History ArtEvolution / AnimeAndManga

7th Feb '16 2:15:42 PM nombretomado
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* While not getting into to much detail. Anime made during the [[TheTwenties 1920's]],[[TheGreatDepression 1930's]], [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation and 1940's]] look extremely different compared to modern looking anime starting in the mid 1960's.
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* While not getting into to much detail. Anime made during the [[TheTwenties 1920's]],[[TheGreatDepression 1920's]], [[TheGreatDepression 1930's]], [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation and 1940's]] look extremely different compared to modern looking anime starting in the mid 1960's.
22nd Jan '16 8:22:58 AM catmuto
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* The change in ''Manga/{{Godchild}}'' is nothing short of drastic. The series began in the 1990s, and then later in 2001 Kaori Yuki returned to it. The art in the earlier volumes is very typical shojo, and does not stand out. Later on, however, the art is exceptionally detailed and the people are rendered much more realistically. [[http://media.photobucket.com/image/godchild%20cain/Vampire_Nymous/Godchild/cain001.jpg?o=90/ Here]] is an example from the beginning of the series and [[http://media.photobucket.com/image/godchild%20cain/EizzyVirus5/largeAnimePaperscans_Count-Cain_Fuu.jpg?o=145/ here's]] an example from the latter part of the series.

* While somewhat subtle, ''Manga/AzumangaDaioh'' saw this happen. In the beginning of the series, Chiyo-chan's pigtails are shaggy, Mr. Kimura's mouth is closed, Mr. Tadakichi looks more realistic and Osaka has eyelashes and a more feminine cast to her face. It takes a while for the characters to develop what one would consider their signature appearances. Notably, the evolution continues, and near the end Chiyo-chan's eyes have a... [['Manga/{{Yotsuba}}'' distinctive]] look.
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* While somewhat subtle, ''Manga/AzumangaDaioh'' saw this happen. In the beginning of the series, Chiyo-chan's pigtails are shaggy, Mr. Kimura's mouth is closed, Mr. Tadakichi looks more realistic and Osaka has eyelashes and a more feminine cast to her face. It takes a while for the characters to develop what one would consider their signature appearances. Notably, the evolution continues, and near the end Chiyo-chan's eyes have a... [['Manga/{{Yotsuba}}'' [[Manga/{{Yotsuba}} distinctive]] look.

* TheNineties anime of ''Anime/SailorMoon'' is noticably different between the first and 5th seasons. Just try watching the first season after finishing the 5th. It isn't simply better animation, the characters look noticably different (to be fair they're supposed to have aged 3 years). Usagi herself has become rather sexy by the end.
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* TheNineties anime of ''Anime/SailorMoon'' is noticably different between the first and 5th seasons. Just try watching the first season after finishing the 5th. It isn't simply better animation, the characters look noticably different (to be fair they're supposed to have aged 3 2 years). Usagi herself has become rather sexy by the end.

