History Analysis / BlazeUnion

16th Dec '15 7:06:43 PM Doug86
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Focusing back in on the scene in question, here we have Gulcasa taking another step forward into [[GrowingUpSucks the grim and jaded realm of adulthood]], choosing to accept the willing sacrifice of a subordinate in order to preserve his own life and the ensure the survival of Gram Blaze's ideals, which Garlot probably couldn't have accomplished. Adding the suggestive dialogue and the SexIsViolence motif back in makes the scene a direct metaphor for SexAsARiteOfPassage, and Gulcasa's final transition into becoming an adult. Meanwhile Medoute spies on them from the shadows, and thus their secret is "outed".

to:

Focusing back in on the scene in question, here we have Gulcasa taking another step forward into [[GrowingUpSucks the grim and jaded realm of adulthood]], choosing to accept the willing sacrifice of a subordinate in order to preserve his own life and the ensure the survival of Gram Blaze's ideals, which Garlot probably couldn't have accomplished. Adding the suggestive dialogue and the SexIsViolence motif back in makes the scene a direct metaphor for SexAsARiteOfPassage, SexAsRiteOfPassage, and Gulcasa's final transition into becoming an adult. Meanwhile Medoute spies on them from the shadows, and thus their secret is "outed".
29th Nov '13 4:43:28 PM nombretomado
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This is driven home at last in 6c-7, the final battle. In ''YggdraUnion'', ''YggdraUnison'', and the other two paths of ''BlazeUnion'', even after being repeatedly foiled, Nessiah always dons his best {{troll}}face and walks into the worst of situations laughing at and mocking his opponents, refusing to show any pressure he's feeling; in this final battlefield, he cannot muster that facade. Nessiah walks into the confrontation dead serious, desperate, clinging to his angelic blood as the only real advantage he has left over the humans, and [[ThisCannotBe trying to protect his splintering mind by rejecting any evidence that he might not be able to stop Gram Blaze now]]. The gap between the charismatic MagnificentBastard Nessiah is in the rest of the series and the way he is presented in the C route--with the only significant difference remaining between him and the run-of-the-mill bit villain being his point-blank refusal to go into a MotiveRant--is all that's needed to impress to players that something is very, very wrong with this picture.

to:

This is driven home at last in 6c-7, the final battle. In ''YggdraUnion'', ''YggdraUnison'', and the other two paths of ''BlazeUnion'', ''VideoGame/BlazeUnion'', even after being repeatedly foiled, Nessiah always dons his best {{troll}}face and walks into the worst of situations laughing at and mocking his opponents, refusing to show any pressure he's feeling; in this final battlefield, he cannot muster that facade. Nessiah walks into the confrontation dead serious, desperate, clinging to his angelic blood as the only real advantage he has left over the humans, and [[ThisCannotBe trying to protect his splintering mind by rejecting any evidence that he might not be able to stop Gram Blaze now]]. The gap between the charismatic MagnificentBastard Nessiah is in the rest of the series and the way he is presented in the C route--with the only significant difference remaining between him and the run-of-the-mill bit villain being his point-blank refusal to go into a MotiveRant--is all that's needed to impress to players that something is very, very wrong with this picture.



Although this archetype is modernized in ''BlazeUnion'' and certainly isn't the only thing going on in this part of the story, the imprint of Confucianism can clearly be seen on the A route. The old Bronquian monarchy is falling apart: Ike was easily manipulated by the corrupt court and killed by the corrupt military; Soltier does not have the political skill to hold his own between said court and military, and decides to govern using fear in order to exert what influence he can. Obviously, this does not work, and the corruption spreads throughout the nobility, with bandits riddling the country like a cancer. Soltier's own childlessness despite the ready presence of Lapis as his love interest, along with the illnesses revealed in the C route, vaguely suggest infertility and help to depict the old regime as being barren.

to:

