History Anime / CastleInTheSky

7th Dec '17 6:01:50 PM dsneybuf
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The dub, originally recorded in 1998, was initially scheduled for a 1999 video release, but continually delayed for unexplained reasons (though the re-scoring and a sudden shift from direct-to-video to theatrical release that never happened are the most commonly cited). It was screened at select children's festivals before finally debuting on VHS and DVD in April 2003, alongside ''Anime/SpiritedAway'' and ''Anime/KikisDeliveryService'', gradually garnering new fans. This dub is one of only two Ghibli films (the other being ''Kiki's Delivery Service'') which Disney "Americanized"; future Ghibli releases only featured new voicework instead of the extensive musical reworking that ''Castle in the Sky'' and ''Kiki's Delivery Service'' underwent. A 2010 re-release of the film replaced the re-scored soundtrack with the original and also removed some of the additional chatter added to the dub (again to fill-in some of the more silent moments). Inexplicably, though, the faithful subtitle track on the 2003 DVD release was mysteriously replaced with a {{dubtitle}}. Even more strangely, the Japanese, Australian, and UK Blu Rays ''contain'' the extended score on the English track sans the extra dialogue and rerecorded sound effects from the 2003 release but the American BD release does not. This has been rectified when [=GKids=] reissued the movie on BD in 2017, providing fans with the choice to see the Disney dub with either score (minus extra dialogue and redone sound effects) -- as well as a literal subtitle track for fans of the Japanese version.

to:

The dub, originally recorded in 1998, was initially scheduled for a 1999 video release, but continually delayed for unexplained reasons (though the re-scoring and a sudden shift from direct-to-video to theatrical release that never happened are the most commonly cited). It was screened at select children's festivals before finally debuting on VHS and DVD in April 2003, alongside ''Anime/SpiritedAway'' and ''Anime/KikisDeliveryService'', gradually garnering new fans. This dub is one of only two Ghibli films (the other being ''Kiki's Delivery Service'') which Disney "Americanized"; future Ghibli releases only featured new voicework instead of the extensive musical reworking that ''Castle in the Sky'' and ''Kiki's Delivery Service'' underwent. A 2010 re-release of the film replaced the re-scored soundtrack with the original and also removed some of the additional chatter added to the dub (again to fill-in some of the more silent moments). Inexplicably, though, the faithful subtitle track on the 2003 DVD release was mysteriously replaced with a {{dubtitle}}. Even more strangely, the Japanese, Australian, and UK Blu Rays ''contain'' the extended score on the English track sans the extra dialogue and rerecorded sound effects from the 2003 release but the American BD release does not. This has been rectified when [=GKids=] reissued the movie on BD and DVD in 2017, providing fans with the choice to see the Disney dub with either score (minus extra dialogue and redone sound effects) -- as well as a literal subtitle track for fans of the Japanese version.
29th Nov '17 9:03:46 PM dsneybuf
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The dub, originally recorded in 1998, was initially scheduled for a 1999 video release, but continually delayed for unexplained reasons (though the re-scoring and a sudden shift from direct-to-video to theatrical release that never happened are the most commonly cited). It was screened at select children's festivals before finally debuting on VHS and DVD in April 2003, alongside ''Anime/SpiritedAway'' and ''Anime/KikisDeliveryService'', gradually garnering new fans. This dub is one of only two Ghibli films (the other being ''Kiki's Delivery Service'') which Disney "Americanized"; future Ghibli releases only featured new voicework instead of the extensive musical reworking that ''Castle in the Sky'' and ''Kiki's Delivery Service'' underwent. A 2010 re-release of the film replaced the re-scored soundtrack with the original and also removed some of the additional chatter added to the dub (again to fill-in some of the more silent moments). Inexplicably, though, the faithful subtitle track on the 2003 DVD release was mysteriously replaced with a {{dubtitle}}. Even more strangely, the Japanese, Australian, and UK Blu Rays ''contain'' the extended score on the English track sans the extra dialogue and rerecorded sound effects from the 2003 release but the American BD release does not. Recently, however, this has been rectified when GKids reissued the movie on BD in 2017, providing fans with the choice to see the Disney dub with either score (minus extra dialogue and redone sound effects) -- as well as a literal subtitle track for fans of the Japanese version.

