History YMMV / TrixieBelden

2nd Oct '16 3:59:30 AM Silverblade2
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* {{Canon Sue}}: Trixie can verge on this at times, especially in ''Mystery of the Emeralds''. Any character who doesn't adore her at first sight is vilified, Trixie monoppolizes Diana's birthday trip for her own mystery and throws a tantrum whenever someone else wants to actually explore Williamsburg, which is treated as justified, most of her endearing tomboy traits are lost. She's taught herself to develop a "photographic memory", a character meets her and immediately declares that she's the most intelligent of the three girls, and anyone who disagrees with Trixie, even for the mildest of details, is portrayed as wrong.
** In the same book, [[{{Tomboy}} Trixie]], who is from a middle-class farming family, is able to identify fake jewels with certainty before either of her two wealthy female friends, one of whom has grown up surrounded by precious jewelry, the other whose parents have recently acquired wealth and are avid buyers of ostentatious antiques and jewelry as a display of their sudden affluence. Both of them should have been able to identify the necklace before Trixie.
7th Aug '16 10:04:48 PM Anddrix
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* BaseBreaker: Hallie Belden is either the greatest or the worst character. [[LoveItOrHateIt There is no other option or middle ground.]]

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* BaseBreaker: BaseBreakingCharacter: Hallie Belden is either the greatest or the worst character. [[LoveItOrHateIt There is no other option or middle ground.]]



* {{What An Idiot}}: During ''Mystery of the Mississippi'', Trixie and her friends are being stalked by a ruthless man, who unknownst to her, is a terrorist. What she does know is that a cohort of the terrorist has already nearly succeeded in bringing her and her five friends out to an isolated spot on the river, and they were only saved by sheer luck. So what does she decide to do? Go swimming in the hotel pool, ''alone'', ''after hours'', when she knows that she is in danger, without telling anyone where she's going, which of course, leads to the terrorist nearly killing her. {{Too Dumb To Live}} barely even describes such stupidity.

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* {{What An Idiot}}: During ''Mystery of the Mississippi'', Trixie and her friends are being stalked by a ruthless man, who unknownst to her, is a terrorist. What she does know is that a cohort of the terrorist has already nearly succeeded in bringing her and her five friends out to an isolated spot on the river, and they were only saved by sheer luck. So what does she decide to do? Go swimming in the hotel pool, ''alone'', ''after hours'', when she knows that she is in danger, without telling anyone where she's going, which of course, leads to the terrorist nearly killing her. {{Too Dumb To Live}} barely even describes such stupidity.
22nd Jun '15 2:42:54 PM Anddrix
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* ProtagonistCenteredMorality: Many examples.
** In ''Mystery of the Emeralds'', she is outraged that a man yelled at her for trespassing. Though the man was rude to her (and is later revealed as a villain), he was perfectly within his rights to prevent people from trespassing on his property.
** In ''The Black Jacket Mystery'', Trixie mocks Dan (for his clothing, of all shallow things) to Honey the moment she lays eyes on him. He notices and takes offense, and is later rude to her, which offends Trixie. While Dan is no saint, Trixie was the person to begin the conflict between them, and despite the narration's attempt to justify it, she's the one who later continues the argument.
13th Nov '14 1:39:39 PM MagBas
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* AcceptableEthnicTargets: Through modern eyes, the portrayal of the Japanese brothers in ''The Mysterious Code'' is just painful. See UnfortunateImplications and NationalStereotypes.



* UnfortunateImplications: When ''The Mysterious Code'' was first printed in 1960, the two Japanese men were written as NationalStereotypes with the typical "Asian" accent of replacing '''R''''s with '''L''''s and GratuitousEnglish. The 2003 reprints removed the offensive accents but left in everything else.
17th Jul '14 9:03:25 PM BibsDibs
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** In contrast, Dan lived through the death of his father, and later on, the death of his mother, lived on the streets of New York City for a time, joined a street gang to survive, was arrested in a gang fight, and shipped off to live with his uncle, who he didn't know at all. The uncle, embarrassed to be associated with him, denied relationship to him, and shipped Dan off to live with a hermit-like gamekeeper who lived in the middle of the woods. Not only did this mean Dan was isolated from diverse human contact, but we later see that he was forced to walk long distances to reach the school bus stop (or get to anywhere) and was not equipped with the proper gear for rough terrain in winter, nor did he actually know the way. [[DepartmentofSocialDisservices Why this arrangement was allowed is anyone's guess.]] Dan is somewhere between [[VagueAge fourteen to sixteen when this is going]]. Granted, Trixie only knows about where Dan is living, not why, until the book's ending.