Although this archetype is modernized in ''BlazeUnion'' ''VideoGame/BlazeUnion'' and certainly isn't the only thing going on in this part of the story, the imprint of Confucianism can clearly be seen on the A route. The old Bronquian monarchy is falling apart: Ike was easily manipulated by the corrupt court and killed by the corrupt military; Soltier does not have the political skill to hold his own between said court and military, and decides to govern using fear in order to exert what influence he can. Obviously, this does not work, and the corruption spreads throughout the nobility, with bandits riddling the country like a cancer. Soltier's own childlessness despite the ready presence of Lapis as his love interest, along with the illnesses revealed in the C route, vaguely suggest infertility and help to depict the old regime as being barren.
28th Oct '13 3:38:17 PM JIKTV
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The final battle thus becomes an analogue to the much simpler ComingOutStory, with the added bonus of making Medoute's apparent lack of caring re: Nessiah egging Gulcasa on make a lot more sense. Rather than attacking Gulcasa's chosen partner, she comes up to him and tells him what she saw directly, her FantasticRacism taking on distinctive tones of FantasticHomophobia at last. He is, she says, betraying his bond with Siskier and using his grief as an "excuse" for why he clings to Nessiah and lets his blood run wild; and no amount of Gulcasa's protests that his feelings are genuine, he hasn't forgotten what Siskier meant to him, will never forget what she meant, and is still himself fall upon deaf ears. Medoute and Jenon take up the roles of the rejecting parties, refusing all of Gulcasa's attempts at reconciliation, and walk out of his life completely after their confrontation. The Imperial Army remains supportive, and sees nothing wrong with the adult he has become.

to:

The final battle thus becomes an analogue to the much simpler ComingOutStory, with the added bonus of making Medoute's apparent lack of caring re: Nessiah egging Gulcasa on make a lot more sense. Rather than attacking Gulcasa's chosen partner, she comes up to him and tells him what she saw directly, her FantasticRacism taking on distinctive tones of FantasticHomophobia [[HaveYouTriedNotBeingAMonster Fantastic Homophobia]] at last. He is, she says, betraying his bond with Siskier and using his grief as an "excuse" for why he clings to Nessiah and lets his blood run wild; and no amount of Gulcasa's protests that his feelings are genuine, he hasn't forgotten what Siskier meant to him, will never forget what she meant, and is still himself fall upon deaf ears. Medoute and Jenon take up the roles of the rejecting parties, refusing all of Gulcasa's attempts at reconciliation, and walk out of his life completely after their confrontation. The Imperial Army remains supportive, and sees nothing wrong with the adult he has become.
5th Apr '12 12:53:54 PM Autumncomet
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After this point, Emilia becomes an active member of the force; she takes great pleasure in fighting and pesters Garlot and the others into allowing her to take point in important tasks. Medoute speculates that this attitude comes from the encroachment of Brongaa's blood, but it is equally possible that Emilia is just [[TheBumblebee eager to prove that she is of use]] now that she is a full member of Gram Blaze. If the player continues to deploy Emilia, it means to her that she has become useful and is now the equal of the rest of the party, if only in battle.

to:

After this point, Emilia becomes an active member of the force; she takes great pleasure in fighting and pesters Garlot and the others into allowing her to take point in important tasks. Medoute speculates that this attitude comes from the encroachment of Brongaa's blood, but it is equally possible that Emilia is just [[TheBumblebee [[KidAppealCharacter eager to prove that she is of use]] now that she is a full member of Gram Blaze. If the player continues to deploy Emilia, it means to her that she has become useful and is now the equal of the rest of the party, if only in battle.
3rd Dec '11 11:35:40 AM Firebert
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With this, we may define Garlot's triggering stressor to be "the death or betrayal of members of the {{Nakama}}". Tiera was his home, but the most important thing to Garlot is the surrogate family of his friends, who accept and love him; this is an important base of support for any victim of abuse. For Garlot, his desire for greater strength is both the desire to not have to rely on anyone and in turn to become reliable; he must protect himself and everyone dear to him. For his loved ones to die or to turn on him means that he has failed in doing this.

to:

With this, we may define Garlot's triggering stressor to be "the death or betrayal of members of the {{Nakama}}".[[TrueCompanions nakama]]". Tiera was his home, but the most important thing to Garlot is the surrogate family of his friends, who accept and love him; this is an important base of support for any victim of abuse. For Garlot, his desire for greater strength is both the desire to not have to rely on anyone and in turn to become reliable; he must protect himself and everyone dear to him. For his loved ones to die or to turn on him means that he has failed in doing this.