to:

The dub, originally recorded in 1998, was initially scheduled for a 1999 video release, but continually delayed for unexplained reasons (though the re-scoring and a sudden shift from direct-to-video to theatrical release that never happened are the most commonly cited). It was screened at select children's festivals before finally debuting on VHS and DVD in April 2003, alongside ''Anime/SpiritedAway'' and ''Anime/KikisDeliveryService'', gradually garnering new fans. This dub is one of only two Ghibli films (the other being ''Kiki's Delivery Service'') which Disney "Americanized"; future Ghibli releases only featured new voicework instead of the extensive musical reworking that ''Castle in the Sky'' and ''Kiki's Delivery Service'' underwent. A 2010 re-release of the film replaced the re-scored soundtrack with the original and also removed some of the additional chatter added to the dub (again to fill-in some of the more silent moments). Inexplicably, though, the faithful subtitle track on the 2003 DVD release was mysteriously replaced with a {{dubtitle}}. Even more strangely, the Japanese, Australian, and UK Blu Rays ''contain'' the extended score on the English track sans the extra dialogue and rerecorded sound effects from the 2003 release but the American BD release does not. Recently, however, this This has been rectified when GKids [=GKids=] reissued the movie on BD in 2017, providing fans with the choice to see the Disney dub with either score (minus extra dialogue and redone sound effects) -- as well as a literal subtitle track for fans of the Japanese version.
30th Oct '17 9:23:56 PM JTurner
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The dub, originally recorded in 1998, was initially scheduled for a 1999 video release, but continually delayed for unexplained reasons (though the re-scoring and a sudden shift from direct-to-video to theatrical release that never happened are the most commonly cited). It was screened at select children's festivals before finally debuting on VHS and DVD in April 2003, alongside ''Anime/SpiritedAway'' and ''Anime/KikisDeliveryService'', gradually garnering new fans. This dub is one of only two Ghibli films (the other being ''Kiki's Delivery Service'') which Disney "Americanized"; future Ghibli releases only featured new voicework instead of the extensive musical reworking that ''Castle in the Sky'' and ''Kiki's Delivery Service'' underwent. A 2010 re-release of the film replaced the re-scored soundtrack with the original and also removed some of the additional chatter added to the dub (again to fill-in some of the more silent moments). Inexplicably, though, the faithful subtitle track on the 2003 DVD release was mysteriously replaced with a {{dubtitle}}. (Even more strangely, the Japanese, Australian, and UK Blu Rays ''contain'' the extended score on the English track sans the extra dialogue and rerecorded sound effects from the 2003 release but the American BD release does not.)

to:

The dub, originally recorded in 1998, was initially scheduled for a 1999 video release, but continually delayed for unexplained reasons (though the re-scoring and a sudden shift from direct-to-video to theatrical release that never happened are the most commonly cited). It was screened at select children's festivals before finally debuting on VHS and DVD in April 2003, alongside ''Anime/SpiritedAway'' and ''Anime/KikisDeliveryService'', gradually garnering new fans. This dub is one of only two Ghibli films (the other being ''Kiki's Delivery Service'') which Disney "Americanized"; future Ghibli releases only featured new voicework instead of the extensive musical reworking that ''Castle in the Sky'' and ''Kiki's Delivery Service'' underwent. A 2010 re-release of the film replaced the re-scored soundtrack with the original and also removed some of the additional chatter added to the dub (again to fill-in some of the more silent moments). Inexplicably, though, the faithful subtitle track on the 2003 DVD release was mysteriously replaced with a {{dubtitle}}. (Even Even more strangely, the Japanese, Australian, and UK Blu Rays ''contain'' the extended score on the English track sans the extra dialogue and rerecorded sound effects from the 2003 release but the American BD release does not.)
not. Recently, however, this has been rectified when GKids reissued the movie on BD in 2017, providing fans with the choice to see the Disney dub with either score (minus extra dialogue and redone sound effects) -- as well as a literal subtitle track for fans of the Japanese version.
14th Oct '17 10:35:19 AM SymBionicFan
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Added DiffLines:

* NiceJobFixingItVillain: Dola's speech to Pazu about him choosing to forget about Laputa and leaving Sheeta behind is enough to snap him out of his HeroicBSOD.
9th Oct '17 12:05:06 PM ChaoticNovelist
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* AmuletOfConcentratedAwesome: Sheeta's necklace.

to:

* AmuletOfConcentratedAwesome: Sheeta's necklace.necklace's is made of Aetherium. This means it has anti-gravity effects and is needed for spells involving Laputa.



* AuthorAppeal: Loads of flying scenes, fantastical aircraft, and precipitous heights.

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* AuthorAppeal: Loads of flying scenes, fantastical aircraft, and precipitous heights.heights; all typical of Creator/HayaoMiyazaki.



* ByTheHair: Muska does this to Sheeta when he takes her hostage.

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* ByTheHair: Muska does this to Sheeta when he takes her hostage.hostage so as to better control her.



* ChildrenAreInnocent: Pazu and Sheeta are the main protagonists of the movie and are treated as being pure-hearted if a little naive.
* CloseCallHaircut: Happens to Sheeta in the climax, when Muska shoots off both her pigtails as a threat, telling her that her ears are next. Lampshaded by Dola when they reunite.

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* ChildrenAreInnocent: Pazu and Sheeta are the main protagonists of the movie and are treated as being pure-hearted if a little naive.
* CloseCallHaircut: Happens to Sheeta in the climax, when Muska shoots off both her pigtails as a threat, telling her that her ears are next. Lampshaded It's lampshaded by Dola when they reunite.reunite (she also wears her hair in pigtails).



* CollapsingLair: Laputa collapses due to the spell of destruction.

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* CollapsingLair: [[spoiler: Laputa collapses due to the spell of destruction.destruction]].



* ConvenientlyAnOrphan: Both the children. Pazu's mother isn't mentioned and his father is implied to have taken his own life when he was called a liar about Laputa. Sheeta's parents were said to have died in her backstory.

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* ConvenientlyAnOrphan: Both the children. Pazu's mother isn't mentioned and his father is implied to have taken his own life when he was called a liar about Laputa. Sheeta's parents were said to have died in her backstory. Thus there is no one to help the latter in the beginning, and no one to stop the former from going after her.



* DisneyVillainDeath: Muska [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness disposes of the general and his men]] by dropping them from Laputa into the ocean [[spoiler: [[KarmicDeath which is how Muska himself dies]] after the city is destroyed]].

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* DisneyVillainDeath: Muska [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness disposes of the general and his men]] by dropping them from Laputa into the ocean ocean, [[spoiler: [[KarmicDeath which is how Muska himself dies]] after the city is destroyed]].



* EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas: Though Dola and her boys [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold aren't all THAT bad]].

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* EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas: Though Dola and her boys [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold aren't all THAT bad]].bad]], they are still pirates and it is clear that they have a lot of respect for their mom.



* EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses: [[spoiler:Sheeta turns out to be one.]]
** BadassPrincess: [[spoiler:Taking into account her EstablishingCharacterMoment, and later willingness to pitch into battles [[ImprovisedWeapon however she can]].]]

to:

* EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses: [[spoiler:Sheeta turns out to be one.]]
** BadassPrincess: [[spoiler:Taking into account her EstablishingCharacterMoment, and later willingness to pitch into battles [[ImprovisedWeapon however
a princess, technically, since she can]].descends from Laputa's royal family. However, it is in-name only.]]



