History Awesome / JEOPARDY

3rd Jan '18 12:49:31 PM fcastriote91
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* Any time a players finds all 3 Daily Doubles and gets all of them correct.
21st Nov '17 3:08:49 PM Maddoxsort
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* October - November 2017: Quirky Austin Rodgers comes on the show and has an incredible 12-day run where he accumulates $411,000 in winnings due to having a special knack for sniffing out the Daily Doubles, making double-or-nothing bets, and huge wagers at Final Jeopardy!

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* October - November 2017: Quirky [[JokeCharacter Quirky]] Austin Rodgers Rogers comes on the show and has an [[LethalJokeCharacter incredible 12-day run where he accumulates $411,000 in winnings winnings]] due to having a special knack for sniffing out the Daily Doubles, making double-or-nothing bets, and huge wagers at Final Jeopardy!
21st Nov '17 3:08:12 PM Maddoxsort
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* October - November 2017: Quirky Austin Rodgers comes on the show and has an incredible 12-day run where he accumulates $411,000 in winnings due to having a special knack for sniffing out the Daily Doubles, making double-or-nothing bets, and huge wagers at Final Jeopardy!
* November 16 - 17, 2017: Buzzy Cohen goes from a skunker Day One in the finals where he lost all his winnings in Final Jeopardy! [[spoiler:to a commanding lead on Day Two after betting big on a Daily Double which paid off, [[DramaticIrony then everyone was stumped on that day's Final Jeopardy! in a repeat of the situations where Buzzy liked to snark Alex when he had a runaway game.]] Buzzy responded with a kind "LOVE YOU" to Trebek and wagered precious little on the final response, while Austin Rogers and Alan Lin bombed spectacularly. Buzzy went from having $0 going in to winning with ''just'' his winnings on Day Two while neither of his opponents, who had won some money Day One, could even stack up to him. Buzzy's family could be heard and seen cheering very loudly and rooting for him when he got the Daily Double right and won the $250,000 grand prize.]]
4th Nov '17 9:53:24 PM EverybodyGetUp20
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* July 27, 2007: Meryl Federman wins the one-off Teen Tournament Summer Games, after having '''$0''' going into the second final game. In that game, she turns into a buzzer demon, mounts a massive MiracleRally and ends up beating out Greg Peterson by a single buck.
25th Oct '17 6:15:35 PM asears16
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** More amazingly, in nine years of post-Jennings play, only five other people (David Madden (19 wins in 2005), Arthur Chu (11 in 2014), Julia Collins (20 in 2014), Matt Jackson (14 in 2015) and Seth Wilson (12 in 2016)) have even made it into double-digit non-Tournament victories, and until Julia Collins in mid-2014, no one else had gotten to 20 straight.

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** More amazingly, in nine years of post-Jennings play, only five six other people (David Madden (19 wins in 2005), Arthur Chu (11 in 2014), Julia Collins (20 in 2014), Matt Jackson (14 in 2015) and 2015), Seth Wilson (12 in 2016)) 2016), and Austin Rogers (12 in 2017)) have even made it into double-digit non-Tournament victories, and until Julia Collins in mid-2014, no one else had gotten to 20 straight.
19th Aug '17 2:49:49 PM mlsmithca
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* Prior to Season 20, any contestant who retired as an undefeated five-time champion.
** From Season 14-19, all undefeated champions also won a car.

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* Prior to Season 20, any contestant who retired as an undefeated five-time champion.
**
champion. From Season 14-19, all undefeated champions also won a car.



** Any time a player wins a tournament after finishing the first Final game in third place, especially if it's a distant third.

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** * Any time a player wins a tournament after finishing the first Final game in third place, especially if it's a distant third.



** November 20, 1987: Bob's victory in the '87 Tournament of Champions in a Moment of Awesome in itself for three reasons. One--Going into the second game, he was in third place. Two--He came up with the correct response in Final Jeopardy! after changing it midway. [[labelnote:Here's the Final Jeopardy! clue and Bob's response.]](The clue was "He said, 'I am the last President of the United States.'" Bob wrote down UsefulNotes/FranklinPierce, then crossed that answer out and replaced it with the correct one--UsefulNotes/JamesBuchanan.)[[/labelnote]] Third--He wagered just enough to win the tournament by ''a single dollar''!
* April 7, 1988: After placing a $6,000 wager on a Daily Double in Double Jeopardy!, Bob Beers wagers ''[[SerialEscalation $10,000]]'' on the second... '''''and gets it right'''''. This stands on record as the biggest Daily Double wager in Jeopardy! history, even adjusted to post-2001 scoring. And if he'd gotten Final Jeopardy! right, he would've set a 1-day record at $32,000.

