History AwesomeButImpractical / Literature

10th Sep '16 11:41:14 AM Discar
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* Kaladin's spear katas in ''Literature/TheWayOfKings''. He himself admits that they're only designed to stretch the muscles and get you used to handling a spear, and would be totally useless in an actual fight. On the other hand, the Awesome part proves to be of some practical use, as demonstrating his [[MasterSwordsman Master Spearman]] skills and his [[PowerGlows shiny]] new Surgebinding powers helps cement the loyalty of his followers.


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* ''Literature/TheWayOfKings'' (first book of ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive''): Kaladin's spear katas. He himself admits that they're only designed to stretch the muscles and get you used to handling a spear, and would be totally useless in an actual fight. On the other hand, the Awesome part proves to be of some practical use, as demonstrating his [[MasterSwordsman Master Spearman]] skills and his [[PowerGlows shiny]] new Surgebinding powers helps cement the loyalty of his followers.
31st Aug '16 6:54:05 AM Malady
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* Creator/ArthurCClarke's short story "[[http://www.mayofamily.com/RLM/txt_Clarke_Superiority.html Literature/Superiority]]" is about AwesomeButImpractical means of warfare hilariously turning almost inevitable victory into utter chaos and failure.

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* Creator/ArthurCClarke's short story "[[http://www.''Literature/{{Superiority}}'' ([[http://www.mayofamily.com/RLM/txt_Clarke_Superiority.html Literature/Superiority]]" Link.]]) is about AwesomeButImpractical means of warfare hilariously turning almost inevitable victory into utter chaos and failure.
31st Aug '16 6:41:59 AM Malady
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* Bryn's [[WolverineClaws Wolverine Gauntlets]] from ''Raised by Wolves''. The claws are silver, and extend and retract via a quick twist of the wrist. The only time they're used in combat, [[spoiler: the enemy figures out how they work and neutralizes them by grabbing Bryn's wrist and twisting them to the retracted position.]] Made more annoying by the fact that Bryn was already carrying around [[KnifeNut two perfectly good silver knives]] when she got the gauntlets.
* In ''DarkHeavens'', Emma is unexpectedly able to generate an ultra-rare black chi that can instantly annihilate demons, or turn them human... sometimes. Other times, it does nothing at all. Emma eventually decides that it's too unpredictable to be useful, and stops using it... [[ChekhovsGun for now]].

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* Bryn's [[WolverineClaws Wolverine Gauntlets]] from ''Raised by Wolves''.''Literature/RaisedByWolves''. The claws are silver, and extend and retract via a quick twist of the wrist. The only time they're used in combat, [[spoiler: the enemy figures out how they work and neutralizes them by grabbing Bryn's wrist and twisting them to the retracted position.]] Made more annoying by the fact that Bryn was already carrying around [[KnifeNut two perfectly good silver knives]] when she got the gauntlets.
* In ''DarkHeavens'', ''Literature/DarkHeavens'', Emma is unexpectedly able to generate an ultra-rare black chi that can instantly annihilate demons, or turn them human... sometimes. Other times, it does nothing at all. Emma eventually decides that it's too unpredictable to be useful, and stops using it... [[ChekhovsGun for now]].



* In ''TheElenium'', the undead soldiers created by Otha. While they ''look'' like an undefeatable regiment of unkillable warriors in ScaryImpracticalArmor, there turn out to be two crippling problems with them: 1. Their armor really is ''impractical''. The guys making it didn't understand armor had a purpose beyond looking scary, so they made armor that looked really scary but was restrictive, didn't deflect blades properly, and was too thin. 2. Otha is a moron. He has the power to raise the dead, but no idea what to do with it. The soldiers are set to guard the stone they're standing on, and that's all. The heroes win by just walking around them. Then because it didn't occur to Otha that his soldiers should be selective in their targets, they chuck a rock at one soldier causing it to enter the square of another, and the DisasterDominoes set the entire regiment fighting each other.
* The Aeyrie, batlike {{winged humanoid}}s in Laurie J. Marks's ''Children of Triad'' trilogy, are described as such—by [[ThisLoserIsYou one of their own]], no less—in the second book: Between the weight of the musculature required to get something roughly human-sized aloft, and the hollow bones and general frailty required to compensate for said weight, they're "too heavy to fly easily, yet too light to do anything else."