* EvilLaugh: Muska, when he takes control of Laputa's power and uses it to dispose of the General and his army (and their almighty battleship).
** Although the performance is pretty subdued overall, at this point Creator/MarkHamill is clearly channeling [[ComicBook/TheJoker someone else]].

to:

* EvilLaugh: Muska, when he takes control of Laputa's power and uses it to dispose of the General and his army (and their almighty battleship).
**
battleship). Although the performance is pretty subdued overall, at this point Creator/MarkHamill is clearly channeling [[ComicBook/TheJoker someone else]].



* GhibliHills: Naturally. Although it's worth noting that the landscape looks like it's slowly recovering from something terrible. Pazu's hometown is a mining village, surrounded by deep chasms riddled with tunnels and endless wooden scaffolding, and the green grass on the surface is punched full of craters. Another Ghibli film that references an apocalyptic past -- particularly obvious when one considers the parallels between [[spoiler: the [[KillSat superweapon]] in the heart of the Castle and nuclear weaponry]].
* GirlishPigtails: Sheeta, until her ImportantHaircut. Dola also wears her hair like this.

to:

* GhibliHills: Naturally. Although it's worth noting that the landscape looks like it's slowly recovering from something terrible. Pazu's hometown is a mining village, surrounded by deep chasms riddled with tunnels and endless wooden scaffolding, and the green grass on the surface is punched full of craters. Another It is another Ghibli film that references an apocalyptic past -- particularly obvious when one considers the parallels between [[spoiler: the [[KillSat superweapon]] in the heart of the Castle and nuclear weaponry]].
* GirlishPigtails: Sheeta, until her ImportantHaircut. Sheeta and Dola also wears her both style their hair like this.this way. It is a point of bonding.



* TheGuardsMustBeCrazy: At Laputa, when the pirates are overpowered and bound, the soldiers forget to search Dola. She loans Pazu a ''grenade launcher'' she had hidden in her puffy pants.
** Subverted in the initial scene: the guards are fending off the Dola Gang, and even then they leave Muska (a full-grown man) in charge of watching the girl. (Yet Muska later lays the blame for Sheeta's escape on the military, without a trace of shame.)

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* TheGuardsMustBeCrazy: At Laputa, when the pirates are overpowered and bound, the soldiers forget to search Dola. She loans Pazu a ''grenade launcher'' she had hidden in her puffy pants.
TheGuardsMustBeCrazy:
** Subverted in the initial scene: scene. There the guards are fending off the Dola Gang, and even then they leave Muska (a full-grown man) in charge of watching the girl. (Yet Muska later lays the blame for Sheeta's escape on the military, without a trace of shame.))
** At Laputa, when the pirates are overpowered and bound, the soldiers forget to search Dola. She loans Pazu a ''grenade launcher'' she had hidden in her puffy pants.



* HoldingHands: Pazu and Sheeta do this often.
* IfMyCalculationsAreCorrect: Dola, when discussing with Sheeta the distance to Laputa.
** [[spoiler: Ultimately subverted. The weather shifts, making Dola's calculations incorrect.]]
* ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy: Almost to the point of GunsAreWorthless. Apparently, the best a trained army can do against an unarmed boy is slightly graze his cheek.
* ImprobableAimingSkills: Muska, however, seems much better with a gun - he manages to shoot [[spoiler:off both of Sheeta's pigtails mid-range]].

to:

* HoldingHands: Pazu and Sheeta do this often.
often, either for emotional support or so they're less likely to be separated.
* IfMyCalculationsAreCorrect: Dola, when discussing with Sheeta the distance to Laputa.
**
Laputa. It is [[spoiler: Ultimately ultimately subverted. The weather shifts, making Dola's calculations incorrect.]]
* ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy: Almost to the point of GunsAreWorthless. Apparently, the best a trained army can do against an unarmed boy is slightly graze his cheek.
* ImprobableAimingSkills: Muska, however, seems much better with Muska is a gun - he great shot. He manages to shoot [[spoiler:off both of Sheeta's pigtails mid-range]].



* JabbaTableManners: Dola and the pirates. See BigEater.

to:

* JabbaTableManners: Dola and the pirates. See BigEater.They are ''pirates'', after all. They don't have much use for polite eating.