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** * November 20, 1987: Bob's victory in the '87 Tournament of Champions in a Moment of Awesome in itself for three reasons. One--Going into the second game, he was in third place. Two--He came up with the correct response in Final Jeopardy! after changing it midway. [[labelnote:Here's the Final Jeopardy! clue and Bob's response.]](The clue was "He said, 'I am the last President of the United States.'" Bob wrote down UsefulNotes/FranklinPierce, then crossed that answer out and replaced it with the correct one--UsefulNotes/JamesBuchanan.)[[/labelnote]] Third--He wagered just enough to win the tournament by ''a single dollar''!
* April 7, 1988: After placing a $6,000 wager on a Daily Double in Double Jeopardy!, Bob Beers wagers ''[[SerialEscalation $10,000]]'' on the second... '''''and '''and gets it right'''''.right'''. This stands on record as the biggest Daily Double wager in Jeopardy! history, even adjusted to post-2001 scoring. And if he'd gotten Final Jeopardy! right, he would've set a 1-day record at $32,000.



* December 3, 1993: Frank Spangenberg finally winning a Jeopardy! tournament, claiming the $25,000 top prize in the show's 10th Anniversary Tournament by overcoming a ''$13,000'' deficit (pre-inflation, no less) against reigning TOC winner Tom Nosek after game 1 to win the event, thanks to betting everything on Final Jeopardy! in game 2, and Tom and fellow finalist Leslie Frates both missing the question.
** Not to mention, his correct response of "Who is Wendy Wasserstein?" in game 2 of the finals (for the clue: "1 of 3 women who won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in the 1980s") earned him a dinner invite from Wasserstein, as she "wanted to meet the man that remembered her name."

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* December 3, 1993: Frank Spangenberg finally winning a Jeopardy! tournament, claiming the $25,000 top prize in the show's 10th Anniversary Tournament by overcoming a ''$13,000'' deficit (pre-inflation, no less) against reigning TOC winner Tom Nosek after game 1 to win the event, thanks to betting everything on Final Jeopardy! in game 2, and Tom and fellow finalist Leslie Frates both missing the question.
** Not to mention, his
question. His correct response of "Who is Wendy Wasserstein?" in game 2 of the finals (for the clue: "1 of 3 women who won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in the 1980s") earned him a dinner invite from Wasserstein, as she "wanted to meet the man that remembered her name."



* March 16, 2007: With his two opponents tied at $8,000 and within reach, Scott Weiss figured they would risk it all. So ''he'' bet for a tie instead of the win, which led to the show's first and only [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72zn2KODSsY nonzero three-way tie]] and a very interesting intro by Johnny Gilbert on the next episode.
** And as Alex explained [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gbb7PGREMB4 in that next episode]], Scott did that because he overheard a boy asking Alex before Final Jeopardy! if a three way tie had ever happened. Alex told him no, so Scott set up the wager hoping it'd force the tie. Everybody wins!
* September 13 - 16, 2010: Season 27 began with a runaway win by Roger Craig, who also posted a total runaway in the next game — setting a new one-day record of $77,000 (beating a record set, incidentally, by Ken Jennings) in the process.
** Roger's third and fourth games were quite impressive, too. On the third, he took a $10,000 tumble on a Daily Double and finished Double Jeopardy! only $1,600 ahead of second place. Luckily, he was the only one to get Final Jeopardy! right. The fourth day, another contestant held a significant lead over him in the first half, but Roger quickly jumped back into the lead during Double Jeopardy!, including a True Daily Double.

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* March 16, 2007: With his two opponents tied at $8,000 and within reach, Scott Weiss figured they would risk it all. So ''he'' bet for a tie instead of the win, which led to the show's first and only [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72zn2KODSsY nonzero three-way tie]] and a very interesting intro by Johnny Gilbert on the next episode.
**
episode. And as Alex explained [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gbb7PGREMB4 in that next episode]], Scott did that because he overheard a boy asking Alex before Final Jeopardy! if a three way tie had ever happened. Alex told him no, so Scott set up the wager hoping it'd force the tie. Everybody wins!
* September 13 - 16, 2010: Season 27 began with a runaway win by Roger Craig, who also posted a total runaway in the next game — setting a new one-day record of $77,000 (beating a record set, incidentally, by Ken Jennings) in the process.
**
process. Roger's third and fourth games were quite impressive, too. On the third, he took a $10,000 tumble on a Daily Double and finished Double Jeopardy! only $1,600 ahead of second place. Luckily, he was the only one to get Final Jeopardy! right. The fourth day, another contestant held a significant lead over him in the first half, but Roger quickly jumped back into the lead during Double Jeopardy!, including a True Daily Double.



*** In a subversion, Rutter was reduced to being a spectator in Final Jeopardy in the 2nd game. Rutter brought a $3000 lead over Jennings from game 1, while Jennings had an $1800 lead over Rutter going into Final Jeopardy in game 2. Craig couldn't catch either of them, so the outcome of the Tournament rested entirely on whether or not Ken Jennings would answer the Final Jeopardy clue correctly. If he did, Brad Rutter's lead from the first game couldn't hold up, even if Brad doubled up in Final Jeopardy, and if he missed, Brad would win regardless of what he did. In recognition of this fact, Brad Rutter's wager during Final Jeopardy was $0.

