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Kenneth Branaugh returns to Scanadanavia and fails
Watching "Thor", I received a whole new experience that I never had while at the movie theater,http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/review_add.php?g=Film&tt=Thor and not in a good way.

It was the first time I had felt bored enough to text while watching a movie.

But, that's not start this review out being totally critical. Let's start with the good parts first:

I loved Loki. Now, I can barely tell between your middle school play lead and an Oscar winner (some with more refined taste might say that there's none) but I felt that was one of the best performances I've ever seen. His nuanced, submissive posture with the puppy-dog eyes look instantly captured me, despite me well knowing of his villainous comic book history. His deference and seeming timidness simply made him so sympathetic to me.

However, the good parts pretty much end there. None of the characters are likable as Loki is, perhaps not even combined. First, the movie starts of with Jane Foster, retooled as a physicist. Despite her talk of her supposed love of physics and her reference to Arthur C. Clarke's famous magic and technology line, nothing about her seemed remotely intelligent at all. Then we have two other characters, her mentor-advisor and their assistant, who fail to contribute anything substantial to the plot.

The titular character is not much better. I'm not too familiar with his original personality, but whoever this is in the movie is complete jerk, who recklessly endangers his kingdom with his group of god buddies (who seem to lack names) like some stereotypical bonehead. He is supposed to become heroic, but nothing in the movie actually seems like it would give a well-written character development. So he changes because of...magic?

The absolute worst part of this movie was the attempted romance. Natalie Portman's character and Thor have absolutely no chemistry whatsoever, but it appears that it's her love is what changes Thor's ways for the better. I think Twilight did the romance better.

For someone who was allowed directed the masterpiece Hamlet, this is sure a disappointment. Sure "Thor" the comic book is no Shakespeare, but someone like Kenneth with such supposed ability should've been able to come up with something better.
I deeply disagree, especially on the part about Thor himself. To me, he was the most interesting character, and not just because of his kickass powers. He was a warrior, proud, loud, and with a sense of right and wrong. He didn't go around picking fights, really. The Frost Giants attempted something first, he wanted to make them pay and find answers. True, he did go overboard, but he isn't violent for the sake of it.

That, and in what little time we see of him after he finds out he can't lift his hammer and before his friends find him, he pretty much accepts it. Its like he just said, 'I'm stuck here. Might as well make the best of it.' The scene where he's serving food to his new, mortal friends shows his change. He seems at peace with what has happened.

Hell, I can't help but think that if things had been different, Thor would have become a scientist and would continue to help Jane and her team study and learn more about other worlds and traveling between them.
comment #9978 MasterZero 17th Sep 11
I'm glad I'm not the only one who felt Loki was absolutely amazing in that movie and very likeable and sympathetic. Even when the lies and the manipulation came out it just added to the brilliance of his character and I found myself making excuses for him
comment #9993 Tomwithnonumbers 17th Sep 11
I disagree about the chemistry. In fact I'd say it was the most likeable facet of a somewhat average/bland movie. I liked the fact that the women (I can't remember her name) wasn't made into a shrill, disapproving ice woman, which would have been the obvious and generic choice in a movie such as this. She seems jolly, and friendly, and warms to Thor's puppy dog like antics straight away. Likewise, I liked Thor's puppy dog like antics. Obviously he is arrogant and just a bit thick, but his grinning buffoonery made we warm up to him straight away. I can't fault the chemistry at all.

I do however fault the ugly aesthetics. I do not envision a norse Kingdom of the Gods as looking like a CGI stack of organ pipes. Likewise, the tacky looking outfits seem at total odds with what these characters should look like in my mind. Obviously that is a very personal opinion, and they were probably trying to stick to the comics or something, but am I really the only one who imagines the beer halls of Valhalla to look a bit more...well, like beer halls?

I also liked Loki at first, but when he decides to try and duke it out with Thor at the end...well there was no tension to that fight. Thor is already established as the toughest guy in the universe once he has his hammer, so a battle with the weakling loki is going to seem very one sided. Surely Loki would be smart enough to realise that getting into a scrap with Thor would be a terrible idea? Loki should have been using his wits more in the climax, and not just trying to hit people with sticks.
comment #10103 maninahat 20th Sep 11
I think Twilight did the romance better.

Now that's harsh!

In fact, I didn't feel like it was meant to be a romance at all. The scene when she kisses him is the only real indication for a relationship other than friendship. Maybe she just wanted to fuck him, I don't know, but to me they didn't seem like they were in love, just like they find each other interesting and likable.

@ maninahat

Well, my friend and I who watched it said, too, they should have chosen better outfits and then we remembered the film is based on a comic and most definitely modelled the costumes after that source material.
comment #12368 Panthera 17th Jan 12
Wow, you guys really didn't like this movie. I personally enjoyed Thor quite a bit. The biggest problem I have with it is the same problem I have with Captain America: it is too centered on the upcoming Avengers movie to properly create its own identity (though admittedly Cap does succeed more than Thor).

Because it's so tied to the Avengers it basically lives or dies on "Rule of Cool" and how the audience views it. The common reaction really seems to have been "good, not great" or "not bad" (it was financially successful, getting a sequel yadda yadda yadda).

I love that Thor was able to be both the big action hero and the movies butt monkey at the same time. The fish out of water elements work very well— actually all the earth-based comedic elements work very well. Most of what doesn't work is Asgard (I agree- it doesn't seem like a romantic relationship in this film- though there is definitely a little UST going on, which seems like their out for plotting the sequel).

comment #12383 Madcapunlimited 18th Jan 12
I do however fault the ugly aesthetics. I do not envision a norse Kingdom of the Gods as looking like a CGI stack of organ pipes. Likewise, the tacky looking outfits seem at total odds with what these characters should look like in my mind. Obviously that is a very personal opinion, and they were probably trying to stick to the comics or something, but am I really the only one who imagines the beer halls of Valhalla to look a bit more...well, like beer halls?
Wow, really? I loved the aesthetic. It was very unique-looking, and I thought its garishness made it feel much more alien and magical.

Anyway, I liked Loki, I liked Thor himself, I liked the visuals outside of Jotunheim (Which was way too dark). I thought the rest was meh to okay. Overall, I liked the movie.
comment #12385 Scardoll 18th Jan 12 (edited by: Scardoll)
There was almost a Flash Gordon-esque, gaudy charm to the Norse world visuals (almost). But as I said, it didn't really resemble anything that would imply the city of an adventure loving, beer swilling, viking pantheon. What makes it worse is that the earth setting is an ugly, uninteresting, desert wasteland. Alright, I understand the need for a podunk, unlikeable dump for the sake of contrast (to show how far Thor had fallen), but I think they could have picked a more original, visually interesting setting. Colourwise, the sands of the desert weren't very far from the golden walls of Asgard, so it didn't even contrast like it should. It needed somewhere with more greens and blues.
comment #12386 maninahat 18th Jan 12
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