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* In ''TheElenium'', ''Literature/TheElenium'', the undead soldiers created by Otha. While they ''look'' like an undefeatable regiment of unkillable warriors in ScaryImpracticalArmor, there turn out to be two crippling problems with them: 1. Their armor really is ''impractical''. The guys making it didn't understand armor had a purpose beyond looking scary, so they made armor that looked really scary but was restrictive, didn't deflect blades properly, and was too thin. 2. Otha is a moron. He has the power to raise the dead, but no idea what to do with it. The soldiers are set to guard the stone they're standing on, and that's all. The heroes win by just walking around them. Then because it didn't occur to Otha that his soldiers should be selective in their targets, they chuck a rock at one soldier causing it to enter the square of another, and the DisasterDominoes set the entire regiment fighting each other.
* The Aeyrie, batlike {{winged humanoid}}s in Laurie J. Marks's ''Children of Triad'' ''Literature/ChildrenOfTriad'' trilogy, are described as such—by [[ThisLoserIsYou one of their own]], no less—in the second book: Between the weight of the musculature required to get something roughly human-sized aloft, and the hollow bones and general frailty required to compensate for said weight, they're "too heavy to fly easily, yet too light to do anything else."



* ''[[InfinityPlusOneSword Callandor]]'' in the ''WheelOfTime'' is an extremely powerful AmplifierArtifact, but it was built without the normal safeguards in place on artifacts of its type. [[spoiler: Both times [[DarkMessiah Rand]] uses it at full power, he ends up with temporary delusions of godhood and starts doing insane things. It's later revealed that ''Callandor'''s flaw is actually a deliberately designed trap, and proves crucial to Rand's plan for winning the Last Battle]].

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* ''[[InfinityPlusOneSword Callandor]]'' in the ''WheelOfTime'' ''Literature/WheelOfTime'' is an extremely powerful AmplifierArtifact, but it was built without the normal safeguards in place on artifacts of its type. [[spoiler: Both times [[DarkMessiah Rand]] uses it at full power, he ends up with temporary delusions of godhood and starts doing insane things. It's later revealed that ''Callandor'''s flaw is actually a deliberately designed trap, and proves crucial to Rand's plan for winning the Last Battle]].



* Creator/ArthurCClarke's short story "[[http://www.mayofamily.com/RLM/txt_Clarke_Superiority.html Superiority]]" is about AwesomeButImpractical means of warfare hilariously turning almost inevitable victory into utter chaos and failure.

to:

* Creator/ArthurCClarke's short story "[[http://www.mayofamily.com/RLM/txt_Clarke_Superiority.html Superiority]]" Literature/Superiority]]" is about AwesomeButImpractical means of warfare hilariously turning almost inevitable victory into utter chaos and failure.



* ''StarWarsExpandedUniverse''

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* ''StarWarsExpandedUniverse''''Literature/StarWarsExpandedUniverse''



* Offensive magic in the HarryPotter universe generally falls under this trope. The Killing Curses, Forbidden Curses and even more mundane magic attacks tend to pale alongside modern firearms save for situations where the target are immune to anything else. [[WordOfGod Rowling herself]] maintains there's a reason muggles with guns still rule the world (well, [[ExplosiveBreeder one of two reasons]]).

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* Offensive magic in the HarryPotter ''Literature/HarryPotter'' universe generally falls under this trope. The Killing Curses, Forbidden Curses and even more mundane magic attacks tend to pale alongside modern firearms save for situations where the target are immune to anything else. [[WordOfGod Rowling herself]] maintains there's a reason muggles with guns still rule the world (well, [[ExplosiveBreeder one of two reasons]]).



