History YouKeepUsingThatWord / LessPedantic

19th Feb '18 12:34:19 PM BrendanRizzo
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* A '''softlock''' is a particular kind of software freeze, in which the program still runs, but none of the user's input is functional. Beginning in 2017, some members of the ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' fandom have been using the word to refer to situations where the player cannot progress farther in the game, which is better known as being "{{unwinnable}}", or just plain "getting stuck". The root of this confusion appears to be that around that time, the [=YouTuber=] Pikasprey Yellow uploaded a video titled "Pokemon Hidden Content: Escaping Lorelei's Softlock", about one possible unwinnable scenario which completely takes control away from the player thanks to a design oversight, making it a true softlock. From this, his watchers generalized the word to ''all'' cases of UnwinnableByInsanity, even though none of the others qualify. Pikasprey himself has since begun a new video series titled "[=SoftlockPicking=]", about his Houdini-esque ways of escaping these "unwinnable" situations the viewers get him into, which unfortunately would appear to spread and perpetuate this incorrect usage.

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* A '''softlock''' is a particular kind of software freeze, in which the program still runs, but none of the user's input is functional. Beginning in 2017, some members of the ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' fandom have been using the word to refer to situations where the player cannot progress farther in the game, which is better known as being "{{unwinnable}}", or just plain "getting stuck". The root of this confusion appears to be that around that time, the [=YouTuber=] Pikasprey Yellow uploaded a video titled "Pokemon Hidden Content: Escaping "How to Escape Lorelei's Game-Ending Softlock", about one possible unwinnable scenario which completely takes control away from the player thanks to a design oversight, making it a true softlock. From this, his watchers generalized the word to ''all'' cases of UnwinnableByInsanity, even though none of the others qualify. Pikasprey himself has since begun a new video series titled "[=SoftlockPicking=]", about his Houdini-esque ways of escaping these "unwinnable" situations the viewers get him into, which unfortunately would appear to spread and perpetuate this incorrect usage.
19th Feb '18 12:30:56 PM BrendanRizzo
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* A '''softlock''' is a particular kind of software freeze, in which the program still runs, but none of the user's input is functional. Beginning in 2017, some members of the ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' fandom have been using the word to refer to situations where the player cannot progress farther in the game, which is better known as being "{{unwinnable}}", or just plain "getting stuck". The root of this confusion appears to be that around that time, the [=YouTuber=] Pikasprey Yellow uploaded a video titled "Pokemon Hidden Content: Escaping Lorelei's Softlock", about one possible unwinnable scenario which completely takes control away from the player thanks to a design oversight, making it a true softlock. From this, his watchers generalized the word to ''all'' cases of UnwinnableByInsanity, even though none of the others qualify. Pikasprey himself has since begun a new video series titled "[=SoftlockPicking=]", about his Houdini-esque ways of escaping these "unwinnable" situations the viewers get him into, which unfortunately would appear to spread and perpetuate this incorrect usage.
17th Feb '18 1:10:43 AM needsanewhobby
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** And while we're on the subject, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), the body in charge of chemical nomenclature, spells it "sulfur". (This was a compromise between British and American English speakers, in exchange for the British English spelling of "aluminium".)
17th Feb '18 1:05:54 AM needsanewhobby
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** Finally, asexual can also refer to "not having a sex" (as opposed to a sex ''drive''), most commonly in the term "asexual reproduction". However, context is usually sufficient to distinguish the terms - it depends on whether you're discussing humans, or non-human species.
9th Feb '18 7:42:34 AM Morgenthaler
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* '''Fascism''' is a loose political ideology that combines nationalism, militarism, anti-socialism and conservatism ([[EnemyMine insofar as Fascists and Conservatives can both agree that socialism and liberalism are bad]]). It's also associated with [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness anti-conservatism]] (because unlike conservatives they look to the future and not to the past for their ideal end-goal society), futurism, corporatism (i.e. Country-Corporation co-operation), military expansionism, and Social Darwinism. Most modern people and political parties that don't self-identify as "fascist" probably aren't fascists. Definite no-no's include communists, socialists, anarchists, feminists, environmentalists, liberals, inter/anti-nationalists, pacifists, the USA's Republican and Democratic Parties, [[Creator/GeorgeOrwell Youth Hostels, Gandhi, women and dogs]].
** To be more precise, even people showing antisemitic or xenophobic cannot be called "fascists" indiscriminately, as the original fascism introduced in Italy by Mussolini wasn't heavy on xenophobia (fascists' aggression was usually directed towards their internal political enemies, chiefly the Catholic Trade Unions and Socialist Parties). It was German National Socialism ("Nazism" or "Hitlerism") that introduces the ideas of racial superiority.

