History Anime / CastleInTheSky

18th Feb '17 2:59:00 AM Silverblade2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Although the performance is pretty subdued overall, at this point Creator/MarkHamill is clearly channeling [[SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker someone else]].

to:

** Although the performance is pretty subdued overall, at this point Creator/MarkHamill is clearly channeling [[SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker [[ComicBook/TheJoker someone else]].



* LargeHam: In Disney's dub, some of the pirates or incidental characters may qualify (not that it's a bad thing), but most definitely Cloris Leachman's performance as Dola in general (to good effect, as she arguably makes the character the most memorable in the whole movie); likewise, when Muska goes crazy at the end, Mark Hamill really gets to have fun, laughing maniacally and spouting a very memorable "Goodbye! Enjoy the ride!" prior to sending the soldiers to their deaths. There are even places where he sounds like SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker.

to:

* LargeHam: In Disney's dub, some of the pirates or incidental characters may qualify (not that it's a bad thing), but most definitely Cloris Leachman's performance as Dola in general (to good effect, as she arguably makes the character the most memorable in the whole movie); likewise, when Muska goes crazy at the end, Mark Hamill really gets to have fun, laughing maniacally and spouting a very memorable "Goodbye! Enjoy the ride!" prior to sending the soldiers to their deaths. There are even places where he sounds like SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker.ComicBook/TheJoker.
5th Feb '17 5:05:37 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AnAesop:
** Any kind of AppliedPhlebotinum or magic like Aetherium has both benign and destructive uses, and you can't have one without the other. It will inevitably be coveted by evil people who want to abuse it, and can only be protected and used wisely by someone like Sheeta whose heart is pure.

to:

* AnAesop:
**
AnAesop: Any kind of AppliedPhlebotinum or magic like Aetherium has both benign and destructive uses, and you can't have one without the other. It will inevitably be coveted by evil people who want to abuse it, and can only be protected and used wisely by someone like Sheeta whose heart is pure.
5th Feb '17 5:05:14 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ActionMom: Dola may not be a stunner ([[IWasQuiteALooker anymore]], if her portrait in her room is anything to go by), but she still leads her pirate clan (consisting of mostly her sons). And she's no [[ArmchairMilitary armchair admiral]] either.

to:

* ActionMom: Dola may not be a is no longer the stunner ([[IWasQuiteALooker anymore]], if her portrait in her room is anything she [[IWasQuiteALooker used to go by), be]], but she still leads her pirate clan (consisting consisting of mostly her sons). And sons, and she's no [[ArmchairMilitary armchair admiral]] either.



* AnAesop:
** Any kind of AppliedPhlebotinum or magic like Aetherium has both benign and destructive uses, and you can't have one without the other. It will inevitably be coveted by evil people who want to abuse it, and can only be protected and used wisely by someone like Sheeta whose heart is pure.



* AssholeVictim: [[spoiler: One of the most massive examples of this trope ever, as the whole army fall to their deaths from thousands of feet. Its raining men?]].

to:

* AssholeVictim: [[spoiler: One of [[spoiler:Musca dropping all the most massive examples of this trope ever, as soldiers who came with him to the whole army fall floating city thousands of feet to their deaths from thousands of feet. Its raining men?]].is a ruthless betrayal, but it's hard to feel sorry for all those assholes]].
5th Feb '17 7:24:12 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike: The chapter of Jonathan Swift's ''GulliversTravels'' dealing with a floating island by the name of "Laputa" was actually a scathing satire on scientists and the British royal family, both of whom Swift cordially despised. The name was intentionally derived from one of the worst Spanish epithets--"la puta," which loosely translates as "the whore"--partly as a further insult, and partly for the sake of an etymological joke. His idiot-savant scientists [[CanisLatinicus assumed the name derived from Greek or Latin]], when its true origin was obvious to the readers. However, given that this work was centuries old and in another language, Miyazaki [[WeirdAlEffect was innocent of the name's true derivation]] when he decided to base his movie on the works of Swift and Jules Verne. Consequently, many international releases drop the "Laputa:" from the beginning of the title.

