Batiuk).
3rd Nov '15 3:24:49 PM nombretomado
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* Even TheDarkPhoenixSaga, the biggest, most talked-about event in ComicBook/{{X-Men}} history, isn't free of these...in this case, it's "The Dramatic Debut Of The ComicBook/{{Dazzler}}!", wherein Cyclops and Phoenix meet the titular Dazzler thanks to ExecutiveMeddling trying to create a multimedia superhero in the form of an IdolSinger. Although she became a fairly popular character in her own right later, the story of her introduction makes little sense in the larger context of the story being told.

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* Even TheDarkPhoenixSaga, ComicBook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga, the biggest, most talked-about event in ComicBook/{{X-Men}} ComicBook/XMen history, isn't free of these...in this case, it's "The Dramatic Debut Of The ComicBook/{{Dazzler}}!", wherein Cyclops and Phoenix meet the titular Dazzler thanks to ExecutiveMeddling trying to create a multimedia superhero in the form of an IdolSinger. Although she became a fairly popular character in her own right later, the story of her introduction makes little sense in the larger context of the story being told.
21st Sep '15 11:29:57 AM fq
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* ''ComicBook/MarvelZombies 3'' contains a scene where a superhero named Captain Mexica (who comes from an alternate timeline where the Aztec empire never fell) becomes infected and eats people, as he was a specimen collected for Earth-616. He is eventually cut in half by Machine Man. Of course, no-one ever discusses him before or after his appearances.
** Of course, you can briefly see Captain Mexica in a flashback to the BLAM a few pages after Morbius starts video taping himself, dunno if that effects its [=BLAMness=] or not...

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* ''ComicBook/MarvelZombies 3'' contains a scene where a superhero named Captain Mexica (who comes from an alternate timeline where the Aztec empire never fell) becomes infected and eats people, as he was a specimen collected for Earth-616. He is eventually cut in half by Machine Man. Of course, no-one ever discusses him before or after his appearances.
** Of course, you can briefly see Captain Mexica in
appearances. His only other appearance is a brief flashback to the BLAM a few pages after Morbius starts video taping himself, dunno if that effects its [=BLAMness=] or not...himself.
7th Sep '15 6:31:27 PM nombretomado
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* Tentative, as it wasn't used in the final version, but Don Simpson's adaptation of ''Film/KingKong1933'' was originally to include a scene of Kong encountering the {{Hindenburg}} during his climb up the Empire State Building, whereupon he punches it out of the sky after becoming "instinctively enraged" at the sight of the Nazi swastikas on it, which is ironic given that Hitler's favourite movie was reportedly ''Film/KingKong1933''.

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* Tentative, as it wasn't used in the final version, but Don Simpson's adaptation of ''Film/KingKong1933'' was originally to include a scene of Kong encountering the {{Hindenburg}} UsefulNotes/TheHindenburg during his climb up the Empire State Building, whereupon he punches it out of the sky after becoming "instinctively enraged" at the sight of the Nazi swastikas on it, which is ironic given that Hitler's favourite movie was reportedly ''Film/KingKong1933''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=BLAM.ComicBooks