History Awesome / LittleHouseOnThePrairie

14th Jul '17 6:23:58 AM Maddoxsort
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* The episode where Charles and Isaiah took on a dangerous job transporting nitroglycerin to a blasting site. It has the [[AnAesop corollary Aesop]] of anti-discrimination; among the group of nitroglycerine haulers is a black man who is a veteran with the job that takes the place of someone who gets cold feet, and used to being the butt of many racist comments and takes it all in stride, to the dismay of a white man who can't stand the idea of working with a Negro, let alone a snarky one. All the workers hired for the job also have to ride on the freight car because they didn't have seats paid for by the ones who hired them. By the end of the episode, the person who was picking on him has realized the man is of splendid character and worthy of respect. Unfortunately, one of the conductors on the train ride back to the station throws him out of the coach because he's black. Thus, he goes back to sitting on the freight car... and is soon joined by Charles and Isaiah, who quietly leave the coach in silent protest and look about a half a second away from beating the stuffing out of the acidic conductor. But the one fellow who originally picked on the black man lingers behind for a while, as though he decided to stay where he was... and then emerges on the freight car with an absolutely ''glorious'' one-liner:

to:

* The episode where Charles and Isaiah took on a dangerous job transporting nitroglycerin to a blasting site. It has the [[AnAesop corollary Aesop]] of anti-discrimination; among the group of nitroglycerine haulers is a black man who is a veteran with the job that takes the place of someone who gets cold feet, and used to being the butt of many racist comments and takes it all in stride, to the dismay of a white man who can't stand the idea of working with a Negro, let alone a snarky one. All the workers hired for the job also have to ride on the freight car because they didn't have seats paid for by the ones who hired them. By the end of the episode, the person who was picking on him has realized the man is of splendid character and worthy of respect. Now the group gets to take the train back home on board the passenger car. Unfortunately, one of the conductors on the train ride back to the station throws him out of the coach because he's black. Thus, he goes back to sitting on the freight car... and is soon joined by Charles and Isaiah, who quietly leave the coach in silent protest and look about a half a second away from beating the stuffing out of the acidic conductor. But the one fellow who originally picked on the black man lingers behind for a while, as though he decided to stay where he was... and then emerges on the freight car with an absolutely ''glorious'' one-liner:




to:

** From that same episode: a bunch of bandits try to steal the cargo from the group, but Isaiah tricks them into thinking he's thrown highly explosive nitroglycerin at them. Then he pops the cap off one canister and drinks it, revealing he filled some of the empty ones with moonshine, and they couldn't tell the difference.
14th Jul '17 6:20:55 AM Maddoxsort
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* The episode where Charles and Isaiah took on a dangerous job transporting nitroglycerin to a blasting site. It has the [[AnAesop corollary Aesop]] of anti-discrimination; among the group of nitroglycerine haulers is a black man who is a veteran with the job that takes the place of someone who gets cold feet, and used to being the butt of many racist comments and takes it all in stride, to the dismay of a man who can't stand the idea of working with a Negro. All the workers hired for the job also have to ride on the freight car because they didn't have seats paid for by the ones who hired them. By the end of the episode, the person who was picking on him has realized the man is of splendid character and worthy of respect. Unfortunately, one of the conductors on the train ride back to the station throws him out of the coach because he's black. Thus, he goes back to sitting on the freight car... and is soon joined by Charles and Isaiah, who quietly leave the coach in silent protest and look about a half a second away from beating the stuffing out of the acidic conductor. But the one fellow who originally picked on the black man lingers behind for a while, as though he decided to stay where he was... and then emerges on the freight car with an absolutely ''glorious'' one-liner:

to:

* The episode where Charles and Isaiah took on a dangerous job transporting nitroglycerin to a blasting site. It has the [[AnAesop corollary Aesop]] of anti-discrimination; among the group of nitroglycerine haulers is a black man who is a veteran with the job that takes the place of someone who gets cold feet, and used to being the butt of many racist comments and takes it all in stride, to the dismay of a white man who can't stand the idea of working with a Negro.Negro, let alone a snarky one. All the workers hired for the job also have to ride on the freight car because they didn't have seats paid for by the ones who hired them. By the end of the episode, the person who was picking on him has realized the man is of splendid character and worthy of respect. Unfortunately, one of the conductors on the train ride back to the station throws him out of the coach because he's black. Thus, he goes back to sitting on the freight car... and is soon joined by Charles and Isaiah, who quietly leave the coach in silent protest and look about a half a second away from beating the stuffing out of the acidic conductor. But the one fellow who originally picked on the black man lingers behind for a while, as though he decided to stay where he was... and then emerges on the freight car with an absolutely ''glorious'' one-liner:
14th Jul '17 6:20:20 AM Maddoxsort
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* The episode where Charles and Isaiah took on a dangerous job transporting nitroglycerin to a blasting site. It has the [[AnAesop corollary Aesop]] of a black man who is used to being the butt of many racist comments and takes it all in stride, and all the workers hired for the job have to ride on the freight car because they didn't have seats paid for by the ones who hired them. By the end of the episode, the person who was picking on him has realized the man is of splendid character and worthy of respect. Unfortunately, one of the conductors on the train ride back to the station throws him out of the coach because he's black. Thus, he goes back to sitting on the freight car... and is soon joined by Charles and Isaiah, who quietly leave the coach in silent protest and look about a half a second away from beating the stuffing out of the acidic conductor. But the one fellow who originally picked on the black man lingers behind for a while, as though he decided to stay where he was... and then emerges on the freight car with an absolutely ''glorious'' one-liner:

to:

* The episode where Charles and Isaiah took on a dangerous job transporting nitroglycerin to a blasting site. It has the [[AnAesop corollary Aesop]] of anti-discrimination; among the group of nitroglycerine haulers is a black man who is a veteran with the job that takes the place of someone who gets cold feet, and used to being the butt of many racist comments and takes it all in stride, and all to the dismay of a man who can't stand the idea of working with a Negro. All the workers hired for the job also have to ride on the freight car because they didn't have seats paid for by the ones who hired them. By the end of the episode, the person who was picking on him has realized the man is of splendid character and worthy of respect. Unfortunately, one of the conductors on the train ride back to the station throws him out of the coach because he's black. Thus, he goes back to sitting on the freight car... and is soon joined by Charles and Isaiah, who quietly leave the coach in silent protest and look about a half a second away from beating the stuffing out of the acidic conductor. But the one fellow who originally picked on the black man lingers behind for a while, as though he decided to stay where he was... and then emerges on the freight car with an absolutely ''glorious'' one-liner:
14th Jul '17 6:18:00 AM Maddoxsort
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-->Threw me out too...
-->''(takes a long pause)''
-->''(grinning from ear to ear)'' ...He found out I was '''[[FightingIrish IRISH!]]'''

to:

-->Threw -->...Threw me out out, too...
-->''(takes -->''([[{{Beat}} takes a long pause)''
pause]])''
-->''(grinning from ear to ear)'' ...ear)'' [[BaitAndSwitchComment ...He found out I was was]] '''[[FightingIrish IRISH!]]'''
14th Jul '17 6:17:05 AM Maddoxsort
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* The episode where Charles and Isaiah took on a dangerous job transporting nitroglycerin to a blasting site. It has the [[AnAesop corollary Aesop]] of a black man who is used to being the butt of many racist comments and takes it all in stride, and all the workers hired for the job have to ride on the freight car because they didn't have seats paid for by the ones who hired them. By the end of the episode, the person who was picking on him has realized the man is of splendid character and worthy of respect. Unfortunately, one of the conductors on the train ride back to the station throws him out of the coach because he's black. Thus, he goes back to sitting on the freight car... and is soon joined by Charles and Isaiah, who quietly leave the coach in silent protest and look about a half a second away from beating the stuffing out of the acidic conductor. But the one fellow who originally picked on the black man lingers behind for a while, as though he decided to stay where he was... and then emerges on the freight car with an absolutely ''glorious'' one-liner.

to:

* The episode where Charles and Isaiah took on a dangerous job transporting nitroglycerin to a blasting site. It has the [[AnAesop corollary Aesop]] of a black man who is used to being the butt of many racist comments and takes it all in stride, and all the workers hired for the job have to ride on the freight car because they didn't have seats paid for by the ones who hired them. By the end of the episode, the person who was picking on him has realized the man is of splendid character and worthy of respect. Unfortunately, one of the conductors on the train ride back to the station throws him out of the coach because he's black. Thus, he goes back to sitting on the freight car... and is soon joined by Charles and Isaiah, who quietly leave the coach in silent protest and look about a half a second away from beating the stuffing out of the acidic conductor. But the one fellow who originally picked on the black man lingers behind for a while, as though he decided to stay where he was... and then emerges on the freight car with an absolutely ''glorious'' one-liner.one-liner:
14th Jul '17 6:16:37 AM Maddoxsort
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-->''(grinning from ear to ear)'' ...He found out I was '''[[TheFightingIrish IRISH!]]'''

to:

-->''(grinning from ear to ear)'' ...He found out I was '''[[TheFightingIrish '''[[FightingIrish IRISH!]]'''
14th Jul '17 6:16:16 AM Maddoxsort
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to:

* The episode where Charles and Isaiah took on a dangerous job transporting nitroglycerin to a blasting site. It has the [[AnAesop corollary Aesop]] of a black man who is used to being the butt of many racist comments and takes it all in stride, and all the workers hired for the job have to ride on the freight car because they didn't have seats paid for by the ones who hired them. By the end of the episode, the person who was picking on him has realized the man is of splendid character and worthy of respect. Unfortunately, one of the conductors on the train ride back to the station throws him out of the coach because he's black. Thus, he goes back to sitting on the freight car... and is soon joined by Charles and Isaiah, who quietly leave the coach in silent protest and look about a half a second away from beating the stuffing out of the acidic conductor. But the one fellow who originally picked on the black man lingers behind for a while, as though he decided to stay where he was... and then emerges on the freight car with an absolutely ''glorious'' one-liner.
-->Threw me out too...
-->''(takes a long pause)''
-->''(grinning from ear to ear)'' ...He found out I was '''[[TheFightingIrish IRISH!]]'''
-->''([[EverybodyLaughsEnding Everyone bursts into unstoppable, mirthful laughter at the realization he kicked the tar out of the conductor]])''
14th Jul '17 6:05:01 AM Maddoxsort
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* Willie Olesen's transformation from mean little spoiled kid to one of Walnut Grove's finest, most responsible young men. The change happened ever so gradually, starting in Season 8 where  in the episode "Stone Soup" he helps organize an effort to help farmers during a drought; this comes as the outgrowth of seeing a pregnant Laura collapse while working to exhaustion in tending to Almonzo's orchard, and Caroline telling the story "Stone Soup" to inspire the kids. (Clearly, Willie got the message). Willie had shed his troublemaking ways after that, but his real crowning moment comes in Season 9's "Could I Have This Dance," where he [[CallingTheOldManOut calls out his overbearing mother]], Mrs. Olesen, after she tries to coddle him again (by sending him to college and making him marry a woman he has no interest in). He says he intends to oversee the restaurant/hotel named for his sister, Nellie (who had also broken off of her mother's spoiled ways a couple of seasons earlier), and plans to marry an attractive-but-poor country girl named Rachel Brown ... and stands his ground when his mother continues her attempts to intervene. When Mrs. Olesen asks Nels what had gotten into her son, he replies, "A backbone!" But even before his changeover, there were signs that Willie was not quite as bad as Nellie at her peak her own change from spoiled brat to hard-working and responsible is quite remarkable and awesome in and of itself as he often sticks up for himself and his friends (more than once, he stands his ground against Nellie) and by Season 7, he's showing signs he's grown tired of his mother's constant pampering. When Willie finally puts his foot down at his mother's abrasiveness, Harriet claims Rachel is the one responsible for his disobedience, when in reality, she's the reason he's completed his maturity into his own man.

to:

* Willie Olesen's transformation from mean little spoiled kid to one of Walnut Grove's finest, most responsible young men. The change happened ever so gradually, starting in Season 8 where  in the episode "Stone Soup" he helps organize an effort to help farmers during a drought; this comes as the outgrowth of seeing a pregnant Laura collapse while working to exhaustion in tending to Almonzo's Almanzo's orchard, and Caroline telling the story "Stone Soup" to inspire the kids. (Clearly, Willie got the message). This far into the series, Willie was nearing maturity and starting to realize how much of a fool he had been and that he needed to make a change in his life, and Laura supported him. Willie had shed his troublemaking ways after that, but his real crowning moment comes in Season 9's "Could I Have This Dance," where he [[CallingTheOldManOut calls out his overbearing mother]], Mrs. Olesen, after she tries to coddle him again (by sending him to college and making him marry a woman he has no interest in). He says he intends to oversee the restaurant/hotel named for his sister, Nellie (who had also broken off of her mother's spoiled ways a couple of seasons earlier), and plans to marry an attractive-but-poor country girl named Rachel Brown ... and stands his ground when his mother continues her attempts to intervene. When Mrs. Olesen asks Nels what had gotten into her son, he replies, "A backbone!" But even before his changeover, there were signs that Willie was not quite as bad as Nellie at her peak her own change from spoiled brat to hard-working and responsible is quite remarkable and awesome in and of itself as he often sticks up for himself and his friends (more than once, he stands his ground against Nellie) and by Season 7, he's showing signs he's grown tired of his mother's constant pampering. When Willie finally puts his foot down at his mother's abrasiveness, Harriet claims Rachel is the one responsible for his disobedience, when in reality, she's the reason he's completed his maturity into his own man.
14th Jul '17 6:02:52 AM Maddoxsort
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* "Bully Boys" has several, all because a trio of ne'er-do-well men have invaded their happy community and caused mayhem to ensue. The payback begins when Charles comes after the eldest Gallagher brothers for accosting his wife in public. As soon as he finds out that his Caroline been hurt, he ''immediately'' runs off to the Gallagher residence to defend the honor of his wife, engaging in a NoHoldsBarredBeatdown that he almost ''won'', had not the more able-bodied beefier brother jumped back in the fight. Then, the Reverend, who has been personally lied to by the Gallaghers with some nonsense about a sick ma (when their ma is every bit a deadbeat as they are and even ran off with a circus performer, leaving behind their love child as brother number three), invites them to church. You'd think this is simply because it's a kind gesture he's supposed to extend to anyone, but this time, it's to rope them into a town-wide intervention against their tyranny. At the Sunday service, Reverend Alden, normally the kindest and least aggressive of all the townspeople, changes gears from his usual gentle and virtuous sermons to a very fiery sermon about Hell directly aimed at the Gallaghers, and clarifies that Christians are not pushovers or punching bags who have to put up with evils that won't quit vexing them. It is not unjustified for Christians to fight back against injustice and fight, if the fight in question is the good fight. When one of them catches his drift and confronts him, ''the Reverend pins him up against the chapel wall''. Then, all of the men at church form a posse and march the Gallaghers out of town peacefully, while their wives, spared the dirty work, sing them off with a round of "Onward Christian Soldiers". This is just one of many times the ''entire'' town of Walnut Grove bands together to show that they will ''not'' be intimidated.

to:

* "Bully Boys" has several, all because a trio of ne'er-do-well men have invaded their happy community and caused mayhem to ensue. The payback begins when Charles comes after the eldest Gallagher Gallaender brothers for accosting his wife in public. As soon as he finds out that his Caroline been hurt, he ''immediately'' runs off to the Gallagher Gallender residence to defend the honor of his wife, engaging in a NoHoldsBarredBeatdown that he almost ''won'', had not the more able-bodied beefier brother jumped back in the fight. Then, the Reverend, who has been personally lied to by the Gallaghers Gallaenders with some nonsense about a sick ma (when their ma is every bit a deadbeat as they are and even ran off with a circus performer, leaving behind their love child as brother number three), invites them to church. You'd think this is simply because it's a kind gesture he's supposed to extend to anyone, but this time, it's to rope them into a town-wide intervention against their tyranny. At the Sunday service, Reverend Alden, normally the kindest and least aggressive of all the townspeople, changes gears from his usual gentle and virtuous sermons to a very fiery sermon about Hell directly aimed at the Gallaghers, Gallenders, and clarifies that Christians are not pushovers or punching bags who have to put up with evils that won't quit vexing them. It is not unjustified for Christians to fight back against injustice and fight, if the fight in question is the good fight. When one of them catches his drift and confronts him, ''the Reverend pins him up against the chapel wall''. Then, all of the men at church form a posse and march the Gallaghers Gallenders out of town peacefully, while their wives, spared the dirty work, sing them off with a round of "Onward Christian Soldiers". This is just one of many times the ''entire'' town of Walnut Grove bands together to show that they will ''not'' be intimidated.
30th Apr '17 11:27:29 AM Maddoxsort
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* "Bully Boys" has several, all because a trio of ne'er-do-well men have invaded their happy community and caused mayhem to ensue. The payback begins when Charles comes after the eldest Gallagher brothers for accosting his wife in public, engaging in a NoHoldsBarredBeatdown that he almost ''won'', had not the more able-bodied beefier brother jumped back in the fight. Then, the Reverend, who has been personally lied to by the Gallaghers with some nonsense about a sick ma (when their ma is every bit a deadbeat as they are and even ran off with a circus performer, leaving behind their love child as brother number three), invites them to church. You'd think this is simply because it's a kind gesture he's supposed to extend to anyone, but this time, it's to rope them into a town-wide intervention against their tyranny. At the Sunday service, Reverend Alden, normally the kindest and least aggressive of all the townspeople, changes gears from his usual gentle and virtuous sermons to a very fiery sermon about Hell directly aimed at the Gallaghers, and clarifies that Christians are not pushovers or punching bags who have to put up with evils that won't quit vexing them. It is not unjustified for Christians to fight back against injustice and fight, if the fight in question is the good fight. When one of them catches his drift and confronts him, ''the Reverend pins him up against the chapel wall''. Then, all of the men at church form a posse and march the Gallaghers out of town peacefully, while their wives, spared the dirty work, sing them off with a round of "Onward Christian Soldiers". This is just one of many times the ''entire'' town of Walnut Grove bands together to show that they will ''not'' be intimidated.

to:

* "Bully Boys" has several, all because a trio of ne'er-do-well men have invaded their happy community and caused mayhem to ensue. The payback begins when Charles comes after the eldest Gallagher brothers for accosting his wife in public, public. As soon as he finds out that his Caroline been hurt, he ''immediately'' runs off to the Gallagher residence to defend the honor of his wife, engaging in a NoHoldsBarredBeatdown that he almost ''won'', had not the more able-bodied beefier brother jumped back in the fight. Then, the Reverend, who has been personally lied to by the Gallaghers with some nonsense about a sick ma (when their ma is every bit a deadbeat as they are and even ran off with a circus performer, leaving behind their love child as brother number three), invites them to church. You'd think this is simply because it's a kind gesture he's supposed to extend to anyone, but this time, it's to rope them into a town-wide intervention against their tyranny. At the Sunday service, Reverend Alden, normally the kindest and least aggressive of all the townspeople, changes gears from his usual gentle and virtuous sermons to a very fiery sermon about Hell directly aimed at the Gallaghers, and clarifies that Christians are not pushovers or punching bags who have to put up with evils that won't quit vexing them. It is not unjustified for Christians to fight back against injustice and fight, if the fight in question is the good fight. When one of them catches his drift and confronts him, ''the Reverend pins him up against the chapel wall''. Then, all of the men at church form a posse and march the Gallaghers out of town peacefully, while their wives, spared the dirty work, sing them off with a round of "Onward Christian Soldiers". This is just one of many times the ''entire'' town of Walnut Grove bands together to show that they will ''not'' be intimidated.
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