to:

* InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike: The chapter of Jonathan Swift's ''GulliversTravels'' ''Literature/GulliversTravels'' dealing with a floating island by the name of "Laputa" was actually a scathing satire on scientists and the British royal family, both of whom Swift cordially despised. The name was intentionally derived from one of the worst Spanish epithets--"la puta," which loosely translates as "the whore"--partly as a further insult, and partly for the sake of an etymological joke. His idiot-savant scientists [[CanisLatinicus assumed the name derived from Greek or Latin]], when its true origin was obvious to the readers. However, given that this work was centuries old and in another language, Miyazaki [[WeirdAlEffect was innocent of the name's true derivation]] when he decided to base his movie on the works of Swift and Jules Verne. Consequently, many international releases drop the "Laputa:" from the beginning of the title.
28th Jan '17 5:35:35 AM Owlorange1995
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ShabbyHeroesWellDressedVillains: Pazu wears work clothes and Sheeta wears a plain dress. For his part, [[BigBad Muska]] wears a fine maroon suit.
23rd Jan '17 11:11:21 AM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike: The chapter of Jonathan Swift's ''GulliversTravels'' dealing with a floating island by the name of "Laputa" was actually a scathing satire on scientists and the British royal family, both of whom Swift cordially despised. The name was intentionally derived from one of the worst Spanish epithets--"la puta," which loosely translates as "the whore"--partly as a further insult, and partly for the sake of an etymological joke. His idiot-savant scientists [[CanisLatinicus assumed the name derived from Greek or Latin]], when its true origin was obvious to the readers. However, given that this work was centuries old and in another language, Miyazaki [[WeirdAlEffect was innocent of the name's true derivation]] when he decided to base his movie on the works of Swift and Jules Verne. Consequently, many international releases drop the "Laputa:" from the beginning of the title.



* InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike: The chapter of Jonathan Swift's ''GulliversTravels'' dealing with a floating island by the name of "Laputa" was actually a scathing satire on scientists and the British royal family, both of whom Swift cordially despised. The name was intentionally derived from one of the worst Spanish epithets--"la puta," which loosely translates as "the whore"--partly as a further insult, and partly for the sake of an etymological joke. His idiot-savant scientists [[CanisLatinicus assumed the name derived from Greek or Latin]], when its true origin was obvious to the readers. However, given that this work was centuries old and in another language, Miyazaki [[WeirdAlEffect was innocent of the name's true derivation]] when he decided to base his movie on the works of Swift and Jules Verne. Consequently, many international releases drop the "Laputa:" from the beginning of the title.
23rd Jan '17 11:10:24 AM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* UnfortunateName: The chapter of Jonathan Swift's ''GulliversTravels'' dealing with a floating island by the name of "Laputa" was actually a scathing satire on scientists and the British royal family, both of whom Swift cordially despised. The name was intentionally derived from one of the worst Spanish epithets--"la puta," which loosely translates as "the whore"--partly as a further insult, and partly for the sake of an etymological joke. His idiot-savant scientists assumed the name derived from Greek or Latin, when its true origin was obvious to the readers. However, given that this work was centuries old and in another language, Miyazaki [[WeirdAlEffect was innocent of the name's true derivation]] when he decided to base his movie on the works of Swift and Jules Verne. Consequently, many international releases drop the "Laputa:" from the beginning of the title.

to:

* UnfortunateName: InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike: The chapter of Jonathan Swift's ''GulliversTravels'' dealing with a floating island by the name of "Laputa" was actually a scathing satire on scientists and the British royal family, both of whom Swift cordially despised. The name was intentionally derived from one of the worst Spanish epithets--"la puta," which loosely translates as "the whore"--partly as a further insult, and partly for the sake of an etymological joke. His idiot-savant scientists [[CanisLatinicus assumed the name derived from Greek or Latin, Latin]], when its true origin was obvious to the readers. However, given that this work was centuries old and in another language, Miyazaki [[WeirdAlEffect was innocent of the name's true derivation]] when he decided to base his movie on the works of Swift and Jules Verne. Consequently, many international releases drop the "Laputa:" from the beginning of the title.
25th Nov '16 5:35:00 AM Robotech_Master
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* UnfortunateName: The chapter of Jonathan Swift's ''GulliversTravels'' dealing with a floating island by the name of "Laputa" was actually a scathing satire on scientists and the British royal family, both of whom Swift cordially despised. The name was intentionally derived from one of the worst Spanish epithets--"la puta," which loosely translates as "the whore"--partly as a further insult, and partly for the sake of an etymological joke. His idiot-savant scientists assumed the name derived from Greek or Latin, when its true origin was obvious to the readers. However, given that this work was centuries old and in another language, Miyazaki [[WeirdAlEffect was innocent of the name's true derivation]] when he decided to base his movie on the works of Swift and Jules Verne. Consequently, most international releases drop the "Laputa:" from the beginning of the title.

to:

* UnfortunateName: The chapter of Jonathan Swift's ''GulliversTravels'' dealing with a floating island by the name of "Laputa" was actually a scathing satire on scientists and the British royal family, both of whom Swift cordially despised. The name was intentionally derived from one of the worst Spanish epithets--"la puta," which loosely translates as "the whore"--partly as a further insult, and partly for the sake of an etymological joke. His idiot-savant scientists assumed the name derived from Greek or Latin, when its true origin was obvious to the readers. However, given that this work was centuries old and in another language, Miyazaki [[WeirdAlEffect was innocent of the name's true derivation]] when he decided to base his movie on the works of Swift and Jules Verne. Consequently, most many international releases drop the "Laputa:" from the beginning of the title.
25th Nov '16 5:22:28 AM Robotech_Master
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WeirdAlEffect: The original "Laputa" was a floating island of idiot-savants, named after a Spanish epithet and intended as a scathing TakeThat satire against scientists and British royalty. (The satire was so very dire that part of that chapter of ''GulliversTravels''--in which Laputa went around dropping rocks on nations it didn't like--had to be censored on its original publication. When Isaac Asimov did an annotated version of the book, he was so nettled by it, centuries later, that he felt the need to spend much of a page in fine print coming to scientists' defense!) Whether Miyazaki knew this or not, his version of "Laputa" was played straight as a place of higher science and learning--and he also titled his movie after that island's unfortunate name. (See UnfortunateName, above.)
25th Nov '16 5:21:20 AM Robotech_Master
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* UnfortunateName: In Spanish, "la puta" means "the whore."

to:

* UnfortunateName: In Spanish, "la puta" means The chapter of Jonathan Swift's ''GulliversTravels'' dealing with a floating island by the name of "Laputa" was actually a scathing satire on scientists and the British royal family, both of whom Swift cordially despised. The name was intentionally derived from one of the worst Spanish epithets--"la puta," which loosely translates as "the whore."whore"--partly as a further insult, and partly for the sake of an etymological joke. His idiot-savant scientists assumed the name derived from Greek or Latin, when its true origin was obvious to the readers. However, given that this work was centuries old and in another language, Miyazaki [[WeirdAlEffect was innocent of the name's true derivation]] when he decided to base his movie on the works of Swift and Jules Verne. Consequently, most international releases drop the "Laputa:" from the beginning of the title.


Added DiffLines:

* WeirdAlEffect: The original "Laputa" was a floating island of idiot-savants, named after a Spanish epithet and intended as a scathing TakeThat satire against scientists and British royalty. (The satire was so very dire that part of that chapter of ''GulliversTravels''--in which Laputa went around dropping rocks on nations it didn't like--had to be censored on its original publication. When Isaac Asimov did an annotated version of the book, he was so nettled by it, centuries later, that he felt the need to spend much of a page in fine print coming to scientists' defense!) Whether Miyazaki knew this or not, his version of "Laputa" was played straight as a place of higher science and learning--and he also titled his movie after that island's unfortunate name. (See UnfortunateName, above.)
This list shows the last 10 events of 168. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Anime.CastleInTheSky