** It's the ''mundane'' aspects of the wizard world which are less practical than [[MugglesDoItBetter what muggles use]]. Like kneeling down at a fireplace and sending your head through it for a conversation instead of simply using the phone. This is even lampshaded at one point concerning the use of owls in the ministry of magic, due to the problem of owl droppings. Enchanting the missiles into paper birds which fly to the right place instead is certainly a solution, but a computer system would be an even better one. Somewhat {{justified}} due to the "magic is an EMP" subtype of MagicVersusTechnology being in play: [[NecessaryDrawback you have to choose]] between the advantages of using tech and the advantages of using magic in any given area. Want to teleport to work and skip the commute? Then you'll have to deal with sharing the elevator with a bunch of enchanted paper airplanes, because email won't work. It's not at all clear why they can't use magic to get the same effect however, especially since making mundane objects intelligent and at least partly sentient is commonplace. For instance, the students occasionally used the paintings to run messages and at least two of the dorms were protected by paintings asking for passwords.
* Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's ''Always Coming Home'' features a post-industrial society where most societies manage without advanced technology. One expansionist state decided to look up ancient weapon designs on the Internet (there are AI's maintaining a version of it - in a book published in 1985). Since their society has a religion based around condors, they make a few military planes. However, it's a PostPeakOil world, and they find out rather quickly that it's very hard to expand when all the food has been converted into biofuel...

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** It's the ''mundane'' aspects of the wizard world which are less practical than [[MugglesDoItBetter what muggles use]]. Like kneeling down at a fireplace and sending your head through it for a conversation instead of simply using the phone. This is even lampshaded at one point concerning the use of owls in the ministry Ministry of magic, Magic, due to the problem of owl droppings. Enchanting the missiles into paper birds which fly to the right place instead is certainly a solution, but a computer system would be an even better one. Somewhat {{justified}} due to the "magic is an EMP" subtype of MagicVersusTechnology being in play: [[NecessaryDrawback you have to choose]] between the advantages of using tech and the advantages of using magic in any given area. Want to teleport to work and skip the commute? Then you'll have to deal with sharing the elevator with a bunch of enchanted paper airplanes, because email won't work. It's not at all clear why they can't use magic to get the same effect however, especially since making mundane objects intelligent and at least partly sentient is commonplace. For instance, the students occasionally used the paintings to run messages and at least two of the dorms were protected by paintings asking for passwords.
* Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's ''Always Coming Home'' ''Literature/AlwaysComingHome'' features a post-industrial society where most societies manage without advanced technology. One expansionist state decided to look up ancient weapon designs on the Internet (there are AI's maintaining a version of it - in a book published in 1985). Since their society has a religion based around condors, they make a few military planes. However, it's a PostPeakOil world, and they find out rather quickly that it's very hard to expand when all the food has been converted into biofuel...



* The Literature/StarRiskLtd team once tried to hang onto a destroyer they bought and crewed for one of their jobs, but then one of their accountants took Freddy von Baldur aside to explain to him that they couldn't afford to maintain it if it wasn't earning any profit.

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* The Literature/StarRiskLtd ''Literature/StarRiskLtd'' team once tried to hang onto a destroyer they bought and crewed for one of their jobs, but then one of their accountants took Freddy von Baldur aside to explain to him that they couldn't afford to maintain it if it wasn't earning any profit.



* Literature/FlowersInTheAttic and its sequels mention a swan bed with custom made sheets.

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* Literature/FlowersInTheAttic ''Literature/FlowersInTheAttic'' and its sequels mention a swan bed with custom made sheets.



* In the {{Literature/Uplift}} universe, the Tandu races get around by using Episiarchs, a race that has the ability to [[RealityWarper temporarily alter reality by force of will]]. They open short-lived portals that allow Tandu ships to travel instantly to different areas, making them faster than about anything else in the Five Galaxies. It sounds awesome, but the other starfaring races refuse to use this method of travel because it's unstable beyond belief, sometimes randomly destroying ships or even whole fleets. The first time we see Episiarchs in action, they get the Tandu to a battlefield hours before anyone else. The second time, they cause a Tandu warship to ''implode''. Krat notes that the Tandu are the only major race crazy enough to think that the reward outweighs the risk.