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** In contrast, Dan lived through the death of his father, and later on, the death of his mother, lived on the streets of New York City for a time, joined a street gang to survive, was arrested in a gang fight, and shipped off to live with his uncle, who he didn't know at all. The uncle, embarrassed to be associated with him, denied relationship to him, and shipped Dan off to live with a hermit-like gamekeeper who lived in the middle of the woods. Not only did this mean Dan was isolated from diverse human contact, but we later see that he was forced to walk long distances to reach the school bus stop (or get to anywhere) and was not equipped with the proper gear for rough terrain in winter, nor did he actually know the way. [[DepartmentofSocialDisservices [[DepartmentOfChildDisservices Why this arrangement was allowed is anyone's guess.]] Dan is somewhere between [[VagueAge fourteen to sixteen when this is going]]. Granted, Trixie only knows about where Dan is living, not why, until the book's ending.
18th May '14 9:26:50 AM Scabbard
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** The very moment Trixie sees Dan, she points and laughs with her wealthy friends, mocking his clothing. He notices this and takes offense, and doesn't make any effort to impress them when they are introduced, which irritates Trixie. However, not only is understandable to be cold toward a person who was openly mocking you, but on re-reads, the audience realizes that Dan probably did not have much other clothing to wear. Culture differences guarantee his city clothing would be viewed differently in a small suburban town.
** When Trixie and her wealthy friend Honey go horseback riding, they notice Dan wandering around the game preserve where he works, attempting to walk home from school, wearing clothing that isn't adequate for winter of wilderness. Honey offers to help him, while Trixie stares at Dan judgmentally, but Dan sullenly refuses Honey's help, expressing reservation about associating with the daughter of his employers (Again, understandable in his situation). Trixie is angered by Dan's unfriendliness, and insults him to Honey as though Dan isn't there. This incident begins bad blood between Trixie and Dan for the rest of the book and verbal battles, including her accusing him of theft and vandalism based solely on circumstantial evidence, which brings Dan's uncle to dislike him even more (though Trixie isn't aware of this). All of this is in spite of three people, Honey, another wealthy friend, and family friend whom Trixie believes is Dan's grandfather (he's not), asking Trixie to make more of an effort to be nicer to Dan, at which she only gives a single, luke-warm attempt.

to:

** The very moment Trixie sees Dan, she points and laughs with her wealthy friends, mocking his clothing. He notices this and takes offense, and doesn't make any effort to impress them when they are introduced, which irritates Trixie. However, not only is it understandable to be cold toward a person who was openly mocking you, but on re-reads, the audience realizes that Dan probably did not have much other clothing to wear. Culture differences guarantee his city clothing would be viewed differently in a small suburban town.
** When Trixie and her wealthy friend Honey go horseback riding, they notice Dan wandering around the game preserve where he works, attempting to walk home from school, wearing clothing that isn't adequate for winter of or the wilderness. Honey offers to help him, while Trixie stares at Dan judgmentally, but Dan sullenly refuses Honey's help, expressing reservation about associating with the daughter of his employers (Again, (again, understandable in his situation). Trixie is angered by Dan's unfriendliness, and insults him to Honey as though Dan isn't there. This incident begins bad blood between Trixie and Dan for the rest of the book and verbal battles, including her accusing him of theft and vandalism based solely on circumstantial evidence, which brings Dan's uncle to dislike him even more (though Trixie isn't aware of this). All of this is in spite of three people, Honey, another wealthy friend, and family friend whom Trixie believes is Dan's grandfather (he's not), asking Trixie to make more of an effort to be nicer to Dan, at which she only gives a single, luke-warm attempt.
17th May '14 10:54:47 AM Scabbard
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** Trixie lives in a sheltered small town, with an intact, stable family, in nice farmhouse with farm property. Her father is the bank manager, her mother is a homemaker. The family is said to be [[InformedFlaw poor]], but they never face any financial difficulties or shortage of food or clothing, and they can afford to give four teenagers five dollars a week each (This was established in 1951. With inflation, that's over forty dollars per teen each week). Her closest friends are exceedingly wealthy for their time. Trixie is thirteen.

to:

** Trixie lives in a sheltered small town, with an intact, stable family, in nice farmhouse with farm property. Her father is the bank manager, her mother is a homemaker. The family is said to be [[InformedFlaw poor]], but they never face any financial difficulties or shortage of food or clothing, and they can afford to give four teenagers five dollars a week each (This (this was established in 1951. With inflation, that's over forty dollars per teen each week). Her closest friends are exceedingly wealthy for their time. Trixie is thirteen.
1st Mar '14 9:37:03 AM Ecclytennysmithylove
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Lawful Good}}: {{Depending on the Writer}}, Dan might not be.
27th Feb '14 10:49:24 AM MichaelKatsuro
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* AcceptableEthnicTargets: Through modern eyes, the portrayal of the Japanese brothers in ''The Mysterious Code'' is just painful. See UnfortunateImplications and NationalStereotypes.



