History Awesome / OlympicGames

23rd Apr '17 5:57:47 PM nombretomado
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* The home country had a bit of a rough start to the games, but they started to pick up the pace with a Rowing Gold and, of course, Bradley Wiggins winning the Men's Time Trial so soon after winning the TourDeFrance (in turn making him Britain's most decorated Olympian). Then came the velodrome. Out of a possible 10 gold medals, they took ''7'' (a disqualification cost them an 8th, they also took a silver and a bronze). No other country took more than ''1''. They also blew away more than a few world records in there.

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* The home country had a bit of a rough start to the games, but they started to pick up the pace with a Rowing Gold and, of course, Bradley Wiggins winning the Men's Time Trial so soon after winning the TourDeFrance UsefulNotes/TourDeFrance (in turn making him Britain's most decorated Olympian). Then came the velodrome. Out of a possible 10 gold medals, they took ''7'' (a disqualification cost them an 8th, they also took a silver and a bronze). No other country took more than ''1''. They also blew away more than a few world records in there.
6th Apr '17 7:12:18 PM GlitteringFlowers
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* The Lithuanian Aurimas Didzbalis celebrates his weightlifting bronze medal [[http://www.sbnation.com/2016/8/14/12472746/olympic-weightlifting-aurimas-didzbalis-lithuania-backflip with an incredible backflip.]]

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* The Lithuanian Aurimas Didzbalis celebrates his weightlifting bronze medal [[http://www.sbnation.com/2016/8/14/12472746/olympic-weightlifting-aurimas-didzbalis-lithuania-backflip [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXoRuTef5hw with an incredible backflip.]]



* Spanish [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolina_Mar%C3%ADn Carolina Marín]] becoming the first non-Asiatic woman to win the gold medal in badminton. After losing the first set.

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* Spanish [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolina_Mar%C3%ADn Carolina Marín]] becoming became the first non-Asiatic woman to win the gold medal in badminton. After losing the first set.
23rd Mar '17 2:13:29 PM DarcyFoster
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** What makes it doubly awesome? Those two gold medals were Chile's first two gold medals.
9th Mar '17 5:57:19 PM Hallwings
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* The Czech National Ice Hockey Team wins gold medal. In 1998, the NHL allowed for the first time to have a break for the Winter Olympics in Nagano. The national ice-hockey teams could -- for the first time ever -- send their very best players and build all star ideal teams, and Canada and the United States were nearly 100% sure that they would be playing the final. However, in the semi-finals, the USA lost to Russia and Canada was beaten by the Czech Republic in the nerve-biting shoot-outs. The Czech national team won the whole thing. The Czech national ice hockey team is usually solid and there are always some great players with lots of ice hockey heart, but Nagono took it UpToEleven. Needless to say, ''everybody'' in the Czech Republic was watching, ''every'' major square in Prague was full of people and ''everybody'' was participating (or at least watching) their welcoming ceremony. It created several [[MemeticMutation memes]] and started a new golden era of Czech ice hockey. It is fondly remembered as one of the most awesome moments of Czech sport ever.

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* The Czech National Ice Hockey Team wins gold medal. In 1998, the NHL allowed for the first time to have a break for the Winter Olympics in Nagano. The national ice-hockey teams could -- for the first time ever -- send their very best players and build all star ideal teams, and Canada and the United States were nearly 100% sure that they would be playing the final. However, in the semi-finals, the USA lost to Russia and Canada was beaten by the Czech Republic in the quarterfinals (with the Czechs four unanswered goals after being down 1-0 after the first period), and Canada was then beaten by the Czechs in the semis in a nerve-biting shoot-outs.shoot-out. The Czech national team won the whole thing. The Czech national ice hockey team is usually solid and there are always some great players with lots of ice hockey heart, but Nagono took it UpToEleven. Needless to say, ''everybody'' in the Czech Republic was watching, ''every'' major square in Prague was full of people and ''everybody'' was participating (or at least watching) their welcoming ceremony. It created several [[MemeticMutation memes]] and started a new golden era of Czech ice hockey. It is fondly remembered as one of the most awesome moments of Czech sport ever.
9th Mar '17 11:08:15 AM RoseAndHeather
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*** As predicted, Simone Biles got the gold in the all-around (the first time the same country has 4-peated that), becoming both the second African-American woman to win the all-around, as well as the second American gymnast to win both the team and the all-around at the Olympics. To put Simone's dominance in perspective, according to Olympic records, her margin of victory is larger than all the margins for the Women's All Around since 1980... ''combined.'' Biles also later earned gold on the vault, becoming the first US woman to do so (and by no small margin, either; she scored the two highest vaults in the competition, 15.900 and 16.033[[labelnote:*]]the next highest was a 15.533 by Giulia Steingrube of Switzerland, which gave the country its first ever gymnastics medal with the bronze[[/labelnote]]. She followed this up with a bronze on the balance beam, which could have been yet another gold had she not touched the beam in an effort not fall[[note]]She finished almost eight-tenths behind gold medalist Sanne Wevers, but that near-fall cost her half a point, plus likely several extra tenths in form deductions--although Sanne Wevers actually lowered the difficulty score of her routine by several tenths after Biles' mistake so as to not take needless risks, so it's hard to say who would've won[[/note]]), and capped off her Olympics with a fourth gold on floor exercise (just as dominatingly as she did in the vault -- it wasn't even close), tying the record for the most golds and the most medals won by a female gymnast in a single Games. And just to cap off the awesome, in the process she also did something that hadn't been done in twenty years, and only twice since 1972: she came in as the reigning world all-around champion and won the Olympic all-around.[[note]]Ludmilla Tourischeva, the 1972 Olympic champion, was the reigning world AA champion going into Munich; the next to accomplish the feat was 1995 world AA champion Lilia Podkopayeva, who also won the all-around in Atlanta.[[/note]]