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* In the {{Literature/Uplift}} ''Literature/{{Uplift}}'' universe, the Tandu races get around by using Episiarchs, a race that has the ability to [[RealityWarper temporarily alter reality by force of will]]. They open short-lived portals that allow Tandu ships to travel instantly to different areas, making them faster than about anything else in the Five Galaxies. It sounds awesome, but the other starfaring races refuse to use this method of travel because it's unstable beyond belief, sometimes randomly destroying ships or even whole fleets. The first time we see Episiarchs in action, they get the Tandu to a battlefield hours before anyone else. The second time, they cause a Tandu warship to ''implode''. Krat notes that the Tandu are the only major race crazy enough to think that the reward outweighs the risk.
9th Aug '16 8:31:40 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** It's the ''mundane'' aspects of the wizard world which are less practical than [[MugglesDoItBetter what muggles use]]. Like kneeling down at a fireplace and sending your head through it for a conversation instead of simply using the phone. This is even lampshaded at one point concerning the use of owls in the ministry of magic, due to the problem of owl droppings. Enchanting the missiles into paper birds which fly to the right place instead is certainly a solution, but a computer system would be an even better one. Somewhat {{justified}} due to the "magic is an EMP" subtype of MagicVersusTechnology being in play: [[NecessaryDrawback you have to choose]] between the advantages of using tech and the advantages of using magic in any given area. Want to teleport to work and skip the commute? Then you'll have to deal with sharing the elevator with a bunch of enchanted paper airplanes, because email won't work.

to:

** It's the ''mundane'' aspects of the wizard world which are less practical than [[MugglesDoItBetter what muggles use]]. Like kneeling down at a fireplace and sending your head through it for a conversation instead of simply using the phone. This is even lampshaded at one point concerning the use of owls in the ministry of magic, due to the problem of owl droppings. Enchanting the missiles into paper birds which fly to the right place instead is certainly a solution, but a computer system would be an even better one. Somewhat {{justified}} due to the "magic is an EMP" subtype of MagicVersusTechnology being in play: [[NecessaryDrawback you have to choose]] between the advantages of using tech and the advantages of using magic in any given area. Want to teleport to work and skip the commute? Then you'll have to deal with sharing the elevator with a bunch of enchanted paper airplanes, because email won't work. It's not at all clear why they can't use magic to get the same effect however, especially since making mundane objects intelligent and at least partly sentient is commonplace. For instance, the students occasionally used the paintings to run messages and at least two of the dorms were protected by paintings asking for passwords.
25th May '16 10:02:26 AM ImpudentInfidel
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** [[BigFancyCastle Harrenhal]] is another example. On the face of it, it's an awesomely solid defensive construction, most of which has managed to stand the test of time -- if rather badly scorched, melted and battered. However, it's also a massive ode to [[TheTower hubris writ in stone]]. Even if it hadn't met ruin-by-unforeseen-dragons trimming its available living space a fair bit, it'd ''still'' have been an impossible castle to supply, maintain and run properly thanks to the sheer scale of the damned thing, and due to the army of servants and/or serfs needed to keep it going. Let alone anything else, like unsupportable supply lines. The Riverlands and the Iron Isles would probably have been beggared and/or partiality depopulated and deforrested in just a couple of generations trying to make it work at its peak. As it is, even in its partially-used state, it's still TheMillstone around the neck of any poor, unsuspecting Family that gets given it as a "[[UnwantedGiftPlot reward]]" for services rendered. The Whents are only the latest Family to go under primarily due to its financial and logistical weight making them sitting ducks in the Game at the start of the series. The total list of Houses to fall to the place: Qoherys -- totally extinct; Towers -- extinct; Harroway -- extinct; Strong -- extinct (although the name does resurface from time to time, probably stolen), Lothston -- extinct; Whent -- extinct in the main, male line, although a side-branch still struggles along; House Slynt -- new and still going, [[spoiler: although utterly stripped of the title, though Lord Slynt was sent to the Wall and executed; and, last but not least, Baelish -- gods alone know how that's going to play out.]] Also misfortune happens to those that hold it, [[spoiler:Vargo Hoat, captured by the Mountain, who had pieces of him cut off each day and fed them to him, and the Mountain, who shortly after this was wounded and began dying from an incredibly painful but slow poison,]] though [[spoiler:he may have survived via necromancy.]] All this, in combination with the burning backstory and other notable historical disasters unrelated to actually running it, is why the common folk (and a few not-so-common) [[HauntedCastle consider the thing]] under an unspecified, if potent, {{Curse}}.