** AcceptableEthnicTargets: Through modern eyes, the portrayal of the Japanese brothers in ''The Mysterious Code'' is just painful. See UnfortunateImplications and NationalStereotypes.



** Regan is always described as "wonderful" by the Bob-Whites, but how great of a guy is he really? He sends his nephew and one living relative to live out in the woods with a stranger, initially acts ashamed to be associated with his nephew (who has spent time in a juvenile detention center), does not give the boy proper clothing he would need for his job (which involves winter weather and rough terrain), and after the nephew proves himself, rarely spends time with him, and then, when he encounters a problem himself, runs off to another city with only a note giving a very vague explanation of his actions.
*** It's worth noting that Dan has various chances to confide in his uncle about his troubles in ''The Secret of the Unseen Treasure'' and ''The Mystery of the Uninvited Guest'', but he takes none of them.

to:

** Regan is always described as "wonderful" by the Bob-Whites, but how great of a guy is he really? He sends his nephew and one living relative to live out in the woods with a stranger, initially acts ashamed to be associated with his nephew (who has spent time in a juvenile detention center), does not give the boy proper clothing he would need for his job (which involves winter weather and rough terrain), and after the nephew proves himself, rarely spends time with him, and then, when he encounters a problem himself, runs off to another city with only a note giving a very vague explanation of his actions.
***
actions. It's worth noting that Dan has various chances to confide in his uncle about his troubles in ''The Secret of the Unseen Treasure'' and ''The Mystery of the Uninvited Guest'', but he takes none of them.
1st May '13 4:40:10 PM OutlawMasque
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* DesignatedHero: While part of the series' appeal is that she is a realistic teenage girl, Trixie sometimes acts unbearably bratty, hypocritical, self-centered, smug, and excessively judgmental.



* ProtagonistCenteredMorality: Many examples.
** In ''Mystery of the Emeralds'', she is outraged that a man yelled at her for trespassing. Though the man was rude to her (and is later revealed as a villain), he was perfectly within his rights to prevent people from trespassing on his property.
** In ''The Black Jacket Mystery'', Trixie mocks Dan (for his clothing, of all shallow things) to Honey the moment she lays eyes on him. He notices and takes offense, and is later rude to her, which offends Trixie. While Dan is no saint, Trixie was the person to begin the conflict between them, and despite the narration's attempt to justify it, she's the one who later continues the argument.



** In contrast, Dan lived through the death of his father, and later on, the death of his mother, lived on the streets of New York City for a time, joined a street gang to survive, was arrested in a gang fight, and shipped off to live with his uncle, who he didn't know at all. The uncle, embarrassed to be associated with him, denied relationship to him, and shipped Dan off to live with a hermit-like gamekeeper who lived in the middle of the woods. Not only did this mean Dan was isolated from diverse human contact, but we later see that he was forced to walk long distances to reach the school bus stop (or get to anywhere) and was not equipped with the proper gear for rough terrain in winter, nor did he actually know the way. [[SocialServicesDoNotExist Why this arrangement was allowed is anyone's guess.]] Dan is somewhere between [[VagueAge fourteen to sixteen when this is going]]. Granted, Trixie only knows about where Dan is living, not why, until the book's ending.

to:

** In contrast, Dan lived through the death of his father, and later on, the death of his mother, lived on the streets of New York City for a time, joined a street gang to survive, was arrested in a gang fight, and shipped off to live with his uncle, who he didn't know at all. The uncle, embarrassed to be associated with him, denied relationship to him, and shipped Dan off to live with a hermit-like gamekeeper who lived in the middle of the woods. Not only did this mean Dan was isolated from diverse human contact, but we later see that he was forced to walk long distances to reach the school bus stop (or get to anywhere) and was not equipped with the proper gear for rough terrain in winter, nor did he actually know the way. [[SocialServicesDoNotExist [[DepartmentofSocialDisservices Why this arrangement was allowed is anyone's guess.]] Dan is somewhere between [[VagueAge fourteen to sixteen when this is going]]. Granted, Trixie only knows about where Dan is living, not why, until the book's ending.
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