Tropers Down Under (I mean Australia you gutter-noggins):

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My family went on a vacation to the West Coast not too long (read: 2 or 3 years) ago. This trip began and ended on the Indian Pacific, which usually stops in the tiny village of Cook. This is mainly so the villagers can refuel the train, and the train can provide the villagers with... pretty much everything that isn't fuel.

Before we got back on the train, we were each given a piece of paper that said something along the lines of: "Thank you for visiting Cook. Population: 4 people, 2 dogs, ..., 3 million flies." They weren't kidding about the flies — those fuckers wouldn't leave me alone!!

edited 10th Aug '11 12:25:54 AM by FuschlatzOReilly

Action is Virtue. Idleness is Vice.
Flies...then maggots...remind me to never visit that place.
Follow your passion, be prepared to work hard and sacrifice, and, above all, don't let anyone limit your dreams. - Donovan Daily

Actually, my point is that the animals mostly stay away from groups of people that are large enough. It's been that way for millenia, actually.

Therefore, even if you just stay within the towns that aren't so small as to be negligible, you should be safe.

edited 10th Aug '11 1:10:12 AM by FuschlatzOReilly

名無しさん
I never really considered flies a danger, but they are gross and far too numerous. I remember a camping trip from when I was small. It was a hot day, and we went hiking. My dad's back was so thickly covered in flies that you could barely see his shirt.

Don't worry, though. You don't see the maggots unless you go through compost or happen upon an animal carcass.
Once I squashed a fly and maggots came out. ._.

FABRICATI DIEM, PVNC.
106 betterthanstrawberry10th Aug 2011 02:06:35 AM from back in the atmosphere.
Dreaming out loud.
Well, there are lots of countries with dangerous animals and natural phenomena and no readily available equivalent of 911, 112 or 000... :/
Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science.
107 LoniJay10th Aug 2011 02:38:26 AM from Australia , Relationship Status: Pining for the fjords
The wildlife here isn't all that dangerous. You just have to knock out your boots before you put them on, and wear gloves and long pants when you're gardening.

Cars are way more dangerous than the wildlife has ever been.
Be not afraid...
Aye, most of our snakes 'n things are actually pretty shy — they'll [s]run[/s] slither away if you give them half a chance.
I've never actually seen one of our famous snakes, or even a redback.

I was nearly killed by a dropbear once though.
FABRICATI DIEM, PVNC.
Action is Virtue. Idleness is Vice.
[up] Awesome. Can you elaborate, if you won't mind?
Follow your passion, be prepared to work hard and sacrifice, and, above all, don't let anyone limit your dreams. - Donovan Daily

It's a long story, involving me doing really brave deeds while looking awesome like an Amazon, a katana, my robot dog and a really big fish. THIS big.

I rolled out of the way in time, but it was a close call.

FABRICATI DIEM, PVNC.
@Cookie. Liar. Drop bears don't exist. I've uncovered one of Australia's dirty secrets.

Sorry, I'm dropping by too. I may live in Australia some day as an exchange student.

edited 12th Aug '11 1:25:11 PM by Vanitas

@Cookie. Liar. Drop bears don't exist. I've uncovered one of Australia's dirty secrets.
That's what the trees want you to think. You've been suckered by disinformation.
Drop bears definitely exist. A guy in high school up in Darwin was killed by one a few years ago, when we had our hottest summer on record.
The Prodigal Returns
It's a sign of how infrequently I visit Troper Covens that I only found this now. Queenslander reporting.

The reason why dropbears are thought not to exist is because every sighting is followed by immediate death. Ever seen a victim of a dropbear attack? There's no head, just a body and a five metre circle of goop spatter. Nasty.

edited 12th Aug '11 9:04:45 PM by DarkDecapodian

Aww, did I hurt your widdle fee-fees?
Your drop bears are as real as the chupacabra.

edited 13th Aug '11 1:19:14 AM by Vanitas

They are at least five times as real as the chupacabra!
Drop bears are the reason chupacabra are so hard to find. Completely separate continents, but they're still scared enough to hide their existence, on the off chance a DB manages to cross the sea.

edited 13th Aug '11 4:51:22 AM by 2Samildanach

Away on the wind~
They are at least five times as real as the chupacabra!

5 x 0 = 0
There are too many toasters in my chimney!
[up]Pfft, Cygan. PFFT.
121 MadassAlex20th Sep 2011 05:00:42 AM from the Middle Ages.
I am vexed!
Also, tourists are often in danger from dropbears if they are camping in the bush and set their tents up in dangerous areas. Doesn't get much coverage, but it's always a tragedy.

[lol]
122 betterthanstrawberry20th Sep 2011 05:22:02 AM from back in the atmosphere.
Dreaming out loud.
Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science.
Not dead yet.
Oh hey, this is a thing.

Queenslander checking in; I live about three hours north of Brisbane. And I have never heard of drop bears before this thread.
名無しさん
[up]Get back on your boat.
Not dead yet.
Only if you pay for the trip both ways. tongue

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