YMMV: Andrew Jackson Jihad

  • Crosses the Line Twice: Frequently and enthusiastically. They tend to tackle extremely loaded and personal topics such as alcoholism, suicide, homelessness, racism, and even Sean's dad abandoning him with a great deal of black comedy.
  • Cult Classic: People Who Can Eat People and Knife Man especially, but all of their studio albums could qualify.
  • Ear Worm: "Kokopelli Face Tattoo," "Fucc the Devil," "People II: The Reckoning," "Temple Grandin"
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: They're one of the few bands in folk-punk that have managed to break free from the label and gain fans even among people who don't like the genre.
    • Their most famous songs, "People II: The Reckoning" and "Big Bird," were never released as singles or given music videos.
  • Even Better Sequel: People who Can Eat People is this to Candy Cigarettes and Cap Guns.
    • Knife Man to Can't Maintain.
    • Depending on who you ask, Christmas Island might be this to Knife Man.
  • Heartwarming Moments: "Linda Ronstadt," "People."
    • Even though they're fairly depressing songs, the empathy and kindness of "People II 2: Still Peoplin'" and "Zombie by the Cranberries by Andrew Jackson Jihad" can put a smile on your face.
    • "Temple Grandin."
    • Their live concerts, which are so intense and cathartic that one reviewer noted that he'd "never seen more people cry at a show."
  • I Am Not Shazam: The band is, at its simplest, two people, neither being named Andrew.

  • Magnum Opus: Fans are split on whether it's Knife Man or Can't Maintain.
  • Nightmare Fuel: The description of God in "Rejoice".
    • The opening verse of "Bells & Whistles".
    • The frantic "Bad Bad Things," from the perspective of a serial killer, can be seriously unsettling if heard in the right mood.
    • "A Song Dedicated to the Memory of Stormy the Rabbit," a creepy, dirgelike waltz backed up by off-key horns. The strangeness of the lyrics just adds to the nightmarish atmosphere.
    • They managed to find a way to make kazoos unsettling- they're the odd buzzing noise in the background of "A Song Dedicated to the Memory of Stormy the Rabbit" and "Bad Bad Things."
    • "Coffin Dance."
  • Old Shame: Sean has said that he feels like some of the songs on Candy Cigarettes and Cap Guns were too judgmental, which is why the band doesn't play them live as much anymore.
    • In particular he's mentioned being uncomfortable with the early track "Ladykiller."
    • In this interview he expresses a dislike of "Scenesters" for its generally mean-spirited tone.
  • Signature Song: "People II: The Reckoning" or "Big Bird."
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: "American Tune," "No One," arguably "Zombie by the Cranberries by Andrew Jackson Jihad"
  • Tear Jerker: A LOT. Most of Knife Man qualifies- in spite of the humor throughout, it's still an extremely sad album. Special mention goes to "Backpack," "Free Bird," "Big Bird," "No One," and "People II 2: Still Peoplin'."
    • In spite of their comic titles, "Love in the Time of Human Papillomavirus" and "Love Will Fuck Us Apart" definitely qualify.
    • From Christmas Island: "Do Re and Me" (about the Heaven's Gate suicides), "Angel of Death," "I Wanna Rock Out in My Dreams," and "Linda Ronstadt" (which is more of the Tears of Joy variety).
  • The Woobie: If you didn't feel this way about Sean before, you probably will after "Big Bird."