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Reviews Comments: A Progressive Ode To Conformism Wreck It Ralph film/book review by Meira

\"Wreck It Ralph\" begins with an interesting premise, but leaves her halfway, under the weight of the \'important message\' the film purports to pass, about self-acceptance and tolerance of diversity. But the script does so in such a drastic way that it turns the movie into an ode to conformism, since any attempt to alter the status quo could lead to the destruction of the universe. The only acceptable change is the restoration of a good and old old order, with the return of power to a princess who is too good to wish to be a princess. As for the social pariah, who supposedly should be the protagonist, he must resign himself to his position given to him by destiny, just as the hero is a hero by a prior determination, and thus will be entitled to all the prizes and a beautiful love interest. Ralph can at most obtain the recognition by the gentrified elite of their indispensable role in the operation of the game, which is too obvious, but without effective improvement of their situation. \"Wreck It Ralph\" is the incarnation of a progressive mentality that of so dominant, no longer wants real change of the social order. Mega M Ind and Despicable Me, two films that were quite compared to Wreck It Ralph, are actually much superior because they recognize the possibility of their protagonists real change the direction of their lives.

Comments

  • Bastard1
  • 23rd Dec 17
Viewing a video game movie—beholden as it is to the conventions of a mostly pre-programmed medium just to avoid becoming just another \"what if X had feelings\" movie—plot through a lens of that demands complete real-life applicability was your mistake more than theirs. Your approach must be adaptable to the rules that govern any given continuity.
  • Immortalbear
  • 23rd Dec 17
I agree with Bastard 1, but also say that Wreck-It Ralph was actually fine with his ability to wreck things, he was just upset about the prejudice put toward him by the other characters in his game. Not everyone wishes to climb the mythical ladder to reach the apex of all desires. Many simply want to have attention and appreciation for what they provide in the community. Ralph compromises the drawbacks of his role (the film shows all roles have a drawback of some kind, even the so-called elite are simply bit characters, Ralph is one actually remembered by the players) in exchange for appreciation and benefits, like the building of a house and recieving a cake,

What\'s this progressive hate anyway? You speak as if this film has some sort of brainwashing political agenda that isn\'t there.

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