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*** As predicted, Simone Biles got the gold in the all-around (the first time the same country has 4-peated that), becoming both the second African-American woman to win the all-around, as well as the second American gymnast to win both the team and the all-around at the Olympics. To put Simone's dominance in perspective, according to Olympic records, her margin of victory is larger than all the margins for the Women's All Around since 1980... ''combined.'' Biles also later earned gold on the vault, becoming the first US woman to do so (and by no small margin, either; she scored the two highest vaults in the competition, 15.900 and 16.033[[labelnote:*]]the 033[[note]]the next highest was a 15.533 by Giulia Steingrube Steingruber of Switzerland, which gave the country its first ever gymnastics medal with the bronze[[/labelnote]].bronze[[/note]]. She followed this up with a bronze on the balance beam, which could have been yet another gold had she not touched the beam in an effort not fall[[note]]She finished almost eight-tenths behind gold medalist Sanne Wevers, but that near-fall cost her half a point, plus likely several extra tenths in form deductions--although Sanne Wevers actually lowered the difficulty score of her routine by several tenths after Biles' mistake so as to not take needless risks, so it's hard to say who would've won[[/note]]), and capped off her Olympics with a fourth gold on floor exercise (just as dominatingly as she did in the vault -- it wasn't even close), tying the record for the most golds and the most medals won by a female gymnast in a single Games. And just to cap off the awesome, in the process she also did something that hadn't been done in twenty years, and only twice since 1972: she came in as the reigning world all-around champion and won the Olympic all-around.[[note]]Ludmilla Tourischeva, the 1972 Olympic champion, was the reigning world AA champion going into Munich; the next to accomplish the feat was 1995 world AA champion Lilia Podkopayeva, who also won the all-around in Atlanta.[[/note]]
9th Mar '17 11:07:18 AM RoseAndHeather
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*** As predicted, Simone Biles got the gold in the all-around (the first time the same country has 4-peated that), becoming both the second African-American woman to win the all-around, as well as the second American gymnast to win both the team and the all-around at the Olympics. To put the dominance of Simone Biles in perspective, according to Olympic records, her margin of victory is larger than all the margins for the Women's All Around since 1980...''combined''! Biles also later earned gold on the vault, becoming the first US woman to do so (and by no small margin, either; she scored the two highest vaults in the competition, 15.900 and 16.033; next highest was a 15.533 by Giulia Steingruber—to her credit, this gave Switzerland its first ever gymnastics medal with the bronze). She followed this up with a bronze on the balance beam (which could have been yet another gold had she not touched the beam in an effort not fall[[note]]She finished almost eight-tenths behind gold medalist Sanne Wevers, but that near-fall cost her half a point, plus likely several extra tenths in form deductions--although Sanne Wevers actually lowered the difficulty score of her routine by several tenths after Biles' mistake so as to not take needless risks, so it's hard to say who would've won[[/note]]), and capped off her Olympics with a fourth gold on floor exercise (just as dominantly as she did in the vault, it wasn't even close), tying the record for the most golds and the most medals won by a female gymnast in a single Games.
*** Meanwhile, teammate Aly Raisman made up for barely losing the bronze in London by getting the silver in the all-around, marking only the second time that US gymnasts have gone 1-2 in the all-round competition (Nastia Liukin and Shawn Johnson did so at the 2008 Games). Raisman was just fine with the silver (averting SecondPlaceIsForLosers) because she knew whom she was up against, and expressed the same sentiment about her silver medal in floor exercise.