* LargeHam: In Disney's dub, some of the pirates or incidental characters may qualify (not that it's a bad thing), but most definitely Cloris Leachman's performance as Dola in general (to good effect, as she arguably makes the character the most memorable in the whole movie); likewise, when Muska goes crazy at the end, Mark Hamill really gets to have fun, laughing maniacally and spouting a very memorable "Goodbye! Enjoy the ride!" prior to sending the soldiers to their deaths. There are even places where he sounds like ComicBook/TheJoker.

to:

* LargeHam: LargeHam:
**
In Disney's dub, some of the pirates or incidental characters may qualify (not that it's a bad thing), but most definitely Cloris Leachman's performance as Dola in general (to good effect, as she arguably makes the character the most memorable in the whole movie); likewise, when Muska goes crazy at the end, Mark Hamill really gets to have fun, laughing maniacally and spouting a very memorable "Goodbye! Enjoy the ride!" prior to sending the soldiers to their deaths. There are even places where he sounds like ComicBook/TheJoker.



** The General in the Japanese version definitely fits this trope. Ichiro Nagai was practically the go to guy for hammy villains in his day.

to:

** The General in the Japanese version definitely fits this trope. Ichiro Nagai was practically the go to go-to guy for hammy villains in his day.



* ManChild: All of Dola's sons act more like boys. Blame it on their ApronMatron.
* MarshmallowHell: Done by Dola to Sheeta. Played for laughs, see VictoriasSecretCompartment below.

to:

* ManChild: All of Dola's adult sons act more like boys. Blame it on their ApronMatron.
* MarshmallowHell: Done by Dola to Sheeta.Sheeta through overt concern and enthusiasm. Played for laughs, see VictoriasSecretCompartment below.



* TheMenInBlack: Those two henchmen of Muska's.

to:

* TheMenInBlack: Those two henchmen of Muska's.Muska's dress in the style and are indeed mysterious.



* NotEvilJustMisunderstood: Dola and her boys are typical Miyazaki heavies who eventually get won over to the good side. And of course they weren't really evil, just goofy pirates. Averted with Muska, however. He is actually the most unusual villain for a Miyazaki movie as he is totally malevolent with no redeeming qualities whatsoever. The only other Miyazaki villain that even comes close is the very similar Count Cagliostro from ''Anime/TheCastleOfCagliostro''. But that was really more Miyazaki playing around in someone else's universe.

to:

* NotEvilJustMisunderstood: Dola and her boys are typical Miyazaki heavies who eventually get won over to the good side. And of course they They weren't really evil, just goofy pirates. This is Averted with Muska, however.Muska. He is actually the most unusual villain for a Miyazaki movie as he is totally malevolent with no redeeming qualities whatsoever. The only other Miyazaki villain that even comes close is the very similar Count Cagliostro from ''Anime/TheCastleOfCagliostro''. But ''Anime/TheCastleOfCagliostro'', but that was really more Miyazaki playing around in someone else's universe.



* OminousFloatingCastle: Laputa.

to:

* OminousFloatingCastle: Laputa.Laputa's ruins, the robots, and the superweapon inside all make it mysterious and dangerous place aside from the fact that, of course, it is a ''flying'' castle.



* OpaqueNerdGlasses: Papa.
* OrphansPlotTrinket: Sheeta's pendant.
* OutOfTheInferno: The Laputian robot when escaping the castle.

to:

* OpaqueNerdGlasses: Papa.
* OrphansPlotTrinket: Sheeta's pendant.
Papa is the only one of his family to wear glasses and he is an engineer. His eyes can't be seen but this doesn't make him sinister.
* OrphansPlotTrinket: Sheeta's pendant is a momento from her deceased parents.
* OutOfTheInferno: The Laputian robot when escaping the castle.castle through fire; it is driven by [[spoiler: a desire to protect its creator's princess.]]



* PinkMeansFeminine: Dola, the only female pirate, has pink hair.

to:

* PinkMeansFeminine: PinkMeansFeminine:
**
Dola, the only female pirate, has pink hair.