* '''Route B:''' Because of Luciana's death, Gram Blaze runs straight into a confrontation with Fantasinia, specifically with Ordene and Alanjame. No matter what happens as a result--whether they are accepted or Aegina takes the throne in a coup d'etat--Nessiah will be in a place of great influence over the wielder of the Gran Centurio, be that the LawfulStupid already-proven UnwittingPawn Ordene, the young and impressionable Yggdra, or Aegina herself, who would see no reason to doubt a fellow member of the {{Nakama}}. If Fantasinia is toppled and Aegina has no interest in the Gran Centurio, Nessiah will even be able to take the sword himself. Whatever the case, he will be able to have direct control over its growth. (And the route ends with Aegina in possession of the Gran Centurio, which is still favorable to Nessiah.)

to:

* '''Route B:''' Because of Luciana's death, Gram Blaze runs straight into a confrontation with Fantasinia, specifically with Ordene and Alanjame. No matter what happens as a result--whether they are accepted or Aegina takes the throne in a coup d'etat--Nessiah will be in a place of great influence over the wielder of the Gran Centurio, be that the LawfulStupid already-proven UnwittingPawn Ordene, the young and impressionable Yggdra, or Aegina herself, who would see no reason to doubt a fellow member of the {{Nakama}}.[[TrueCompanions nakama]]. If Fantasinia is toppled and Aegina has no interest in the Gran Centurio, Nessiah will even be able to take the sword himself. Whatever the case, he will be able to have direct control over its growth. (And the route ends with Aegina in possession of the Gran Centurio, which is still favorable to Nessiah.)



Also consider the way that Luciana and Aegina talk in public compared to the selves that they show around Gram Blaze. In the "Compensation for Patronage" series of missions, Luciana introduces herself as "Luciana Art Albelt" and speaks of Marquis Albelt as her father, but when conversing with the {{Nakama}}, neither of the twins call Albelt anything other than their foster father, and even address him by name, which should be unthinkable to any child who loves their parents. The two of them cannot let go of their past, and thus see their fake surname only as a convenient mask to show to the public, not who they really are.

to:

Also consider the way that Luciana and Aegina talk in public compared to the selves that they show around Gram Blaze. In the "Compensation for Patronage" series of missions, Luciana introduces herself as "Luciana Art Albelt" and speaks of Marquis Albelt as her father, but when conversing with the {{Nakama}}, [[TrueCompanions nakama]], neither of the twins call Albelt anything other than their foster father, and even address him by name, which should be unthinkable to any child who loves their parents. The two of them cannot let go of their past, and thus see their fake surname only as a convenient mask to show to the public, not who they really are.
8th Apr '11 7:34:28 AM FeralPhoenix
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Additionally, the layout of Tiera recalls the plight of the untouchable underclass of Japanese society, the burakumin. Tiera is divided by a river. The right side is near bountiful plains and trade roads, and is home to the wealthy; the run-down ghetto of Nether is close to a small desert area, and the very poor are confined to it. There is a single bridge over the river that connects the two halves of the town, representative of the tenuous connection that exists over the huge gulf of the class divide. Historically, towns that had a significant burakumin population were constructed similarly, right down to the river and low number of bridges (a feature so iconic that it was used for the title of the classic Japanese novel ''Hashi no Nai Kawa''). The fact that Gulcasa, a member of the extreme poor, was born with Brongaa's power regardless of his social status and rose to the position of Emperor can be seen as criticism for the burakumin system, whose social stigma has finally begun to disappear in Japan over the past few decades (a time lag comparable to the gap between the end of racial segregation in America and the dissolution of racial discrimination, which is still in its dying throes at the beginning of the twenty-first century).

