History YouKeepUsingThatWord / LessPedantic

5th Feb '17 12:11:42 PM TropesForever
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* '''{{Muppet}}''', apart from use as an insult, is repeatedly used (even on ThisVeryWiki!) to refer to advanced rubber puppets of the type seen in ''Film/TheDarkCrystal'' and ''Series/{{Farscape}}''. In reality, Creator/JimHenson himself said that those characters are not Muppets, but rather [[http://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/Muppets_vs_Creatures Creatures]]. ''Muppet'' refers specifically to the felt-type characters seen in ''Series/SesameStreet'', ''Series/TheMuppetShow'' and ''Series/FraggleRock''. It's also a trademarked name, meaning that if Creator/{{Disney}} (the currect rights holder for the name) doesn't say something is a Muppet, it's not a Muppet. (*Cough*[[Franchise/StarWars Yoda]]*cough*)
1st Feb '17 4:48:18 PM HighCrate
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* '''Leonardo da Vinci'''. You don't call something by him a '''da Vinci''', just by '''Leonardo'''. Vinci is a location (Leonardo of Vinci). It's like saying something by Jerry of New York is created by "of New York." His full name was '''Leondaro di ser Piero da Vinci''' (Leonardo, son of Piero, from Vinci.)
1st Feb '17 4:30:47 PM AnotherGuy
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* '''Leonardo da Vinci'''. You don't call something by him a '''da Vinci''', just by '''Leonardo'''. Vinci is a location (Leonardo of Vinci). It's like saying something by Jerry of New York is created by "of New York." His full name was '''Leondaro di ser Piero da Vinci''' (Leonardo, son of Piero, from Vinci.)
21st Jan '17 7:37:23 PM Bootlebat
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** The same rule applies when two entities are specified, such as [[HalfLife "I never thought I'd see a resonance cascade, let alone create one"]]
5th Jan '17 6:05:37 PM JoieDeCombat
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* '''Literally''' is often used as a generic intensifier, a "smarter-sounding" substitute for "extremely" or similar. The irony is that the usage is most often figurative, when it ''actually'' means "not figuratively." Example of misuse: "It was literally a slaughter!" in reference to a sporting event, assuming said sport isn't a BloodSport. See LiteralMetaphor.[[note]]'''Really''' suffers from a similar problem; the cycle of words becoming meaningless intensifiers is ancient: "Very" comes from "verily", which means "truthfully."[[/note]] Then there are the people who correct this by saying "You mean 'figuratively'," as in [[http://xkcd.com/725/ this]] ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}''. That's only sort of right, as inserting that word into the sentence wouldn't achieve the desired effect; what they really mean to say is an ''actual'' intensifier like "extremely," and even that is probably redundant.

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* '''Literally''' is often used as a generic intensifier, a "smarter-sounding" substitute for "extremely" or similar. The irony is that the usage is most often figurative, when it ''actually'' means "not figuratively." Example of misuse: "It was literally a slaughter!" in reference to a sporting event, assuming said sport isn't a BloodSport. See LiteralMetaphor.[[note]]'''Really''' suffers from a similar problem; the cycle of words becoming meaningless intensifiers is ancient: "Very" comes from "verily", which means "truthfully."[[/note]] Then there are the people who correct this by saying "You mean 'figuratively'," as in [[http://xkcd.com/725/ this]] ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}''. That's only sort of right, as inserting that word into the sentence wouldn't achieve the desired effect; what they really mean to say is an ''actual'' intensifier like "extremely," and even that is probably redundant.[[note]]Incidentally, this isn't the first time a word has shifted from meaning "not figuratively" to being used as an intensifier. "Very" (from "verily") and "really" also have their roots in words meant to distinguish factual truth from exaggeration. Perhaps in time the original meaning of "literally" will have also become so diluted by being used for emphasis that we'll have to come up with another word to take its place.[[/note]]
5th Jan '17 5:17:56 PM Solicitr
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* A '''crescendo''' is NOT the loud climax of a piece of music or other sound -- the word you want is, well, '''climax.''' ''Crescendo'' (Italian: "I wax, I grow greater") refers to the ''process of getting louder'', an increase in volume over time, which ultimately may lead to a climax (or instead subside again in a '''decrescendo.''') "The noise rose to a crescendo" is flat-out WRONG, and will produce winces among the musically-trained.