to:

** [[BigFancyCastle Harrenhal]] is another example. On the face of it, it's an awesomely solid defensive construction, most of which has managed to stand the test of time -- if rather badly scorched, melted and battered. However, it's also a massive ode to [[TheTower hubris writ in stone]]. Even if it hadn't met ruin-by-unforeseen-dragons trimming its available living space a fair bit, it'd ''still'' have been an impossible castle to supply, maintain and run properly thanks to the sheer scale of the damned thing, and due to the army of servants and/or serfs needed to keep it going. Let alone anything else, like unsupportable supply lines. The Riverlands and the Iron Isles would probably have been beggared and/or partiality depopulated and deforrested in just a couple of generations trying to make it work at its peak. As it is, even in its partially-used state, it's still TheMillstone around the neck of any poor, unsuspecting Family that gets given it as a "[[UnwantedGiftPlot reward]]" for services rendered. The Whents are only the latest Family to go under primarily due to its financial and logistical weight making them sitting ducks in the Game at the start of the series. The total list of Houses to fall to the place: Qoherys -- totally extinct; Towers -- extinct; Harroway -- extinct; Strong -- extinct (although the name does resurface from time to time, probably stolen), Lothston -- extinct; Whent -- extinct in the main, male line, although a side-branch still struggles along; House Slynt -- new and still going, [[spoiler: although utterly stripped of the title, though Lord Slynt was sent to the Wall and executed; and, last but not least, Baelish -- gods alone know how that's going to play out.out, but he's so far studiously avoided going anywhere near the damn thing.]] Also misfortune happens to those that hold it, [[spoiler:Vargo Hoat, captured by the Mountain, who had pieces of him cut off each day and fed them to him, and the Mountain, who shortly after this was wounded and began dying from an incredibly painful but slow poison,]] though [[spoiler:he may have survived via necromancy.]] All this, in combination with the burning backstory and other notable historical disasters unrelated to actually running it, is why the common folk (and a few not-so-common) [[HauntedCastle consider the thing]] under an unspecified, if potent, {{Curse}}.
2nd May '16 7:42:22 PM WiddershinsDaughter
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** Once missile pods were invented, they were mounted on two grades of warships: Superdreadnoughts and battlecruisers. Pod battlecruisers turned out to be fragile (when the pod core is fully worked out, it takes up the entire interior of the midships portion of the hull, leaving virtually no room for proper armor), easy to knock out of action, cramped, and in order to prop up salvo density, the missiles they carry are cruiser-weight rather than capital-weight.
** WordOfGod says that [[spoiler: LACs are a strategic dead-end]], making them this once navies have figured out a counter for them. Unlike BC(P)s, however, LACs still function as working area defense ships, helping larger and more important ships escape harm from extremely heavy pod missile salvos.
11th Mar '16 12:27:51 AM Euodiachloris
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** [[BigFancyCastle Harrenhal]] is another example. On the face of it, it's an awesomely solid defensive construction, most of which has managed to stand the test of time -- if rather badly scorched, melted and battered. However, it's also a massive ode to [[TheTower hubris writ in stone]]. Even if it hadn't met ruin-by-unforeseen-dragons trimming its available living space a fair bit, it'd ''still'' have been an impossible castle to supply, maintain and run properly due to the sheer scale of the damned thing, thanks to the number of bodies needed to keep it going, let alone anything else. The Riverlands and the Iron Isles would probably have been beggared and/or partiality depopulated in just a couple of generations trying to make it work at its peak. As it is, even in its partially-used state, it's still TheMillstone around the neck of any poor, unsuspecting Family that gets given it as a "[[UnwantedGiftPlot reward]]" for services rendered. The Whents are only the latest Family to go under primarily due to its financial and logistical weight making them sitting ducks in the Game at the start of the series. The total list of Houses to fall to the place: Qoherys -- totally extinct; Towers -- extinct; Harroway -- extinct; Strong -- extinct (although the name does resurface from time to time, probably stolen), Lothston -- extinct; Whent -- extinct in the main, male line, although a side-branch still struggles along; House Slynt -- new and still going, [[spoiler: although utterly stripped of the title, though Lord Slynt was sent to the Wall and executed; and, last but not least, Baelish -- gods alone know how that's going to play out.]] Also misfortune happens to those that hold it, [[spoiler:Vargo Hoat, captured by the Mountain, who had pieces of him cut off each day and fed them to him, and the Mountain, who shortly after this was wounded and began dying from an incredibly painful but slow poison,]] though [[spoiler:he may have survived via necromancy.]] All this, in combination with the burning backstory and other notable historical disasters, is why the common folk (and a few not-so-common) [[HauntedCastle consider the thing cursed]].