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* '''Fascism''' is a loose political ideology that combines nationalism, militarism, anti-socialism and conservatism ([[EnemyMine insofar as Fascists and Conservatives can both agree that socialism and liberalism are bad]]). It's also associated with [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness anti-conservatism]] (because unlike conservatives they look to the future and not to the past for their ideal end-goal society), futurism, corporatism (i.e. Country-Corporation co-operation), military expansionism, and Social Darwinism. It's not a synonym for authoritarian, since one can be oppressive without being fascist. Most modern people and political parties that don't self-identify as "fascist" probably aren't fascists. Definite no-no's include communists, socialists, anarchists, feminists, environmentalists, liberals, inter/anti-nationalists, pacifists, the USA's Republican and Democratic Parties, [[Creator/GeorgeOrwell Youth Hostels, Gandhi, women and dogs]].
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dogs]]. To be more precise, even people showing antisemitic or xenophobic cannot be called "fascists" indiscriminately, as the original fascism introduced in Italy by Mussolini wasn't heavy on xenophobia (fascists' aggression was usually directed towards their internal political enemies, chiefly the Catholic Trade Unions and Socialist Parties). It was German National Socialism ("Nazism" or "Hitlerism") that introduces the ideas of racial superiority.
30th Jan '18 4:45:04 PM nombretomado
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* Despite popular claims, in English the word "'''America'''" refers to a ''country'', not a ''continent''. Misuse of this one (e.g. claims that America is a continent, not a country) has been increasingly common among Spanish and Portuguese-speaking Latin Americans who are also fluent in English ([[MisplacedNationalism and anyone who likes bullying Americans]]). See, in the Anglosphere (as well as most of Asia and Western Europe), there is ''no'' one single continent called America. These regions of the world use a seven-continent geographic model, which includes two continents named '''North America''' and '''South America'''. Spanish and Portuguese-speaking countries use a different geographical model in which these two continents are considered one single continent called "America," but in English, the ''correct'' term for grouping North and South America together is '''the Americas'''.[[note]]North and South America physically ''are'' two continents, and Central America is a third, distinct continental plate, so the non-Iberophone world has science on its side. Both models of the continents pretend Europe and Asia exist, though, and they don'tójust Eurasia (and the Arabian and Indian subcontinents). Incidentally, a good working definition of "continent", by the way, is "large contiguous landmass, of which ''most'' is situated on a single tectonic plate, and which landmass constitutes ''most'' of the land situated on that tectonic plate. Thus the portions of Siberia on the North American Plate are not part of North America (because they are not part of the North American landmass), the Falklands are not a continent (because even if they were their own plate--they may not be--they aren't large enough), and neither is India (because although the Indian Plate is its own thing, the land of the Indian subcontinent is part of the same contiguous landmass as the Eurasian Plate, and therefore not a continent unto itself).[[/note]]

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* Despite popular claims, in English the word "'''America'''" refers to a ''country'', not a ''continent''. Misuse of this one (e.g. claims that America is a continent, not a country) has been increasingly common among Spanish and Portuguese-speaking Latin Americans who are also fluent in English ([[MisplacedNationalism ([[UsefulNotes/MisplacedNationalism and anyone who likes bullying Americans]]). See, in the Anglosphere (as well as most of Asia and Western Europe), there is ''no'' one single continent called America. These regions of the world use a seven-continent geographic model, which includes two continents named '''North America''' and '''South America'''. Spanish and Portuguese-speaking countries use a different geographical model in which these two continents are considered one single continent called "America," but in English, the ''correct'' term for grouping North and South America together is '''the Americas'''.[[note]]North and South America physically ''are'' two continents, and Central America is a third, distinct continental plate, so the non-Iberophone world has science on its side. Both models of the continents pretend Europe and Asia exist, though, and they don'tójust Eurasia (and the Arabian and Indian subcontinents). Incidentally, a good working definition of "continent", by the way, is "large contiguous landmass, of which ''most'' is situated on a single tectonic plate, and which landmass constitutes ''most'' of the land situated on that tectonic plate. Thus the portions of Siberia on the North American Plate are not part of North America (because they are not part of the North American landmass), the Falklands are not a continent (because even if they were their own plate--they may not be--they aren't large enough), and neither is India (because although the Indian Plate is its own thing, the land of the Indian subcontinent is part of the same contiguous landmass as the Eurasian Plate, and therefore not a continent unto itself).[[/note]]
25th Jan '18 3:04:31 PM WildKatGirl
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* '''Sulphur'' is an element which, under standard conditions, is a yellow solid, which means it does not have a smell because in order for a substance to have a smell it has to be a gas. However, many people still compare smelly things to sulphur (for example, by saying that something which smells bad "smells like sulphur"). The misconception that sulphur has a smell may have arisen from confusion between sulphur, sulphur dioxide (which is formed when sulphur burns) and hydrogen sulphide (which decomposes to form elemental sulphur, meaning it's often found near sulphur), as the latter two chemicals are both odourants.

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* '''Sulphur'' '''Sulphur''' is an element which, under standard conditions, is a yellow solid, which means it does not have a smell because in order for a substance to have a smell it has to be a gas. However, many people still compare smelly things to sulphur (for example, by saying that something which smells bad "smells like sulphur"). The misconception that sulphur has a smell may have arisen from confusion between sulphur, sulphur dioxide (which is formed when sulphur burns) and hydrogen sulphide (which decomposes to form elemental sulphur, meaning it's often found near sulphur), as the latter two chemicals are both odourants.
25th Jan '18 3:04:10 PM WildKatGirl
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* '''Sulphur'' is an element which, under standard conditions, is a yellow solid, which means it does not have a smell because in order for a substance to have a smell it has to be a gas. However, many people still compare smelly things to sulphur (for example, by saying that something which smells bad "smells like sulphur"). The misconception that sulphur has a smell may have arisen from confusion between sulphur, sulphur dioxide (which is formed when sulphur burns) and hydrogen sulphide (which decomposes to form elemental sulphur, meaning it's often found near sulphur), as the latter two chemicals are both odourants.
25th Jan '18 12:57:43 PM WildKatGirl
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** A molecule is also not the same as a mixture. In a molecule, atoms are chemically bonded together but in a mixture they are not. For example, air is (mostly) a ''mixture'' of nitrogen and oxygen, as it contains nitrogen and oxygen ''molecules''.
25th Jan '18 12:43:37 PM WildKatGirl
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* '''Fluid''' is not a synonym of '''liquid''', as a fluid is anything that can flow. This includes liquids, gases and plasma.
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