to:

Additionally, the layout of Tiera recalls the plight of the untouchable underclass of Japanese society, the burakumin. Tiera is divided by a river. The right side is near bountiful plains and trade roads, and is home to the wealthy; the run-down ghetto of Nether is close to a small desert area, and the very poor are confined to it. There is a single bridge over the river that connects the two halves of the town, representative of the tenuous connection that exists over the huge gulf of the class divide. Historically, towns that had a significant burakumin population were constructed similarly, right down to the river and low number of bridges (a feature so iconic that it was used for the title of the classic Japanese novel ''Hashi no Nai Kawa''). The fact that Gulcasa, a member of the extreme poor, was born with Brongaa's power regardless of his social status and rose to the position of Emperor can be seen as criticism for the burakumin system, whose social stigma has finally begun to disappear in Japan over the past few decades (a time lag comparable to the gap between the end of racial segregation in America and the dissolution of racial discrimination, which is still in its dying throes at the beginning of the twenty-first century).century).

!Lost Boys
Something interesting to note is that nearly all members of Gram Blaze were either rejected by their parents or creators (Garlot, Nessiah, Luciana and Aegina, Eudy, Eater, Zilva) or lost their families out of traumatic incidents beyond their control (Siskier, Eimi, Sleip, Leon and Elena).

In the A route, Baldus places himself with the first group when persuaded by Gulcasa and Nessiah to join the revolution, considering himself misused by Soltier; also interesting is that the three characters who betray the group (Velleman, Jenon, and Medoute) have all previously abandoned their own families.

Out of the remaining characters, Pamela can be placed in the third group (runaways) due to her travels outside of Yumira, Byff joins the third group in route B (where he chooses to remain with the party rather than keep pursuing the Revelation), and Mizer discusses how close he has previously come to joining the second group (orphans) due to poverty. Baretreenu would fit in the "runaway" group as well.
5th Feb '11 12:38:36 PM FeralPhoenix
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!Confucianism and the A Route

to:

!Confucianism and the A RouteRoute
The concept of a corrupt or otherwise incompetent ruler being usurped and replaced by a person who values the lives of others above his own is an old Chinese archetype whose roots can be traced back to Confucianism. Confucius' teachings state that people should learn to care for and consider others in their social circle, and that by doing so and having their innate goodness inspire others, gradually whole communities will be transformed to operate cooperatively. Especially if a ruler were to govern with this worldview, Confucians would argue that this could set off a positive behavioral metamorphosis throughout a whole country.

Although this archetype is modernized in ''BlazeUnion'' and certainly isn't the only thing going on in this part of the story, the imprint of Confucianism can clearly be seen on the A route. The old Bronquian monarchy is falling apart: Ike was easily manipulated by the corrupt court and killed by the corrupt military; Soltier does not have the political skill to hold his own between said court and military, and decides to govern using fear in order to exert what influence he can. Obviously, this does not work, and the corruption spreads throughout the nobility, with bandits riddling the country like a cancer. Soltier's own childlessness despite the ready presence of Lapis as his love interest, along with the illnesses revealed in the C route, vaguely suggest infertility and help to depict the old regime as being barren.

In comparison, Gulcasa cares deeply for the quality of life of the people, and has spent the entire game going out of his way to smite corruption, rescue and [[TheParagon inspire]] the poor and middle class, and does not consider his life to be all that important in the grand scheme--to the point where he has to be forced into killing a {{mook}} to save himself. He loves his comrades deeply, and is loved by them in return; even the romantic aspirations of his [[ObliviousToLove unnoticed]] UnwantedHarem provide a sharp contrast of fertility and possibility to Soltier's own barrenness. When Gulcasa is finally crowned at the end of the game, his new subjects start out ambivalent, putting up with him simply because he's better than the alternative--until they actually see him and hear him speak. Their opinion of him does a drastic reversal as they hear of his ideals and realize how much he actually cares for them as individuals, instead of treating them as worthless the way the old regime did. Gulcasa wipes out the corrupt system by shifting the form of government from monarchy to dictatorship, which is gratefully received by the people; by the time of ''YggdraUnion'' he has achieved a well-earned HundredPercentAdorationRating from his teammates and his populace. Gulcasa knows a love for the people that is blind to gender, race, and class; this strongly parallels the values of the Confucian tradition.