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* A '''crescendo''' is NOT the loud climax of a piece of music or other sound -- the word you want is, well, '''climax.''' ''Crescendo'' (Italian: "I wax, I grow greater") refers to the ''process of getting louder'', an increase in volume over time, which ultimately may lead to a climax (or instead subside again in a '''decrescendo.''') "The noise rose to a crescendo" is flat-out WRONG, wrong, in fact semi-redundant (rather like "His speed increased to an acceleration"), and will produce winces among the musically-trained.
5th Jan '17 5:14:56 PM Solicitr
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* A '''crescendo''' is NOT the loud climax of a piece of music or other sound -- the word you want is, well, '''climax.''' ''Crescendo'' (Italian: "I wax, I grow greater'' refers to the ''process of getting louder'', an increase in volume over time, which ultimately may lead to a climax (or instead subside again in a '''decrescendo.''') "The noise rose to a crescendo'' is flat-out WRONG, and will produce winces among the musically-trained.

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* A '''crescendo''' is NOT the loud climax of a piece of music or other sound -- the word you want is, well, '''climax.''' ''Crescendo'' (Italian: "I wax, I grow greater'' greater") refers to the ''process of getting louder'', an increase in volume over time, which ultimately may lead to a climax (or instead subside again in a '''decrescendo.''') "The noise rose to a crescendo'' crescendo" is flat-out WRONG, and will produce winces among the musically-trained.
5th Jan '17 5:13:49 PM Solicitr
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* A ''crescendo'' is NOT the loud climax of a piece of music or other sound =- the word you want is, well, ''climax.'' ''Crescendo'' (Italian: "I wax, I grow greater'' refers to the process of getting louder, an increase in volume over time, which ultimately may lead to a climax (or instead subside again in a ''decrescendo.'') "The noise rose to a crescendo'' is flat-out WRONG, and will produce winces among the musically-trained.

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* A ''crescendo'' '''crescendo''' is NOT the loud climax of a piece of music or other sound =- -- the word you want is, well, ''climax.'' '''climax.''' ''Crescendo'' (Italian: "I wax, I grow greater'' refers to the process ''process of getting louder, louder'', an increase in volume over time, which ultimately may lead to a climax (or instead subside again in a ''decrescendo.'') '''decrescendo.''') "The noise rose to a crescendo'' is flat-out WRONG, and will produce winces among the musically-trained.
5th Jan '17 5:12:33 PM Solicitr
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* A ''crescendo'' is NOT the loud climax of a piece of music or other sound =- the word you want is, well, ''climax.'' ''Crescendo'' (Italian: "I wax, I grow greater'' refers to the process of getting louder, an increase in volume over time, which ultimately may lead to a climax (or instead subside again in a ''decrescendo.'') "The noise rose to a crescendo'' is flat-out WRONG, and will produce winces among the musically-trained.
30th Dec '16 2:22:59 PM Specialist290
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*** 'Scottish' is an adjective qualifying someone or something from Scotland. 'Scot' is a noun. While it's preferable to refer to people from Scotland as "the Scots" rather than "the Scottish"[[note]]though historically, the Scots -- or the Scoti -- were from Scotia, which was in fact a Roman name for ''Ireland''[[/note]], it is not wrong to refer to someone as Scottish by way of an adjective. On that note, the adjective is indeed 'Scottish'. Don't use the adjective 'Scotch' outside of Scotch whisky, Scotch eggs or Scotch pies.[[note]]However, at least as recently as Agatha Christie, "Scotch" and "Scotchman" were acceptable English idioms, no matter what the Scots themselves may have had to say about it.[[/note]]

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*** 'Scottish' is an adjective qualifying someone or something from Scotland. 'Scot' is a noun. While it's preferable to refer to people from Scotland as "the Scots" rather than "the Scottish"[[note]]though historically, the Scots -- or the Scoti -- were from Scotia, which was in fact a Roman name for ''Ireland''[[/note]], it is not wrong to refer to someone as Scottish by way of an adjective. On that note, the adjective is indeed 'Scottish'. Don't use the adjective 'Scotch' outside of Scotch whisky, Scotch eggs or Scotch pies.pies, at least not if you don't want to be [[https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/scotch#Verb scotched]] yourself.[[note]]However, at least as recently as Agatha Christie, "Scotch" and "Scotchman" were acceptable English idioms, no matter what the Scots themselves may have had to say about it.[[/note]]
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