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*** ** In a subversion, Rutter was reduced to being a spectator in Final Jeopardy in the 2nd game. Rutter brought a $3000 lead over Jennings from game 1, while Jennings had an $1800 lead over Rutter going into Final Jeopardy in game 2. Craig couldn't catch either of them, so the outcome of the Tournament rested entirely on whether or not Ken Jennings would answer the Final Jeopardy clue correctly. If he did, Brad Rutter's lead from the first game couldn't hold up, even if Brad doubled up in Final Jeopardy, and if he missed, Brad would win regardless of what he did. In recognition of this fact, Brad Rutter's wager during Final Jeopardy was $0.



* After the Battle of the Decades and Arthur Chu and Julia Collins' runs, the impressive 30th season ends in a tiebreaker at the end of the Teen Tournament, with Jeff Xie pulling off the win.
** The Tournament of Champions in the following season saw both Arthur Chu and Julia Collins make it all the way to the finals. The winner? [[spoiler:[[DarkHorseVictory Ben Ingram]], using both days' Final Jeopardy to pull an impressive upset.]]
* So far, Season 31 has had FOUR instances of a game ending in a tie between two players and both coming back the next day.
** [[FunnyAneurysmMoment Sadly,]] [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks TPTB removed the co-champion rule by November 24, 2014]].

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* After the Battle of the Decades and Arthur Chu and Julia Collins' runs, the impressive 30th season ends in a tiebreaker at the end of the Teen Tournament, with Jeff Xie pulling off the win.
**
win. The Tournament of Champions in the following season saw both Arthur Chu and Julia Collins make it all the way to the finals. The winner? [[spoiler:[[DarkHorseVictory Ben Ingram]], using both days' Final Jeopardy to pull an impressive upset.]]
* So far, Season 31 has had FOUR instances of a game ending in a tie between two players and both coming back the next day.
**
day. [[FunnyAneurysmMoment Sadly,]] [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks TPTB removed the co-champion rule by November 24, 2014]].
10th Aug '17 5:05:15 PM KoopaKid17
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* May 20, 1988: Peggy Kennedy becoming the [[YouGoGirl first female contestant to win a tournament]]—that year's Seniors Tournament.
5th Jul '17 11:50:41 PM Premonition45
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* November 14 - 15, 1991: The 1991 Tournament of Champions was notable for being the first time that ''all three'' finalists, Jim Scott, Steve Robin and Lou Pryor, were wildcard semifinalists. Jim and Steve were the two-lowest earning 5-time champions that season and Lou was the Seniors Tournament winner.

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* November 14 - 15, 1991: The 1991 Tournament of Champions was notable for being the first time that ''all three'' finalists, Jim Scott, Steve Robin and Lou Pryor, were wildcard semifinalists. Jim and Steve were the two-lowest earning 5-time champions that season and Lou was the 1991 Seniors Tournament winner.winner.
* March 5 - 6, 1992: The 1992 Teen Tournament was the first tournament [[YouGoGirl to have three female finalists]]: Cori Van Noy, April [=McManus=], and Jill Young.



* December 3rd, 1993: Frank Spangenberg finally winning a Jeopardy! tournament, claiming the $25,000 top prize in the show's 10th Anniversary Tournament by overcoming a ''$13,000'' deficit (pre-inflation, no less) against reigning TOC winner Tom Nosek after game 1 to win the event, thanks to betting everything on Final Jeopardy! in game 2, and Tom and fellow finalist Leslie Frates both missing the question.

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* December 3rd, 3, 1993: Frank Spangenberg finally winning a Jeopardy! tournament, claiming the $25,000 top prize in the show's 10th Anniversary Tournament by overcoming a ''$13,000'' deficit (pre-inflation, no less) against reigning TOC winner Tom Nosek after game 1 to win the event, thanks to betting everything on Final Jeopardy! in game 2, and Tom and fellow finalist Leslie Frates both missing the question.
3rd Jul '17 10:09:58 PM Premonition45
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* October 1 - 5, 1984: Elise Beraru becomes the Alex Trebek edition's first 5-time champion earning $47,350, setting its first 1-day record of $23,800 during her third show (October 3, 1984), which stood for nearly a year before being broken.

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* October 1 - 5, 1984: Elise Beraru becomes the Alex Trebek edition's Jeopardy's first 5-time champion earning $47,350, setting its first 1-day record of $23,800 during her third show (October 3, 1984), which stood for nearly a year before being broken.
3rd Jul '17 10:09:12 PM Premonition45
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* October 1 - 5, 1984: Elise Beraru becomes the Alex Trebek edition's first 5-time champion earning $47,350, setting its first 1-day record of $23,800 during her third show (October 3, 1984), which stood for nearly a year before being broken.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Awesome.JEOPARDY