History BLAM / ComicBooks

8th Aug '17 12:12:01 PM TheNerevarine
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* ''ComicBook/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' Year One had a scene where ComicBook/{{Darkseid}} is shown to have captured and tortured the Black Racer, TheGrimReaper figure of the ComicBook/NewGods. How exactly did Darkseid managed to put his hands on the Racer is not explained, and neither its shown what happened to him afterwards in the following Darkseid appearances in the book, making the point of this scene completely baffling to readers.
25th Nov '16 3:13:49 PM Furienna
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* ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}''

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* ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}''''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'':
24th Nov '16 5:57:01 PM Furienna
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* Franchise/{{Tintin}}''

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* Franchise/{{Tintin}}''''Franchise/{{Tintin}}''
24th Nov '16 8:49:03 AM Furienna
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* The ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'' series has a mild one in ''The Broken Ear''. An absent-minded professor leaves his house wearing his wife's overcoat and holding a cane like an umbrella, comes across a parrot, then mistakes it for a person when it speaks. It is a parrot that Tintin is trying to recapture, but there is no interaction with any of the other characters in the story while this vignette is going on, and it adds nothing to advance the story (the parrot has already been shown speaking, so it's not even that). Hergé in his fondness for absent-minded professors probably just wanted to throw in a moment of [[RuleOfFunny comic relief]].
** In the same book, after the two bad guy falls from the boat and drown, there's a pannel showing the bad guys being [[DraggedOffToHell dragged off by black devils]] which is really out of place for the genre of the series.

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* The ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'' series has a mild one in Franchise/{{Tintin}}''
**
''The Broken Ear''. An Ear'' has one where an absent-minded professor leaves his house wearing his wife's overcoat and holding a cane like an umbrella, when he comes across a parrot, then parrot and mistakes it for a person when it speaks. It is a parrot that Tintin is trying to recapture, but there is no interaction with any of the other characters in the story while this vignette is going on, and it adds nothing to advance the story (the parrot has already been shown speaking, so it's not even that). Hergé in his fondness for absent-minded professors probably just wanted to throw in a moment of [[RuleOfFunny comic relief]].
** In the same book, after the two bad guy falls from the boat and drown, there's a pannel showing the bad guys them being [[DraggedOffToHell dragged off DraggedOffToHell by three little black devils]] devils, which is really out of place for the genre of the series.series.
** ''Tintin in Tibet'' has a short sequence, where Tintin hears something moving up a tree and gets a soggy fruit thrown into his face. Then the story just continues, before we even get to know ''who'' threw that fruit at Tintin.
27th Oct '16 1:50:41 PM morenohijazo
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* ''ComicBook/MortadeloYFilemon'': In the animated series episode "La venganza de Tengo-Pis", equivalent to the comic book "El premio No-Vel", Filemón accidentally squashes a policeman's nose between two bricks (ItMakesSenseInContext), so the cop starts hitting him with his nightstick. This is just like the comic book, but at that moment the series deviates from it. Seeing that Filemón is being defenselessly beaten, Mortadelo turns into a dog and tries to disarm the cop, managing to free Filemón. The two TIA agents then brawl with the cop, getting the upper hand by pulling his ear and flattened nose, and then they stretch and strecht (with the poor guy screaming in a truly creepy way) until there is an explosion filling the camera and the scene cuts to Mortadelo and Filemón laughing. The incident is never explained or mentioned, and the spectator only gets the gruesome implication, rather out of context for the series's level of violence, that they ripped out his ear and nose or something worse.
19th Jun '16 8:18:33 PM nombretomado
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* CrisisCrossover events that affect unrelated comic series will often result in these for readers of those periphery titles. An {{egregious}} example was in the second arc of ''[[{{Thunderbolts}} New Thunderbolts]]'', when the story gets interrupted in the middle of a battle by ''House of M'' so that the series can shift to a story in another reality that is loosely connected to the actual series only by thematic similarities. The recap page of the next issue has the arc's villain, the Purple Man (who had thus far been describing himself as a writer) complaining that [[BitingTheHandHumor his story was interrupted by some bizarre intrusion that had nothing to do with what he had planned]].

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* CrisisCrossover events that affect unrelated comic series will often result in these for readers of those periphery titles. An {{egregious}} example was in the second arc of ''[[{{Thunderbolts}} ''[[ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}} New Thunderbolts]]'', when the story gets interrupted in the middle of a battle by ''House of M'' so that the series can shift to a story in another reality that is loosely connected to the actual series only by thematic similarities. The recap page of the next issue has the arc's villain, the Purple Man (who had thus far been describing himself as a writer) complaining that [[BitingTheHandHumor his story was interrupted by some bizarre intrusion that had nothing to do with what he had planned]].
26th Apr '16 11:08:39 PM Furienna
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** The 33rd volume of the series, ''Asterix and the Falling Sky'', counts as a BLAM for the entire series. It's mostly about Asterix and Obelix witnessing the battle among two alien races who are [[ShallowParody shallow parodies]] of Walt Disney toons and American superhero comic books on one hand and Japanese anime and manga characters on the other. The shift from historical fantasy to Sci-Fi, the poorly-researched and mean-spirited jabs at superheroes and manga, the analogies to the Bush administration's handling of the 2003 Iraq War in the behavior of the USA-like aliens, all ensured that this one volume was the single most despised one in the entire franchise.
26th Feb '16 2:35:01 AM Silverblade2
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** In the same book, after the two bad guy falls from the boat and drown, there's a pannel showing the bad guys being [[DraggedOffToHell dragged off by black devils]] which is really out of place for the genre of the series.
28th Jan '16 5:42:04 AM WoodyAlien3rd
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Added DiffLines:

** The 33rd volume of the series, ''Asterix and the Falling Sky'', counts as a BLAM for the entire series. It's mostly about Asterix and Obelix witnessing the battle among two alien races who are [[ShallowParody shallow parodies]] of Walt Disney toons and American superhero comic books on one hand and Japanese anime and manga characters on the other. The shift from historical fantasy to Sci-Fi, the poorly-researched and mean-spirited jabs at superheroes and manga, the analogies to the Bush administration's handling of the 2003 Iraq War in the behavior of the USA-like aliens, all ensured that this one volume was the single most despised one in the entire franchise.
12th Jan '16 10:41:41 AM AHI-3000
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* Soon after the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks, ''TheBoondocks'' dropped its regular cast and storylines in favor of "The Adventures Of Flagee and Ribbon," a pair of talking red, white, and blue patriotism props that provided social commentary measurably less subtle than the strip's standard narrative for a number of weeks before the strip returned to normal.

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* Soon after the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks, ''TheBoondocks'' ''ComicStrip/TheBoondocks'' dropped its regular cast and storylines in favor of "The Adventures Of of Flagee and Ribbon," a pair of talking red, white, and blue patriotism props that provided social commentary measurably less subtle than the strip's standard narrative for a number of weeks before the strip returned to normal.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=BLAM.ComicBooks