* PlatonicBoyGirlHeroes: Pazu and Sheeta, naturally.
* PluckyGirl: Sheeta. Being a Miyazaki heroine, this is a given.

to:

* %%%%%% Why does it matter
%%%*
PlatonicBoyGirlHeroes: Pazu and Sheeta, naturally.
Sheeta.
* PluckyGirl: Sheeta. Being a Miyazaki heroine, this is a given.she has plenty of determination and optimism.



* ProtagonistCenteredMorality: When the army begins looting Laputa, Pazu reacts with disgust, calling them thieves. Dola and the gang receive no such reprimand when it's revealed they snagged some golden goodies for themselves before Laputa floated away. The two are different degrees of theft committed by people held to two different standards, but it's still a bit odd.
** In fairness sake, the army was shown ripping apart a good chunk of Laputa in their rush to get the gold. While the army is destroying priceless gold forged artwork while ripping it off the walls what Dola and her gang have appears to be mostly jewelry and loose gems or gold coins - gold they'll need to get a new ship.

to:

* ProtagonistCenteredMorality: When the army begins looting Laputa, Pazu reacts with disgust, calling them thieves. Dola and the gang receive no such reprimand when it's revealed they snagged some golden goodies for themselves before Laputa floated away. [[SubvertedTrope There is an important distinction here]]. The two are different degrees of theft committed by people held to two different standards, but it's still a bit odd.
** In fairness sake, the
army was shown ripping apart a good chunk of Laputa in their rush to get the gold. While the army is destroying priceless gold forged artwork while ripping it off the walls walls, what Dola and her gang have appears to be mostly jewelry and loose gems or gold coins - gold they'll need to get a new ship.



* RoyalBlood: [[spoiler: Sheeta and Muska are both descendants of the Laputian royal family.]]
* ScaryShinyGlasses: Colonel Muska's glasses do this on at least one occasion.
* SceneryPorn: Another Ghibli staple; it seems like every time you blink, there's another establishing shot or sweeping pan.

to:

* RoyalBlood: [[spoiler: Sheeta and Muska are both descendants of the Laputian royal family.]]
This is necessary for using Laputa's powers]]
* ScaryShinyGlasses: Colonel Muska's glasses do this on at least one occasion.
occasion. He's a villain, after all.
* SceneryPorn: Another Ghibli staple; it seems like every time you blink, there's another establishing shot or sweeping pan.pan of the landscape, the clouds with the sun or Laputa itself.



* ShoutOut: The fox-squirrel critters from ''Manga/NausicaaOfTheValleyOfTheWind'' make an appearance in Laputa. The odd headless beaver-tailed creatures and the longhaired yaks are from ''Nausicaa'' as well, and the robots strongly resemble the Heedra. The latter three only appear in the manga.

to:

* ShoutOut: ShoutOut:
**
The fox-squirrel critters from ''Manga/NausicaaOfTheValleyOfTheWind'' make an appearance in Laputa. The odd headless beaver-tailed creatures and the longhaired yaks are from ''Nausicaa'' as well, and the robots strongly resemble the Heedra. The latter three only appear in the manga.



* SkyPirate: Dola and her crew.
* TheSocialDarwinist: Muska, as he reveals in a MotiveRant.
* SolarPunk: The city of Laputa features hanging gardens and overgrowth that's reminiscent of the urban farming movement of today.

to:

* SkyPirate: Dola and her crew.
crew soar through the skies to find treasure.
* TheSocialDarwinist: Muska, as he reveals in a MotiveRant.
MotiveRant, believes that he is a superior breed of humanity and must use Laputa's power to guide the stupid commoners.
* SolarPunk: The city of Laputa features hanging gardens and overgrowth that's reminiscent of the urban farming movement of today.the 21st century.



* SteamPunk: Mixed with a little Feudal Punk.

to:

* %%* SteamPunk: Mixed with a little Feudal Punk.