* The early art in [[Creator/ShinichiSakamoto Shinichi Sakamoto's]] Manga/KokounoHito showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent, where the art became even more complex and detailed.
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* The early art in [[Creator/ShinichiSakamoto Shinichi Sakamoto's]] Manga/KokounoHito ''Manga/KokounoHito'' showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent, where the art became even more complex and detailed.
2nd Jan '16 6:03:06 PM wehrmacht
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* The early art in Creator/ShinichiSakamoto Manga/KokounoHito showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent, where the art became even more complex and detailed.
to:
* The early art in Creator/ShinichiSakamoto [[Creator/ShinichiSakamoto Shinichi Sakamoto's]] Manga/KokounoHito showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent, where the art became even more complex and detailed.
2nd Jan '16 6:02:06 PM wehrmacht
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* The early art in Shinichi Sakamoto's Manga/KokounoHito showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent, where the art became even more complex and detailed.
to:
* The early art in Shinichi Sakamoto's Creator/ShinichiSakamoto Manga/KokounoHito showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent, where the art became even more complex and detailed.
2nd Jan '16 6:01:40 PM wehrmacht
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* The early art in Shinichi Sakamoto's Manga/KokounoHito showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent.
to:
* The early art in Shinichi Sakamoto's Manga/KokounoHito showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent.Innocent, where the art became even more complex and detailed.
31st Dec '15 8:34:14 PM wehrmacht
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* ''Manga/{{Jiraishin}}'' was Tsutomu Takahashi's first foray into manga. In the beginning the art is competently done but somewhat generic. Near the middle of the series one begins to notice Takakashi's growing expertise; the characters begin getting much more stylized and distinctive, and the inking starts to take a life of its own (with an emphasis on deep blacks and thin lines), giving Takahashi his signature "sketchy" look, which was continuously refined in his more recent works like Jiraishin Diablo, Sidooh, Skyhigh, and Hito Hitori Futari. This distinct aesthetic would be passed down to his assistant Tsutomu Nihei and Nihei's own assistant Hayashida Q (creator of ''Manga/{{Dorohedoro}}'').
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* ''Manga/{{Jiraishin}}'' was Tsutomu Takahashi's Creator/TsutomuTakahashi first foray into manga. In the beginning the art is competently done but somewhat generic. Near the middle of the series one begins to notice Takakashi's growing expertise; the characters begin getting much more stylized and distinctive, and the inking starts to take a life of its own (with an emphasis on deep blacks and thin lines), giving Takahashi his signature "sketchy" look, which was continuously refined in his more recent works like Jiraishin Diablo, Sidooh, Skyhigh, and Hito Hitori Futari. This distinct aesthetic would be passed down to his assistant Tsutomu Nihei and Nihei's own assistant Hayashida Q (creator of ''Manga/{{Dorohedoro}}'').
31st Dec '15 2:53:55 PM Doug86
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* Unusual anime example with ''VisualNovel/LittleBusters'': the animation of the first season was pretty regular, with occasional {{Animation Bump}}s for big episodes. (Though not the first episode, strangely.) Naturally, the people who were angry Little Busters was being animated by Creator/JCStaff and not the illustrious KyotoAnimation were not happy. And then the second season, half the length of the first, came around, and just the first three episodes alone showed much, ''much'' better animation than anything from the first season. It's as though they got the same animation budget for both seasons and used the excess damn well the second time around.
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* Unusual anime example with ''VisualNovel/LittleBusters'': the animation of the first season was pretty regular, with occasional {{Animation Bump}}s for big episodes. (Though not the first episode, strangely.) Naturally, the people who were angry Little Busters was being animated by Creator/JCStaff and not the illustrious KyotoAnimation Creator/KyotoAnimation were not happy. And then the second season, half the length of the first, came around, and just the first three episodes alone showed much, ''much'' better animation than anything from the first season. It's as though they got the same animation budget for both seasons and used the excess damn well the second time around.
30th Dec '15 6:59:36 PM wehrmacht
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* ''Manga/SlamDunk'' went through extreme jumps in quality for a manga that only lasted 6 years (relatively short by Shonen Jump standards). The style of the early chapters was generic and dated; thick lines, too much shading, and pompadours everywhere made it look like any late 80s and early 90s shonen manga. By the end of the manga, Inoue has his trademark realistic style, making Slam Dunk distinct from other mangas by the mid-90s. His art would evolve even further in Manga/Vagabond, where Inoue would not only make his art even more realistic, but also take up inking with a brush as opposed to a pen later in the manga, turning the manga into a beautiful example of calligraphy.
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* ''Manga/SlamDunk'' went through extreme jumps in quality for a manga that only lasted 6 years (relatively short by Shonen Jump standards). The style of the early chapters was generic and dated; thick lines, too much shading, and pompadours everywhere made it look like any late 80s and early 90s shonen manga. By the end of the manga, Inoue has his trademark realistic style, making Slam Dunk distinct from other mangas by the mid-90s. His art would evolve even further in Manga/Vagabond, {{Manga/Vagabond}}, where Inoue would not only make his art even more realistic, but also take up inking with a brush as opposed to a pen later in the manga, turning the manga into a beautiful example of calligraphy.
29th Dec '15 10:19:22 PM wehrmacht
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* ''Manga/SlamDunk'' went through extreme jumps in quality for a manga that only lasted 6 years (relatively short by Shonen Jump standards). The style of the early chapters was generic and dated; thick lines, too much shading, and pompadours everywhere made it look like any late 80s and early 90s shonen manga. By the end of the manga, Inoue has his trademark realistic style, making Slam Dunk distinct from other mangas by the mid-90s.
to:
* ''Manga/SlamDunk'' went through extreme jumps in quality for a manga that only lasted 6 years (relatively short by Shonen Jump standards). The style of the early chapters was generic and dated; thick lines, too much shading, and pompadours everywhere made it look like any late 80s and early 90s shonen manga. By the end of the manga, Inoue has his trademark realistic style, making Slam Dunk distinct from other mangas by the mid-90s. His art would evolve even further in Manga/Vagabond, where Inoue would not only make his art even more realistic, but also take up inking with a brush as opposed to a pen later in the manga, turning the manga into a beautiful example of calligraphy.
24th Dec '15 10:52:01 PM wehrmacht
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* The early art in Shinichi Sakamoto's Kokou no Hito showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent.
to:
* The early art in Shinichi Sakamoto's Kokou no Hito Manga/KokounoHito showed promise but was a bit rough; characters were often drawn as if they had parts of their skulls missing and the proportions were often wonky in general. As the series went on the art became much more detailed, polished, and realistic, which would set the standard for Sakamoto's next series, Innocent.
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