to:

** [[BigFancyCastle Harrenhal]] is another example. On the face of it, it's an awesomely solid defensive construction, most of which has managed to stand the test of time -- if rather badly scorched, melted and battered. However, it's also a massive ode to [[TheTower hubris writ in stone]]. Even if it hadn't met ruin-by-unforeseen-dragons trimming its available living space a fair bit, it'd ''still'' have been an impossible castle to supply, maintain and run properly due thanks to the sheer scale of the damned thing, thanks and due to the number army of bodies servants and/or serfs needed to keep it going, let going. Let alone anything else. else, like unsupportable supply lines. The Riverlands and the Iron Isles would probably have been beggared and/or partiality depopulated and deforrested in just a couple of generations trying to make it work at its peak. As it is, even in its partially-used state, it's still TheMillstone around the neck of any poor, unsuspecting Family that gets given it as a "[[UnwantedGiftPlot reward]]" for services rendered. The Whents are only the latest Family to go under primarily due to its financial and logistical weight making them sitting ducks in the Game at the start of the series. The total list of Houses to fall to the place: Qoherys -- totally extinct; Towers -- extinct; Harroway -- extinct; Strong -- extinct (although the name does resurface from time to time, probably stolen), Lothston -- extinct; Whent -- extinct in the main, male line, although a side-branch still struggles along; House Slynt -- new and still going, [[spoiler: although utterly stripped of the title, though Lord Slynt was sent to the Wall and executed; and, last but not least, Baelish -- gods alone know how that's going to play out.]] Also misfortune happens to those that hold it, [[spoiler:Vargo Hoat, captured by the Mountain, who had pieces of him cut off each day and fed them to him, and the Mountain, who shortly after this was wounded and began dying from an incredibly painful but slow poison,]] though [[spoiler:he may have survived via necromancy.]] All this, in combination with the burning backstory and other notable historical disasters, disasters unrelated to actually running it, is why the common folk (and a few not-so-common) [[HauntedCastle consider the thing cursed]].thing]] under an unspecified, if potent, {{Curse}}.
25th Feb '16 1:45:42 PM LentilSandEater
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** That ''[[ArtisticLicenseBiology might]]'' be true considering they're mammals (the very largest bats are only as big as medium-sized hawks), but ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentavis Argentavis magnificens]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haast%27s_Eagle Harpagornis moorei]]'', and several pterosaurs including ''Pteranodon'' and most of the azhdarchids, were roughly human-sized, sometimes significantly bigger (''Quetzalcoatlus northropii'' is the size of a small giraffe, at least in terms of dimensions), and they all flew.
14th Feb '16 2:52:32 AM Euodiachloris
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** [[BigFancyCastle Harrenhal]] is another example. On the face of it, it's an awesomely solid defensive construction, most of which has managed to stand the test of time -- if rather badly scorched and battered. However, it's also a massive ode to hubris writ in stone. Even if it hadn't met ruin-by-unforeseen-dragons trimming its available living space a fair bit, it'd ''still'' have been an impossible castle to supply, maintain and run properly due to the sheer scale of the damned thing and thanks to number of bodies needed to keep it going, let alone anything else. The Riverlands and the Iron Isles would probably have been beggared in just a couple of generations trying to make it work at its peak. As it is, even in its partially-used state, it's still TheMillstone around the neck of any poor, unsuspecting Family that gets given it as a "[[UnwantedGiftPlot reward]]" for services rendered. The Whents are only the latest Family to go under primarily due to its financial and logistical weight making them sitting ducks in the Game at the start of the series. The total list of Houses to fall to the place: Qoherys -- totally extinct; Towers -- extinct; Harroway -- extinct; Strong -- extinct (although the name does resurface from time to time, probably stolen), Lothston -- extinct; Whent -- extinct in the main, male line, although a side-branch still struggles along; House Slynt -- new and still going, [[spoiler: although utterly stripped of the title, though Lord Slynt was sent to the Wall and executed; and, last but not least, Baelish -- gods alone know how that's going to play out.]] Also misfortune happens to those that hold it, [[spoiler:Vargo Hoat, captured by the Mountain, who had pieces of him cut off each day and fed them to him, and the Mountain, who shortly after this was wounded and began dying from an incredibly painful but slow poison,]] though [[spoiler:he may have survived via necromancy.]] All this, in combination with the burning backstory and other notable historical disasters, is why the common folk (and a few not-so-common) [[HauntedCastle consider the thing cursed]].