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*** As predicted, Simone Biles got the gold in the all-around (the first time the same country has 4-peated that), becoming both the second African-American woman to win the all-around, as well as the second American gymnast to win both the team and the all-around at the Olympics. To put the Simone's dominance of Simone Biles in perspective, according to Olympic records, her margin of victory is larger than all the margins for the Women's All Around since 1980...''combined''! 1980... ''combined.'' Biles also later earned gold on the vault, becoming the first US woman to do so (and by no small margin, either; she scored the two highest vaults in the competition, 15.900 and 16.033; 033[[labelnote:*]]the next highest was a 15.533 by Giulia Steingruber—to her credit, this Steingrube of Switzerland, which gave Switzerland the country its first ever gymnastics medal with the bronze). bronze[[/labelnote]]. She followed this up with a bronze on the balance beam (which beam, which could have been yet another gold had she not touched the beam in an effort not fall[[note]]She finished almost eight-tenths behind gold medalist Sanne Wevers, but that near-fall cost her half a point, plus likely several extra tenths in form deductions--although Sanne Wevers actually lowered the difficulty score of her routine by several tenths after Biles' mistake so as to not take needless risks, so it's hard to say who would've won[[/note]]), and capped off her Olympics with a fourth gold on floor exercise (just as dominantly dominatingly as she did in the vault, vault -- it wasn't even close), tying the record for the most golds and the most medals won by a female gymnast in a single Games.
Games. And just to cap off the awesome, in the process she also did something that hadn't been done in twenty years, and only twice since 1972: she came in as the reigning world all-around champion and won the Olympic all-around.[[note]]Ludmilla Tourischeva, the 1972 Olympic champion, was the reigning world AA champion going into Munich; the next to accomplish the feat was 1995 world AA champion Lilia Podkopayeva, who also won the all-around in Atlanta.[[/note]]
*** Meanwhile, teammate Aly Raisman made up for barely losing the bronze in London by getting the silver in the all-around, marking only the second time that US gymnasts have gone 1-2 in the all-round competition (Nastia competition[[note]]Nastia Liukin and Shawn Johnson did so at the 2008 Games). Games[[/note]]. Raisman was [[SecondPlaceIsForWinners just fine with the silver (averting SecondPlaceIsForLosers) silver]] because she knew whom she was up against, and expressed the same sentiment about her silver medal in floor exercise.exercise. (During the run-up to the Games, Raisman jokingly lamented, "I'm the reigning Olympic champion on floor [exercise], my routine is ''harder'' than it was in 2012, and I ''still'' can't catch Simone!")
20th Feb '17 5:17:58 PM nombretomado
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** Another meta one for London 2012. After criticism from the right-wing media and rentaquotes (lead loudly and unsurprisingly by the ''[[BritishNewspapers Daily Mail]]'') saying it was too multicultural (basically saying there were too many black people, and that it was wrong to praise hardworking doctors and nurses because the NHS = socialism), an InternetBackdraft ensued, forcing a particularly controversial tabloid paper (again, the ''Daily Mail'') to edit the article, then eventually pull the article after several people chose to screenshot the article and point out what they'd said.

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** Another meta one for London 2012. After criticism from the right-wing media and rentaquotes (lead loudly and unsurprisingly by the ''[[BritishNewspapers ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers Daily Mail]]'') saying it was too multicultural (basically saying there were too many black people, and that it was wrong to praise hardworking doctors and nurses because the NHS = socialism), an InternetBackdraft ensued, forcing a particularly controversial tabloid paper (again, the ''Daily Mail'') to edit the article, then eventually pull the article after several people chose to screenshot the article and point out what they'd said.
9th Feb '17 2:23:53 PM Hallwings
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* Naim Süleymanoğlu winning his third consecutive gold medal in weightlifting in a historic battle against Greece's Valerios Leonidis, with the two of them setting records in the 64 kg division several times during the event (in the end, Leonidis set the clean and jerk record at 187.5 kilograms {which Süleymanoğlu also matched, but Leonidis held the record due to his lower body weight at the time}, while Süleymanoğlu set the combined record at 335 kilograms).
6th Feb '17 12:29:03 PM DarcyFoster
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* At the games themselves, the stand-out athlete was Fanny Blankers-Koen, a Dutch athlete who won four gold medals (the 100m, 200m, 80m hurdles and 4x100m relay). It is quite possible that she could have won more medals (she had six world records at the time of the Games), but the rules in force at the time prevented women from competing in more than three individual athletic events. Her feats were made more remarkable by the fact that she was written off because she was 30 years old - whilst still being involved in sports in your third decade is commonplace in 2017, it was virtually unheard of in the 1940s.

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* At the games themselves, the stand-out athlete was Fanny Blankers-Koen, a Dutch athlete who won four gold medals (the 100m, 200m, 80m hurdles and 4x100m relay). It is quite possible that she could have won more medals (she had six world records at the time of the Games), but the rules in force at the time prevented women from competing in more than three individual athletic events. Her feats were made more remarkable by the fact that she was written off because she was 30 years old - whilst still being involved in sports in your third fourth decade is commonplace in 2017, it was virtually unheard of in the 1940s.
6th Feb '17 11:55:18 AM DarcyFoster
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[[folder:London 1948]]
* The mere fact that a heavily bombed city in a virtually bankrupt country that was still rationing food was able to host the Olympic games ''at all''. No new venues were built, the male athletes stayed at Army and RAF barracks and the women at colleges in London.
* At the games themselves, the stand-out athlete was Fanny Blankers-Koen, a Dutch athlete who won four gold medals (the 100m, 200m, 80m hurdles and 4x100m relay). It is quite possible that she could have won more medals (she had six world records at the time of the Games), but the rules in force at the time prevented women from competing in more than three individual athletic events. Her feats were made more remarkable by the fact that she was written off because she was 30 years old - whilst still being involved in sports in your third decade is commonplace in 2017, it was virtually unheard of in the 1940s.
[[/folder]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 570. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Awesome.OlympicGames