!!Other Parallels to East Asian History
Although it's vaguely implied that his carrying Brongaa's blood might have qualified him as a successor to Soltier in the C route, Gulcasa's ascension from illiterate, abused peasant to beloved emperor in route A has parallels to the founding of the Ming dynasty in Chinese history. Its first ruler, the Hongwu Emperor, also rose to his station from low-class beginnings, and the Ming dynasty directly followed the rule of the Mongolian Yuan dynasty, a period in time that prevented China from having its own Industrial Revolution and caused its state as a country of learning to suffer deeply.

Additionally, the layout of Tiera recalls the plight of the untouchable underclass of Japanese society, the burakumin. Tiera is divided by a river. The right side is near bountiful plains and trade roads, and is home to the wealthy; the run-down ghetto of Nether is close to a small desert area, and the very poor are confined to it. There is a single bridge over the river that connects the two halves of the town, representative of the tenuous connection that exists over the huge gulf of the class divide. Historically, towns that had a significant burakumin population were constructed similarly, right down to the river and low number of bridges (a feature so iconic that it was used for the title of the classic Japanese novel ''Hashi no Nai Kawa''). The fact that Gulcasa, a member of the extreme poor, was born with Brongaa's power regardless of his social status and rose to the position of Emperor can be seen as criticism for the burakumin system, whose social stigma has finally begun to disappear in Japan over the past few decades (a time lag comparable to the gap between the end of racial segregation in America and the dissolution of racial discrimination, which is still in its dying throes at the beginning of the twenty-first century).
27th Jan '11 10:22:57 AM FeralPhoenix
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And interestingly enough, ''YggdraUnison'' has it that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Gulcasa has already lost his virginity]]. Make of ''that'' what you will.

to:

And interestingly enough, ''YggdraUnison'' has it that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Gulcasa has already lost his virginity]]. Make of ''that'' what you will.will.

!Confucianism and the A Route
29th Dec '10 9:55:30 PM FeralPhoenix
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And since after all Nessiah didn't help to raise Gulcasa, there are no parental undertones in their friendship, only romantic ones.

to:

And since after all Nessiah didn't help to raise Gulcasa, there are no parental undertones in their friendship, only romantic ones.ones.

Focusing back in on the scene in question, here we have Gulcasa taking another step forward into [[GrowingUpSucks the grim and jaded realm of adulthood]], choosing to accept the willing sacrifice of a subordinate in order to preserve his own life and the ensure the survival of Gram Blaze's ideals, which Garlot probably couldn't have accomplished. Adding the suggestive dialogue and the SexIsViolence motif back in makes the scene a direct metaphor for SexAsARiteOfPassage, and Gulcasa's final transition into becoming an adult. Meanwhile Medoute spies on them from the shadows, and thus their secret is "outed".

The final battle thus becomes an analogue to the much simpler ComingOutStory, with the added bonus of making Medoute's apparent lack of caring re: Nessiah egging Gulcasa on make a lot more sense. Rather than attacking Gulcasa's chosen partner, she comes up to him and tells him what she saw directly, her FantasticRacism taking on distinctive tones of FantasticHomophobia at last. He is, she says, betraying his bond with Siskier and using his grief as an "excuse" for why he clings to Nessiah and lets his blood run wild; and no amount of Gulcasa's protests that his feelings are genuine, he hasn't forgotten what Siskier meant to him, will never forget what she meant, and is still himself fall upon deaf ears. Medoute and Jenon take up the roles of the rejecting parties, refusing all of Gulcasa's attempts at reconciliation, and walk out of his life completely after their confrontation. The Imperial Army remains supportive, and sees nothing wrong with the adult he has become.