to:

** [[BigFancyCastle Harrenhal]] is another example. On the face of it, it's an awesomely solid defensive construction, most of which has managed to stand the test of time -- if rather badly scorched scorched, melted and battered. However, it's also a massive ode to [[TheTower hubris writ in stone. stone]]. Even if it hadn't met ruin-by-unforeseen-dragons trimming its available living space a fair bit, it'd ''still'' have been an impossible castle to supply, maintain and run properly due to the sheer scale of the damned thing and thing, thanks to the number of bodies needed to keep it going, let alone anything else. The Riverlands and the Iron Isles would probably have been beggared and/or partiality depopulated in just a couple of generations trying to make it work at its peak. As it is, even in its partially-used state, it's still TheMillstone around the neck of any poor, unsuspecting Family that gets given it as a "[[UnwantedGiftPlot reward]]" for services rendered. The Whents are only the latest Family to go under primarily due to its financial and logistical weight making them sitting ducks in the Game at the start of the series. The total list of Houses to fall to the place: Qoherys -- totally extinct; Towers -- extinct; Harroway -- extinct; Strong -- extinct (although the name does resurface from time to time, probably stolen), Lothston -- extinct; Whent -- extinct in the main, male line, although a side-branch still struggles along; House Slynt -- new and still going, [[spoiler: although utterly stripped of the title, though Lord Slynt was sent to the Wall and executed; and, last but not least, Baelish -- gods alone know how that's going to play out.]] Also misfortune happens to those that hold it, [[spoiler:Vargo Hoat, captured by the Mountain, who had pieces of him cut off each day and fed them to him, and the Mountain, who shortly after this was wounded and began dying from an incredibly painful but slow poison,]] though [[spoiler:he may have survived via necromancy.]] All this, in combination with the burning backstory and other notable historical disasters, is why the common folk (and a few not-so-common) [[HauntedCastle consider the thing cursed]].
18th Jan '16 12:25:28 AM Baeraad555
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* ''Literature/MordantsNeed'': Most people go mad when passing through a "plain glass" (that is, a mirror reflecting a location in the world of Mordant as opposed to a location in another world). Those rare few Imagers who can do so while keeping their sanity can effectively teleport themselves to any place that they possess a glass that carries an Image of it - however, since it's [[note]]normally[[/note]] impossible to determine before creating a glass what Image it will hold, and there is no [[note]]commonly available[[/note]] way of making the return trip without having to physically travel back to the site of the mirror by mundane means, the ability has few practical applications except for providing a really good means of making quick escapes. Even so, it's considered the most difficult thing you can do with Imagery, and someone who has the ability is known as an Arch-Imager.
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