* SurpriseCheckmate: When Dola is playing chess in her room.

to:

* %%* SurpriseCheckmate: When Dola is playing chess in her room.



* ThoseMagnificentFlyingMachines: Might as well be considered flying machine porn.

to:

* ThoseMagnificentFlyingMachines: Might as well be considered flying machine porn.porn considering how many there are and how they're all after a castle that flies high in the sky.



* VictoriasSecretCompartment: Dola somehow manages to fill her cleavage with jewels even as they barely escape with their lives.
** Then there's the grenade launcher plus reloads she keeps hidden in her stuffed trousers.
* WaveMotionGun: The Laputian robot's "eyes" are the muzzles of ''two'' of them: A slashing laser and a Destructo-Beam.
** It's worth noting that the lasers used by the robots follow a realistic theory about the capability of laser weapons: They don't have a maximum range and they travel near-instantly. This is most clearly demonstrated when [[spoiler:Sheeta throws off the damaged Fortress robot's aim and the beam shoots off across the countryside for ''miles'' before it can cut the beam to avoid risking harm to Sheeta]].

to:

* VictoriasSecretCompartment: Dola somehow manages to fill her cleavage with jewels even as they barely escape with their lives.
**
lives. Then there's the grenade launcher plus reloads she keeps hidden in her stuffed trousers.
* WaveMotionGun: WaveMotionGun:
**
The Laputian robot's "eyes" are the muzzles of ''two'' of them: A slashing laser and a Destructo-Beam.
**
Destructo-Beam. It's worth noting that the lasers used by the robots follow a realistic theory about the capability of laser weapons: They don't have a maximum range and they travel near-instantly. This is most clearly demonstrated when [[spoiler:Sheeta throws off the damaged Fortress robot's aim and the beam shoots off across the countryside for ''miles'' before it can cut the beam to avoid risking harm to Sheeta]].
9th Sep '17 11:10:45 AM Cupcakes
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** In fairness sake, the army was shown destroying a good chunk of Laputa in their rush to get the gold. What Dola and her gang have appears to be stuff they snitched from what the army took - gold they'll need to get a new ship.

to:

** In fairness sake, the army was shown destroying ripping apart a good chunk of Laputa in their rush to get the gold. What While the army is destroying priceless gold forged artwork while ripping it off the walls what Dola and her gang have appears to be stuff they snitched from what the army took mostly jewelry and loose gems or gold coins - gold they'll need to get a new ship.
2nd Sep '17 9:10:10 PM Zeiss
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** The robots with guns as their "faces" are reminiscent of robots in ''Gulliver's Travels Beyond the Moon'', a 1965 animated feature film on which Hayao Miyazaki had one of his first jobs.

to:

** The robots with guns as their "faces" are reminiscent of robots in ''Gulliver's Travels Beyond the Moon'', a 1965 animated feature film on which Hayao Miyazaki had one of his first jobs. More significantly, ''Castle'' and the 1965 film both took inspiration from Jonathan Swift's ''Literature/GulliversTravels''.
28th Aug '17 10:59:59 PM Qaweldon
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Added DiffLines:

* FreezeFrameBonus: Near the end of the movie when Laputa [[spoiler: starts to fall apart]], if you pause at the right time you will actually see [[spoiler: Muska in the debris falling to his death]].
24th Aug '17 7:45:45 AM Zeiss
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** The robots with guns as their "faces" might be a reference to the robots in ''Gulliver's Travels Beyond the Moon'', a 1965 animated feature film on which Hayao Miyazaki had one of his first jobs.

to:

** The robots with guns as their "faces" might be a reference to the are reminiscent of robots in ''Gulliver's Travels Beyond the Moon'', a 1965 animated feature film on which Hayao Miyazaki had one of his first jobs.
17th Jul '17 4:30:28 PM fruitstripegum
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* SolarPunk: The city of Laputa features hanging gardens and overgrowth that's reminiscent of the urban farming movement of today.



* SolarPunk: The city of Laputa features hanging gardens and overgrowth that's reminiscent of the urban farming movement of today.
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