And interestingly enough, ''YggdraUnison'' has it that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Gulcasa has already lost his virginity]]. Make of ''that'' what you will.
29th Dec '10 9:25:37 PM FeralPhoenix
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The fourth battlefield of Chapter 6a involves a great deal of Jenon and Medoute talking back and forth about the ways that Garlot the child and Gulcasa the adult are different, attributing the changes in his demeanor to [[FantasticRacism his demon blood]] rather than [[TraumaCongaLine the rather brutal series of emotional upheavals he's just suffered through]]. While Gulcasa himself is not behaving all that much differently (other than getting annoyed when Jenon insists on calling him "Garlot"), the player is invited to sympathize with Jenon and Medoute by the soundtrack, the tense BGM that plays as a backdrop to the majority of the scenes focusing on Gulcasa implying that [[UnfortunateImplications there's something unsettling at work here]].

to:

The fourth battlefield of Chapter 6a involves a great deal of Jenon and Medoute talking back and forth about the ways that Garlot the child and Gulcasa the adult are different, attributing the changes in his demeanor to [[FantasticRacism his demon blood]] rather than [[TraumaCongaLine the rather brutal series of emotional upheavals he's just suffered through]]. While Gulcasa himself is not behaving all that much differently (other than getting annoyed when Jenon insists on calling him "Garlot"), the player is invited to sympathize with Jenon and Medoute by the soundtrack, the tense BGM that plays as a backdrop to the majority of the scenes focusing on Gulcasa implying that [[UnfortunateImplications there's something unsettling at work here]]. And aside from his shiny new armor and [[FailureKnight his desperation to succeed]], the main thing that's different about Gulcasa is that he and Nessiah are suddenly joined at the hip.

This treatment of Gulcasa's blood as a sinister thing continues throughout the fifth battlefield, despite the fact that none of his companions other than Jenon and Medoute see anything wrong with him, and this comes to a head in the scene at the very end of the battle.

The SexIsViolence themes used in the treatment of the awakened Emilia in route B are revisited here: Gulcasa suddenly collapses, no longer able to cope with the physical stress of his newfound abilities. It is Nessiah who comes to his rescue, and explains that if Brongaa's overactive bloodlust is not sated quickly, Gulcasa's own life will be in danger. While Gulcasa is hesitant to save himself at the expense of someone else's life, the urgency of the situation and his rapidly worsening condition allow Nessiah to coerce him into sacrificing an apparently willing mook. This adds to Gulcasa's power, saves his life, and brings him to orgasm. The dialogue throughout the scene is intensely intimate and sexually charged, and quite a few fans have noted that with the HumanSacrifice references removed, it would not be out of place at all in some form of {{eroge}} featuring [[MateOrDie extenuating circumstances]].

Drawing the lens back a bit, Gulcasa's situation in the second half of the chapter also depicts a slow shift within the core of Gram Blaze. Previously, Garlot was surrounded by not-quite-mother-yet-not-quite-love-interest Siskier, best friend Jenon, sisterly mentor Medoute, and distant father figure Velleman. Now he finds himself bereft of all of them: Siskier and Velleman are dead, grief and Velleman's SadisticChoice have driven a rift between Gulcasa and Jenon, and Medoute is suspicious of his blood. As Gulcasa is codependent and cannot function without support from his friends and surrogate family, all of these roles [[ReplacementGoldfish must needs be refilled]]. Leon takes the role of supportive best friend. Emilia, who despite her youth knows and understands more of their heritage than Gulcasa, becomes a sort of mentor to help him cope with his blood. The newly recruited Baldus assumes Velleman's now-empty role. This leaves only that of Siskier open, and Nessiah is indeed the closest to Gulcasa out of everyone left in the army. Throughout the rest of the story, Nessiah leaves his side exactly twice.

And since after all Nessiah didn't help to raise Gulcasa, there are no parental undertones in their friendship, only romantic ones.
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